home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Resources and Services MOspace: Increasing Open Access Availability for All

MOspace: Increasing Open Access Availability for All

International Open Access Week is October 19 – 25! This year’s theme is Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion.

There are many options for MU researchers to make their work available open access, but one option available for all University of Missouri faculty is to make a copy available in the MOspace institutional repository.

We are working on several ways to help maximize the reach and persistence of your scholarship and increase awareness of MOspace as an option for Open Access scholarship. As we collect and analyze data about what our researchers are publishing, we are finding that many articles are already available via paid, “gold” Open Access (represented in gold in the images below). When we can, we are collecting these articles and preserving them in MOspace as an additional safeguard to ensuring their long-term availability and accessibility. We are currently processing 371 articles from 2019 and 2020 that meet various criteria for this stage of the project, 76 have already been included in MOspace, and more are on the way. Paid, full Open Access is great but still represents only a fraction MU’s total research output. We are working on ways to reach out individually to authors whose publications qualify for inclusion in MOspace (such as by publisher or funder policy) to encourage authors to upload their manuscripts/postprints whenever possible.

Even articles that are published with a traditional (non-Open Access) license can often be included in an institutional repository in the form of the final manuscript or postprint (your final, post-peer-review “draft”). The image below shows at least 1,095 articles published by MU authors (according to Scopus) in 2019 that currently have no known freely-available full text online, but could be made available in a repository such as MOspace on the basis of the publisher’s standard “green open access” policy. This would make the clear majority of MU research output openly available in some form (gold, hybrid, bronze, and green are all forms of Open Access availability under different terms).

Nearly 80% of MU-authored articles could be openly available

The following image shows the publication activity by publisher, and also helps show how much of our output that is currently “paywalled” could potentially be made available. Each bar represents the number of MU articles published by that publisher in 2019 (according to Scopus), and the red portion represents the number of those articles for which there is currently no available open access copy. Nearly all of these top publishers (each of the top 6 and many others) will allow authors to deposit most article manuscripts in institutional repositories such as MOspace via a green open access policy. The green segments represent where an author, co-author, or other delegate has already done so.

As libraries and researchers in the United States and around the world continue to respond to budgetary and inflationary price pressures by increasingly relying on interlibrary loan and other delivery services instead of instant full-text search and availability via subscription, making your work available this way helps ensure that it is searchable, discoverable, and reviewable by all and can lead to higher usage and citation of the final published version. MOspace can also be home to books and other forms of research and scholarship, too! Please contact your subject specialist, email us at MOspace, see the guide, or submit works online if you are interested in maximizing the reach of your scholarship via MOspace.

Enhance the Visibility of Your Work by Publishing Open Access

This week is Open Access Week! Open Access Week, a global event now entering its tenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

Recently we asked Dr.Julie Kapp, MPH, PhD, FACE, Associate Professor at the School of Medicine why she considers open access when publishing her research.

In July 2019, Dr. Kapp published Kombucha: a systematic review of the empirical evidence of human health benefit as an open access article in Annals of Epidemiology. According to PlumX metrics, the article has been picked up by several news outlets and blogs, mentioned over 500 times on social media, and continues to be the top MU-authored paper on the ScienceDirect website, with over 5565 downloads worldwide.

 

Julie M. Kapp, MPH, PhD.

Why did you choose to publish open access?

I published open access because anyone can access the paper, regardless of institutional affiliation or journal subscriptions. There is a demonstrated citation advantage. Open access also facilitates broader diffusion and dissemination of your ideas inside and outside the academic community. That means it is more accessible to journalists and bloggers who may write about your work. And isn’t the purpose of science to have a broader societal benefit? Open access allows anyone with an interest to learn about your work.

Why was it important despite the fee to move your article out from behind the paywall? Do you see a benefit to having taken the open access route?

For this particular paper, a lot of the interest comes from the topic and the timing of my paper. Still, it being open access no doubt facilitated its accessibility and circulation. This paper was highlighted in Discover Magazine, The New York Times, Yahoo Lifestyle, Psychology Today, an Australian blog, and the official news broadcast of Israel, among other outlets.

Advice to others?

If you have the funding, I would highly recommend open access. If you do not have the funding, our Departments and Schools/Colleges should consider creating resources tagged for open access requests, if we are to be competitive with top schools.

 

Learn how you can take action with Open Access

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2020

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2020

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

Once-daily, subcutaneous vosoritide therapy in children with achondroplasia: a randomised, double-blind, phase 3, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial” was co-authored by Dr. Daniel Hoernschemeyer of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. The article was published in The Lancet  (impact factor of 60.392 in 2019).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/code/facultypubmonthly/faculty_publications.php?Month=September&Year=2020

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

This year, the campus is facing the task of reducing our journal costs by $1.2 million for FY2021, which amounts to a 20% reduction.  To stay within our budget, we will need to cancel our “big deals” with Elsevier, Wiley, Springer Nature, Oxford and Sage publishers.   

We are taking a data-driven approach to these painful cuts, focusing on maintaining access to as many as possible of the 2000+ health sciences journals you viewed at least 100 times in 2019.  Journals which cost over $1500 will be subject to additional scrutiny.   

In order to maintain access to as many of the heavily used titles as possible, we will need to rely on pay-per-view and interlibrary loan access to articles in lieu of subscriptions for high cost and low use journals.  Delivery times will vary from 1 hour to a couple of days.

This process is further complicated by several factors:  

  • The sheer number of the titles owned by these publishers, many with impact factors in the top quartile for their discipline
  • Subscription cuts at the UM System level this year; our campus stands to lose access to about 900 journals unless we can make room for them in our budget
  • The lack of pricing transparency from some of these publishers 

These measures will continue to be necessary as long as runaway price increases continue.   These unsustainable price increases have been going on for years.You may recall that we lost 20% of our health sciences journal budget in 2017, which further hampers our ability to absorb this most recent round of cuts.   

Join us at an upcoming forum to learn about some steps you can take to bring prices under control.   

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Journal Prices Increase More than True Inflation

Every year, universities face journal subscription price increases. The health sciences have been feeling the impact of these increases for at least 20 years and have been dealing with unsustainable subscription pricing for a very long time, and now it’s a problem for all disciplines.

The cost of these journals often outstrips library budgets, leaving the libraries battling both price increases and revenue stagnation.

“Many libraries are cutting continuing expenditures by cancelling or breaking up journal packages and buying only those titles for which use or demand justifies the price. Others are aggressively renegotiating contracts with publishers to reduce ongoing costs.” [1]

Take a a look at subscription costs of a few journals in the early 1980s vs. what the University of Missouri system pays now.

Journal Title Cost in 1983 Cost if Based on True Inflation [2] Cost Today
Nature $220 $354.11 $40,292.31
Science $85 $136.82 $25,884.06
New England Journal of Medicine $48 $77.26 $18,890.00

 

Why are journal prices increasing so much from year to year? Publishing companies are big businesses and they must make their business profitable. Over the years, these bigger companies have bought smaller publishing companies, causing a lack of competition and the ability to set their own prices.

Do you know the price of the journals you write for and edit? How much did they cost 5 years ago? Contact us if you’d like the price history for a journal, or to learn more about how you can help bring journal prices under control.

[1] Costs Outstrip Library Budgets | Periodicals Price Survey 2020
[2] Based on the cumulative inflation rate from the Bureau of Labor Statistics consumer price index

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library MU Remembers: Health Sciences Library Honors with Books

MU Remembers: Health Sciences Library Honors with Books

Every year MU honors those who have passed through the MU Remembers ceremony. To commemorate the lives of these individuals, a book is chosen for each and added to the Health Sciences Library collection. Bookplates are placed inside each of the books and the students, faculty, and staff honored through this program are listed as honorees on the books’ library catalog records. For more information about our Honor with Books program, click here.

Below is the list of students, faculty, and staff who were honored through the Health Sciences Library.

Alyssa Turner (School of Health Professions): Hemphill, Barbara. (2020). Occupational therapy and spirituality

William Salzer (College of Medicine): Baker, Carol J. (ed.). (2020). Red book atlas of pediatric infectious diseases

Judy Gentzsch (Hospital Nursing Services): Harris, James, & Roussel, Linda, & Thomas, Tricia (eds.). (2018). Initiating and sustaining the clinical nurse leader role: a practical guide

Nicole Guillames (School of Medicine): Higgins, Robert S.D., & Sanchez, Juan A. (2018). The multi-organ donor: A guide to selection, preservation and procurement

Melissa Johnson (MU Hospital): The American Cancer Society (ed.) (2018). The American Cancer Society’s principles of oncology: Prevention to survivorship

Christy Old (School of Medicine): Jespersen, Elias A. (ed.) (2019). Exploring the opportunities and challenges of medical students

Michelle Robinett (Pharmacy and Laboratory Services): Dasgupta, Amitava, & Sepulveda, Jorge. (2019). Accurate results in the clinical laboratory: A guide to error detection and correction

James Yeagle (MU Hospital): Cheng, Fanjun, & Zhang, Yu (eds.). (2020). The clinical diagnosis and treatment for new coronavirus pneumonia

For the full list, visit https://library.missouri.edu/news/gateway-carousel/mu-remembers-honors-with-books

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: August 2020

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: August 2020

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

Single-Session Bronchial Thermoplasty Guided by 129Xe Magnetic Resonance Imaging. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial” was co-authored by Dr. Robert Thomen of the Department of Radiology. The article was published in American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine (impact factor of 17.452 in 2019).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/code/facultypubmonthly/faculty_publications.php?Month=August&Year=2020

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library One Journal Publishing Company is More Profitable Than Netflix

One Journal Publishing Company is More Profitable Than Netflix

If your article was published within the last few years, there’s a good chance it was in a journal owned by one these four companies: Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer and Taylor & Francis. In the early 1970s, they published 15% of the researched produced in the world*. Today, it’s up to 53% of the world’s research.*

Over the years, these publishing companies have merged and acquired smaller publishers, in an effort to own even more of the journal landscape. The lack of competition allows these companies the ability to charge a high price, often not allowing universities to buy journals outright, instead only letting universities rent journals through subscriptions. Universities often pay millions to rent access to research their own faculty conduct.

The biggest contender in the journal publishing market is Elsevier. With 3,000 journals and publishing nearly half a million articles per year, RELX, the parent company of Elsevier, had revenues of US $9.8 billion in 2019. Elsevier’s profits account for about 34% of RELX’s total profits.

You can read more about these oligopolies (market shared by a small number of producers or sellers) and how they are contributing to the unaffordability of journals in the Vox article The War to Free Science

 

*This percentage includes Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and American Chemical Society
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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Companies Get Rich Off Of University Research

Companies Get Rich Off Of University Research

Scholarly publishing is big business

“The industry built to publish and disseminate scientific articles — companies such as Elsevier and Springer Nature — has managed to become incredibly profitable by getting a lot of taxpayer-funded, highly skilled labor for free and affixing a premium price tag to its goods.” (1)

In order for universities to access this research, they are often required to purchase subscriptions with a hefty price tag. Universities worldwide spend millions per year so faculty can download and read their own work and that of their colleagues. Since these journals are behind university paywalls, the only option for members of the tax-paying public to gain access is for them to purchase individual articles. That can be pricey when articles may cost $20-$50 each.

Pay more, get less every year

How much money is at stake? Billions of dollars (2). Every year universities struggle to keep up with price increases to journal subscription packages that are far above annual inflation. Since subscription prices are rising much faster than library budgets, collections cuts are necessary.

Universities are fighting back

Many universities have established or are currently looking into establishing programs to assist in the transition of journals from the subscription model to open access. Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open access is the needed modern update for the communication of research that fully utilizes the Internet for what it was originally built to do—accelerate research. Accelerated research means increased return on investment, increased potential contributors, increased audience and collaborators, and increased access for the public. (3).

Read more about the impact these increases are having across the country.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, Workshops Upcoming Online Workshop: Demystifying the Literature Review, Sept. 16

Upcoming Online Workshop: Demystifying the Literature Review, Sept. 16

For a complete schedule of workshops, visit library.missouri.edu/workshops.

  • Demystifying the Literature Review

Click on the link to register. You will receive a Zoom link and password by email. The workshops will be recorded, edited and posted online for anyone who can’t attend live.