home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library, Resources and Services Without Intent to Preserve, Digital News as Public Record Will Disappear

Without Intent to Preserve, Digital News as Public Record Will Disappear

COLUMBIA, MO – It’s no headline that newsrooms across the country today are struggling to survive, battered by multiple economic forces, the manic march of digital competition and technology, the storm of political attacks on their mission and in 2020 the sudden repercussions of an invisible pandemic predator. While these are well known across the news industry, one little-recognized, unlisted casualty of this struggle is the impact on an irreplaceable resource that citizens and researchers rely on: the public record of their communities as recorded by their local newspaper, radio or TV station, online newsroom or other news outlet.

The results of an 18-month long research investigation to discover how news organizations in the U.S, and Europe are preserving digital news and to identify best practices, problem areas and changes needed to avoid unintentional loss of content were released today in the report: Endangered but Not Too Late: The State of Digital News Preservation.

Leading a group of University of Missouri faculty researchers and industry experts on this project, Edward McCain, Digital Curator of Journalism from the University of Missouri Libraries and the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute and his team interviewed 115 individuals from 29 news organizations, four news technology companies, two news aggregators and five memory institutions, diving deeply into the technology used by these organizations in order to better understand how digital news content can be preserved.

What’s clear from this research is that the typical expectation of readers and the public, that news preservation is automatic in the digital age, simply isn’t correct. Chances are, in fact, that unless news organizations do something specific and intentional to preserve it, some or all of their born-digital content will be gone in a few years. It will no longer be accessible, readable, searchable or recoverable unless deliberate steps are taken to ensure it is.

Some of the findings:

  • Newsrooms save some but not all digital content
  • Saved content is mostly text, images, video
  • Public media have better resources, better archives
  • Internal use is primary, public access important but often outsourced
  • Top tech challenge is managing multiple digital channels
  • Web CMS is central, often doubles as archive
  • Some use asset systems as archives, others rely on web CMS
  • News metadata is often haphazard, inconsistent
  • System migrations often lead to lost content
  • Financial stress on news industry displaces preservation
  • Migration to digital publishing incomplete, can mean lost content
  • Relying solely on web CMS can be problematic for preservation
  • There’s often nobody left to mind the archive store
  • Good preservation is linked strongly to mission, policy, track record
  • Track record of preservation matters

Based on the findings, the report offers three levels of recommendations for news organizations to preserve their digital content, based on degree of difficulty or cost.

  • Immediate actions: Steps that can be taken now, at little or no cost, to begin the process of ensuring news content is preserved
  • Medium-term actions: Steps outlined in the report are actions that will take longer to accomplish and may involve investments in technologies, staff or funding
  • Industry-wide actions: Long-term steps that involve more than one newsroom pursuing solutions that involve policy changes, institutional partnerships, actions by industry sub-groups or news associations as well as some government actions

The Preserving Digital News Project was generously supported by the Andrew. W. Mellon Foundation

For more information about:  Endangered but Not Too Late: The State of Digital News Preservation, visit https://www.rjionline.org/preservenews

SOURCE: University of Missouri Libraries  & the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute

CONTACT:  For comment, please contact:  Edward McCain (mccaine@rjionline.org), Digital Curator of Journalism

home Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library Deborah Willis, Artist and Photographer – Interviews and books held at the MU Libraries

Deborah Willis, Artist and Photographer – Interviews and books held at the MU Libraries

A virtual display of the life and books of the artist and photographer, Deborah Willis.

 

https://spark.adobe.com/page/ZYMtHBO9rPcTn/ 

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library New to MU? Check out the FAQs about the Journalism Library

New to MU? Check out the FAQs about the Journalism Library

 

We hope everyone had a great break and for those of you who are new to MU welcome! We hope you have a great semester and that you use the MU Libraries.  Here is a quick guide to let you know important things about using the Journalism Library.    See information on reopening plans and using the library during Covid.

 

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library Finding Journalism & Communication E-Books

Finding Journalism & Communication E-Books

Sandy Schiefer, Sue Schuermann and Dorothy Carner have published a guide for finding Journalism and Communication E-Books.

From MA Projects to Textbooks with a subject guide to help you find what you need.

 

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

Article request services unavailable Tuesday November 26

Due to a software upgrade, article requesting via FindIt@MU and Illiad will not be available Tuesday, November 26.

Urgent article requests can be emailed to ellisi@missouri.edu during the outage:

We apologize for the inconvenience.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Journalism Library Pauline Pfeiffer Display and Presentation by Anthony Childress

Pauline Pfeiffer Display and Presentation by Anthony Childress

Anthony Childress works as a graduate assistant in Arkansas State University’s Heritage Studies doctoral program at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center in Piggott, Arkansas.
In May, they dedicated a new Pauline Pfeiffer traveling exhibit that is housed in the upstairs of our museum. As curator of the endeavor, Anthony’s focus zeroed in on Pfeiffer’s distinguished career as a reporter and editor before her marriage to Ernest Hemingway. Pfeiffer graduated from the University of Missouri with a journalism degree and moved on to claim bylines in newspapers across the United States and eventually landed in Paris, working for Vogue magazine after a stint with Vanity Fair.
Childress, a former journalist, says Pfeiffer’s story is one of great interest and felt, given her ties to Mizzou, that it would seem the ideal place to host the exhibit. It consists of three panels. The first panel is about her high school and collegiate days and a poem she published, the second panel features examples of her reporting news and features for daily papers and Vogue, and the third panel transitions into her role as Hemingway’s editor during their 13-year marriage.
TAGS:

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library, Resources and Services Resources for Journalism Graduate Students

Resources for Journalism Graduate Students

Starting your literature review?  Make sure to check out the Journalism Graduate Student Resources Libguide.

Whether you are an online student or here on campus.  Getting help is just an email away.  Contact Dorothy Carner carnerd@missouri.edu or Sue Schuermann schuermanns@missouri.edu to help you from start to finish.

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Journalism Library Congrats to Our Instagram Takeover Winner!

Congrats to Our Instagram Takeover Winner!

Congratulations to Annie (Ningyuan) Hu!  Annie was selected as the Journalism Library’s Instagram Takeover winner.

In March, the Journalism Library wanted to hear from the students.  We encouraged students to submit a short video (no more than 15 seconds) to our Instagram telling us why they loved the library.  Annie submitted a great video, highlighting our space and equipment!  You can find her video here!

Annie is a senior Strategic Communication major who plans to work in fashion and/or beauty marketing.  She visits the library daily to study and checkout equipment.   When asked about the Journalism Library, Annie said “I like it, I love it! It makes me want to study here!”

A big thank you to Annie for her video!  Be sure to check us out on Instagram!

home Journalism Library Fulbright Scholar Appreciates the Journalism Library Resources

Fulbright Scholar Appreciates the Journalism Library Resources

By Christina Mascarenas

Going to America was more a dream than reality to Indah Setiwati; a 30 hour plane ride dream. Indah was the deputy editor for the Jakarta Post in Jakarta, Indonesia when she decided to make a change and apply to attend graduate school.

In the beginning, Indah only applied to local scholarships even though studying aboard is a goal for many Indonesians. Indah had her family to think about. Not wanting Indah to limit her academic potential, a friend encouraged Indah to apply for the Fulbright Foreign Student Program, a program that enables graduate students, young professionals and artists from abroad to study and conduct research in the United States. If Indah was accepted she would finally have her ticket to the United States.

After weighing the pros and cons, Indah decided to go for it and applied to four scholarships including the Fulbright program. One day, she was taking the train to work when she received an email telling her she was accepted into the Fulbright program. It was “surreal,” she said. “The Fulbright Scholarship is the most prestigious scholarship on earth.”

Indah did research to find the best journalism school in the U.S. that would fit her interest. She chose Missouri because it’s the best journalism school and was affordable with her Fulbright Scholarship.

According to Indah, the Journalism Library at Mizzou has knowledgeable librarians. “Sue is really helpful and resourceful,” she stated referring to Sue Schuermann, Senior Library Specialist. Sue took the time to show Indah how to do precise searches and search for specific journals. “She is very helpful. She is a great resource, all you have to do it ask,” she said.

When Indah needed a book that the library didn’t have Sue was able to purchase the book for the library. When it arrived two days later Indah borrowed it for the semester. Indah was especially grateful for the “really cool” interlibrary loan program is “really cool,” Indah said. When she wanted to read a particular book, she was asked if she’d like to read the PDF or the book, she chose both. She thought it was great to get the book in three days.

“Books in Indonesia are precious. They are like a treasure,” she said. “Especially children’s books, it’s really hard to get English children’s books in Indonesia, they are expensive.” In addition to the Journalism Library, she has used Ellis Library, and the Daniel Boone Regional Library. She said American libraries are great, “They are like wow.” In Indonesia, according to Indah, “If you want to get an affordable children’s English book. You have to go to a second-hand store. The upper-class Jakartans donate or sell their books to the second-hand stores. You can only find books at certain places.”

“I’m happier here to see the library resources,” she said. “Another cool thing about the library is you have access to the New York Times and other publications and you don’t have to spend your money to subscribe to them since the library already subscribes to them.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cycle of Success

TAGS:

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.