home Gateway Carousel HSL Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: August 2023

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: August 2023

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri School of Medicine faculty-authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article, “Lower female survival from an opportunistic infection reveals progesterone-driven sex bias in trained immunity” , was co-authored by Dr. R. Scott Rector of the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology,  Dr. Laura Schulz of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health, and Dr. Adam Schrum of the Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology. The article was published in Cell Reports (impact factor of 8.8 in 2022).

Note that Dr. James Stevermer also had publications in JAMA as a member of the USPSTF:

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/facpubmonthlyresult/?Month=August&Year=2023

Chat With the Librarians Wherever You Are

Need research help? Working on a paper or project? You can ask a librarian for help using our chat service– almost 24 hours a day.

During the day you can chat with Mizzou librarians and library staff. At night, we offer access to a chat reference service called ChatStaff. They will be able to answer most research questions, except for some that are Mizzou-specific.

To access the chat service and see what hours chat reference is available, visit libraryanswers.missouri.edu.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services New MU Authored Trending Article in PubMed

New MU Authored Trending Article in PubMed

This week’s trending article in PubMed is “Associations between rurality and regional differences in sociodemographic factors and the 1918-20 influenza and 2020-21 COVID-19 pandemics in Missouri counties: An ecological study,” co-authored by Lisa SattenspielCarolyn Orbann, Hailey Ramirez, Sean Pirrone, Jane A McElroy, and Christopher K Wikle from the University of Missouri.

The article was published in PLoS ONE (impact factor 3.7).

What is a PubMed trending article?

Trending articles is a marker of increased interest in a PubMed abstract. Trending articles are those with a significant increase in daily PubMed views in the past two days as compared to the previous baseline period, which is approximately a week.

You can see the full list of trending articles here.

Interested in tracking the impact of your articles after they are published? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu to learn how we can help.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services New Ebooks at the Health Sciences Library

New Ebooks at the Health Sciences Library

Below are a few of the books we’ve recently added to our online collection.

Have a purchase recommendation? You can request a book for your teaching or research using this form.

 

intro to nursing research

Introduction to Nursing Research: Incorporating Evidence-Based Practice

Giving students the tools they need to become effective practitioners, this text is a comprehensive guide for integrating evidence-based practice and research into the day-to-day work of nursing. Mastery of research will allow students training to be nurses to provide quality patient care and improve healthcare outcomes overall. As in previous editions, the authors take a thoughtful and practical approach by combining research, quality improvement, and evidence-based practice. The Sixth Edition focuses on the connection between research and evidence-based practice as a foundation for safe and effective health care.

 

refugee mental healthRefugee Mental Health 

This book is an in-depth practical guide for mental health practitioners working across diverse theoretical orientations to provide mental health services tailored to the needs of refugees. These needs are felt more keenly than ever as displaced populations continue to grow. Refugees often experience high rates of psychological distress, and appropriate mental health care services remain severely underdeveloped. Chapters in this edited volume outline research-supported psychological interventions that can be used in a culturally sensitive manner. They cover important topics like cultural humility, issues in screening and assessments, and specific ethical dilemmas when working with refugees. The book explores the ways in which Western interventions such as cognitive behavior therapy, group therapy, expressive therapy, and school-based programs have been adapted to serve resettled refugee populations.

 

Making Play Just Right: Unleashing the Power of Play in Occupational TherapyMaking Play Just Right: Unleashing the Power of Play in Occupational Therapy

At the heart of Making Play Just Right: Unleashing the Power of Play in Occupational Therapy is the belief that the most effective way to ensure pediatric occupational therapy is through incorporating play. The Second Edition is a unique resource on pediatric activity and therapy analysis for occupational therapists and students. This text provides the background, history, evidence, and general knowledge needed to use a playful approach to pediatric occupational therapy, as well as the specific examples and recommendations needed to help therapists adopt these strategies.

 

Precision Medicine and Artificial IntelligencePrecision Medicine and Artificial Intelligence: the Perfect Fit for Autoimmunity 

Precision Medicine and Artificial Intelligence: The Perfect Fit for Autoimmunity covers background on artificial intelligence (AI), its link to precision medicine (PM), and examples of AI in healthcare, especially autoimmunity. The book highlights future perspectives and potential directions as AI has gained significant attention during the past decade. Autoimmune diseases are complex and heterogeneous conditions, but exciting new developments and implementation tactics surrounding automated systems have enabled the generation of large datasets, making autoimmunity an ideal target for AI and precision medicine.

 

Making Sense of Medical StatisticsMaking Sense of Medical Statistics: a Bite Sized Visual Guide 

Do you want to know what a parametric test is and when not to perform one? Do you get confused between odds ratios and relative risks? Want to understand the difference between sensitivity and specificity? Would like to find out what the fuss is about Bayes’ theorem? Then this book is for you! Physicians need to understand the principles behind medical statistics. They don’t need to learn the formula. The software knows it already! This book explains the fundamental concepts of medical statistics so that the learner will become confident in performing the most commonly used statistical tests. Each chapter is rich in anecdotes, illustrations, questions, and answers. Not enough? There is more material online with links to free statistical software, webpages, multimedia content, a practice dataset to get hands-on with data analysis, and a Single Best Answer questionnaire for the exam.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Summer Reads for Doctors — or Anyone Interested in the World of Medicine

Summer Reads for Doctors — or Anyone Interested in the World of Medicine

Stacy Weiner, Senior Staff Writer at the Association of American Medical Colleges recently curated a list of 9 great books for doctors or anyone interested in medicine.

Take a journey through the human body, travel through time to the start of nursing, and explore the world of gene sequencing all from the comfort of your couch or hammock with this year’s list of summer reads.

The connection between molecules and madness. Preventing another catastrophe like the COVID-19 pandemic. Health inequities among Black pregnant people. Gene sequencing that helped restore vision to a boy who hadn’t seen his mother for years. This year’s crop of recently published medicine-related books covers all this and more.

Below are a few from the list that you can request from MOBIUS:

 

American Breakdown: Our Ailing Nation, My Body’s Revolt, and the Nineteenth-Century Woman Who Brought Me Back to Life, Jennifer Lunden, LCSW

At 21, social worker and writer Jennifer Lunden was struck by an inexplicably exhausting condition — she couldn’t even stand for a shower — that was ultimately diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). With few resources and scant hope, she became terribly depressed. But she eventually found solace in an unusual place: 19th-century diarist Alice James, who suffered similar symptoms and was initially labeled a female hysteric. Lunden soon began digging into the science behind CFS, exploring the work of immunologists, toxicologists, and infectious disease doctors. From there, she began thinking about the broader landscape of health in the United States, including the worrisome effects of stress, dangerous exposure to chemicals, and inadequate access to health care. Now feeling better thanks to a range of treatments, Lunden recognizes that she may never be fully well. “I’m a work in progress,” she writes. “So are you; so are we all. And I, for one, will keep trying.”

 

Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth, Dana-Ain Davis, PhD

In the United States, Black women are twice as likely to give birth prematurely than their White peers — and financial success offers scant protection. Anthropologist Dana-Ain Davis, PhD, spent seven years plumbing the race-related factors that fuel Black babies’ early arrivals and subsequent need for neonatal intensive care. She traces a path back to slavery and such racist tropes as the hardiness of Black women while also describing the contemporary phenomenon of stress “weathering” Black bodies. Davis’s in-depth interviews with mothers of different ages, incomes, regions, and educational levels reveal a repeated sense of being dismissed by medical personnel. Turning to possible solutions, Davis highlights prevention, including empowering people who want to use doulas and community-based birthing supports. Without such efforts, she warns, Black Americans will continue to face the often lifelong health effects of being born too soon.

 

The Genome Odyssey: Medical Mysteries and the Incredible Quest to Solve Them, Euan Ashley, MD, PhD

Decoding a patient’s genome — the individualized alphabet of life — once cost billions and took months, but newer methods provide the opportunity to quickly treat patients suffering from mysterious, gene-based conditions. In The Genome Odyssey, Euan Ashley, MD, PhD, describes the scientific journey behind those advances as well as the patients who have benefited from them. One is a young man who, after his vision was restored by gene therapy, asked, “Mom, is that you?” A leader in the field and a Stanford University professor of medicine and genetics, Ashley anticipates greater advances to come, partly thanks to research on people whose super-powered genomes offer extraordinary health protection. Meanwhile, Ashley says he is motivated by the many patients still in need of help. They are, he writes, “the reason I get up every morning.”

 

Taking Care: The Story of Nursing and Its Power to Change the World, Sarah DiGregorio

Nurses have treated enslaved people, been tried as witches, gone to jail for providing birth control, and saved lives during wars and pandemics. Journalist Sarah DiGregorio digs into this rich history while also exploring the current reach of the profession — from patient education to policy work and from neonatal care to hospice support. She also describes the sometimes sexist and racist notions surrounding the career. For one, while Florence Nightingale was hailed as the founder of modern nursing, her Jamaican-born contemporary Mary Seacole was condescendingly dubbed “the Black Nightingale.” But the book’s most compelling moments may be DiGregorio’s own experiences with nurses: those who supported her as her mother died from breast cancer, distracted her as she anxiously awaited her own biopsy results, and held her as she prepared for an emergency cesarean section. Ultimately, she asks in praise of this often-overlooked profession, “Could we be human without nursing?”

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

Finding the Best Study Space

We have spaces for everyone. If you prefer silence, check out rooms 201 and 202 in Ellis Library. Check out this Ellis Library floorplan to see all the quiet spots. Journalism also has four private personal study pods on the bottom floor that are first come, first served.

If you don’t prefer complete silence, try the Information Commons (the first floor of Ellis Library). Or the Bookmark Café on the ground floor for coffee and conversation. You can always take a look at the Ellis Library sensory map to find the best study space for you.

If it’s a group study spot you are searching for, try to reserve one of the group study rooms in either Ellis, Engineering, or Journalism. They can be reserved for up to two hours for each group. Some also have Solstice monitors to help groups studying together share information with one another. Whatever you need, make sure and plan ahead, as rooms fill up quickly! Currently, the Health Sciences Library is under renovation.

Remember, if your program has its own library, be sure to check out those spaces, as they are often designated specifically for you!

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home Gateway Carousel HSL New Ebook Highlight: The Washington Manual of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

New Ebook Highlight: The Washington Manual of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

We’ve recently added The Washington Manual of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement by MU Health Care Chief Quality Officer Dr. Emily Fondahn to our online collection.

Concise, portable, and user-friendly, The Washington Manual of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement covers essential information in every area of this complex field. With a focus on improving systems and processes, preventing errors, and promoting transparency, this practical reference provides an overview of PS/QI fundamentals, as well as insight into how these principles apply to a variety of clinical settings.

Part of the popular Washington Manual series, this unique volume provides the knowledge and skills necessary for an effective, proactive approach to patient safety and quality improvement.

You can access the book online.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Fall 2023 Health Sciences Textbooks Available Online or at Ellis Library

Fall 2023 Health Sciences Textbooks Available Online or at Ellis Library

Fall 2023 required and optional textbooks for classes are now available and we have a new way system to find them!

Pick the school/college, then your program, and finally the course. It’s as easy as that. Access textbook copies at the Health Sciences Library here.

Note: Paper copies will be available at Ellis Library for 24 hour checkout time during the Health Sciences Library Renovation. Any duplicate copies of textbooks are available and subject to regular check out times.

Some ebooks are limited to one viewer at a time, so please close your browser window when you are finished so that the book will be available to others.

Unfortunately, we don’t have all the books required for every class. If we don’t have your textbook, there are several avenues you can use to find a copy, which are all clearly labeled on each class page.

You can also recommend the Health Sciences Library purchase an online copy here. Please provide what course the textbook is for and the name of your instructor.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services New Ebook Highlight: Strategic Science Communication

New Ebook Highlight: Strategic Science Communication

We’ve recently added Strategic Science Communication: a Guide to Setting the Right Objectives for More Effective Public Engagement to our online collection.

What tactics can effective science communicators use to reach a wide audience and achieve their goals?

Effective science communication—the type that can drive behavior change while boosting the likelihood that people will turn to science when faced with challenges—is not simply a matter of utilizing social media or employing innovative tactics like nudges. Even more important for success is building long-term strategic paths to achieve well-articulated goals. Smart science communicators also want to create communication opportunities to improve their own thinking and behavior.

In this guidebook, John C. Besley and Anthony Dudo encapsulate their practical expertise in 11 evidence-based principles of strategic science communication. Among other things, science communicators, they argue, should strive to seem competent, warm, honest, and willing to listen. Their work should also convey a desire to make the world a better place. Highlighting time-tested methods for building rapport with an audience through several modes of communication, Besley and Dudo explain how to achieve each strategic objective. All scientific communication is goal-oriented, and Besley and Dudo discuss the importance of recognizing the right goals, then employing strategic and tactical communication in order to achieve them. Finally, they offer specific suggestions for how practitioners can evaluate the effectiveness of their communications (and in fact, build evaluation into their plans from the beginning).

Strategic Science Communication is the first book to use social science to help scientists and professional science communicators become more evidence-based. Besley and Dudo draw on insightful research into the science of science communication to provide readers with an opportunity to think more deeply about how to make communication choices. This guidebook is essential reading for all professionals in the field.

You can access the book online.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.