home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Mizzou Libraries’ Favorite Female Authors

Mizzou Libraries’ Favorite Female Authors

National Women’s Month may be coming to an end, but there are still many ways you can support female voices throughout the rest of this month and beyond! Whether you chose to donate to a nonprofit organization or decide to learn more about women’s history through sites such as https://womenshistorymonth.gov/, here at Mizzou Libraries, we encourage you to continue showcasing and uplifting women’s voices however you can. One of our favorite ways to celebrate anything at our libraries is by supporting our favorite books and authors! To celebrate National Women’s Month, we asked some library staff members who their favorite female authors are!

 

Rachel Brekhus (Librarian III, Humanities/Social Sciences Librarian, Instruction Department): Octavia Butler, Sheri S. Tepper, and Harriet Washington.

 

William Morgan (Library Information Specialist, E-Learning): Marilynne Robinson and Jesmyn Ward.

 

Gwen Gray (Librarian III, Business, Economics, & Entrepreneurship): Donna Leon, Agatha Christie, Carol Carnac, Sujata Massey, Anne Perry, and Charles Todd.

 

Corrie Hutchinson (Associate University Librarian for Acquisitions, Collections, and Technical Services): Jane Austen and Agatha Christie.

 

Rebecca Graves (Educational Services Librarian, Health Sciences Library): Ursula Le Guin and N. K. Jemisin.

 

Erin Merrill (Library Info Specialist): Sophie Kinsella and Gail Carriger.

 

Dorothy Carner (Head, Journalism Libraries): Deborah Willis (here is an online exhibit curated by Journalism Libraries showcasing Willis’ work https://spark.adobe.com/page/ZYMtHBO9rPcTn/ )

 

You can check out many of these authors at your Mizzou Libraries: http://merlin.lib.umsystem.edu/search/X

Along with reading from your favorite authors, it is also important to remember why supporting female voices is essential when consuming literature. Here is why Mizzou Libraries’ staff members believe reading work by women is important to them!

 

Corrie Hutchinson: I think it’s important to read female authors so that you have a balanced viewpoint. Books and stories are how people share viewpoints and experiences, so why limit yourself to only one perspective? Why escape to a world that only men created?  That’s just silly. No limits.

 

William Morgan: Because male authors were so much of my own education as well as what I had to teach in World Literature as a high school teacher, I feel I need to focus more on female authors so that I have a more well-rounded view of both historical and modern literature.

 

Rebecca Graves: Their writing is rich and deep. It is not so filtered through the lens of “I” of being the focus of attention when walking into a room. There’s more depth to even the minor characters. I.e., the characters are there for the story and have their own backstory. They aren’t just there to prop up the lead. I find more variety in their writing. True, all genders of writers have tackled the hero’s journey, but there are more stories to be told than simply the hero’s. I also find it confirming that women have written brilliant stories. To read Le Guin or Jemisin is to have excellent language, rich worlds, and well-crafted plots. They are masters of the craft.

 

Whatever way you decide to celebrate the duration of Women’s History Month, we hope you visit one of our Mizzou Libraries and pick up a book to support female authors!

Danielle Gorman / English Intern/ Spring 2021

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Books That Pass the Bechdel-Wallace Test

Books That Pass the Bechdel-Wallace Test

From Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, how many books do you know that barely pass the Bechdel-Wallace Test? The Bechdel-Wallace Test is a measurement used to determine the representation of women in media. There are only three requirements needed for a piece of media to pass this test. It must have at least two female characters, they must both have names, and they must talk to each other about something other than a man. While that may seem easy enough, some of the most popular pieces of media are still struggling to pass the test. This month, for Women’s History Month, we are highlighting some books that not just pass the Bechdel-Wallace Test but surpass the three requirements and focus on strong female-led stories by fantastic female authors! You can find these reads available at Mizzou libraries or request through our website.

 

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

If you are looking for a classic read to celebrate Women’s History Month, then Little Women is the perfect choice for you. This story follows four sisters—Meg, Amy, Beth, and Jo March— as they come of age during the Civil War. The timeless novel tackles themes such as first love, friendship, grief, and the bond of family; any reader can find themselves hidden inside these pages and characters. Perfect for any age, you’ll leave this story feeling heart-warmed and emotionally invested in this lively story.

P.S. Check out the 2019 film adaption of Little Women, now streaming through Mizzou services. http://merlin.lib.umsystem.edu:80/record=b13574010~S1

 

Circe by Madeline Miller

This bestselling novel takes one of the most infamous Greek figures and turns her story on its head, leaving the reader routing for a newfound hero. Perfect for those interested in mythology and action-packed novels, Madeline Miller weaves a hypnotic and captivating story filled with beautiful language and characters. Circe will leave you attached to Miller’s mastery of storytelling and entranced by the power of a well-written female lead.

 

 

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

If you haven’t yet gotten the chance to read this highly praised novel, this month is an excellent time to grab it from one of our libraries! The Handmaid’s Tale is an unforgettable, must-read novel that is great for readers looking for a heartbreaking yet eye-opening story. Set in dystopian America, this story follows Offred’s perspective, one of the women forced into the role of a “Handmaid”; women used to help reproduce children for the Republic of Gilead. Atwood’s writing is captivating and devastating. She perfectly crafts a page-turning story that leaves the reader searching for answers on every single page. 

 

 

My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante

The first novel in the four-part series, The Neapolitan Novels, My Brilliant Friend, tells the heartbreaking yet touching story of two young girls growing up in Naples in the 1950s. Elena Ferrante is a master at her craft, perfectly capturing the story of two best friends who come-of-age during a time where it feels like everything around them is falling apart. This novel leaves you aching for these characters’ struggles and places you directly onto the page with them. It is a must-read for those looking for a novel with strong friendships and characters that stick with you long after you close the book.

 

 

Sula by Toni Morrison

In this brilliant novel, Toni Morrison beautifully captures the female experience inside of a short 200-pages. We follow the story of Sula and Nel, two childhood best friends who grow apart in adulthood due to an unforgivable betrayal. This novel shows the unbreakable bond that can last between two women through all the good and bad experiences of life. Sula is a tragic and sometimes upsetting novel that is told with both love and bitterness. Morrison mixes all the messy emotions of life and creates a stunning story that leaves the reader comforted and wounded by its impact. This novel is truly a must-read piece of literature!

By Danielle Gorman / English Intern / Spring 2021
home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Black History Month Book Recommendations

Black History Month Book Recommendations

Just because February is almost over doesn’t mean there isn’t still time to pick up a great read to celebrate Black History Month. This month, at Ellis Library, we are appreciating all the wonderful reads written by Black authors, showcasing Black stories. Here are just a few of our favorite picks you can find available at Mizzou libraries or request through our website. 

 

For the Non-fiction Lovers: 

 

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson          

Told in verse, Brown Girl Dreaming tells the story of author Jacquelin Woodson’s childhood and her experience as a young African American girl growing up in the 1960s. From her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement to her self-discovered love of writing and reading, Woodson crafts beautiful poems that share an emotional and connective journey of self-discovery and adolescence. Brown Girl Dreaming is the perfect read for poetry and auto-biography lovers looking for an embracive and powerful read about a young girl’s coming-of-age.

http://merlin.lib.umsystem.edu:80/record=b10675107~S8

 

Redefining Realness by Janet Mock

This powerful memoir documents the honest journey of writer and activist Janet Mock’s childhood, as we follow her story growing up as a lower-class, multiracial, trans woman in America. Mock captivates the reader with her unapologetic writing as she recounts tales from her experience transitioning as a teenager up into her college years and falling in love for the first time. This memoir is a fascinating read for readers who enjoy powerful and personal stories that leave you feeling inspired and changed for the better. 

 

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

In this moving and gripping memoir, comedian Trevor Noah reflects on his life, as a young boy growing up in apartheid South Africa, to his present-day reality as one of the biggest comedians of his time. Noah begins his story with the event of an unexpected crime: his own birth. Born a Crime is a captivating read about the struggles of finding your identity and place in a world in which you were never supposed to exist. This read is perfect for those looking for an insightful yet humorously told coming-of-age story that leaves you feeling everything from heartbroken to unnerved to fully inspired by Noah’s ability to compose an unforgettable memoir.

 

For the Fiction Lovers: 

 

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

This dark and quick-paced read follows our main character, Korede, who has always felt second to her younger sister, Ayoola. Ayoola is seemingly the perfect daughter, except for one problem—she cannot stop killing her boyfriends, leaving Korede to clean up her mess. My Sister, the Serial Killer, takes the reader on a frightening journey, making you question how far one can go to protect those they love. This novel is perfect for readers looking for a short and fun yet truly haunting read.

 

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates’s best-selling novel is the best pick for readers looking for a challenging yet profound read that will leave you feeling impacted and heartbroken by Coates’s beautiful storytelling. This novel follows Hiram Walker, who was born into slavery; when his mother is sold away, he believes he has truly lost all memories and remains of what he knew of her. Years later, when Hiram experiences a brush with death, in which he only survives because of a strange and magical power he possesses, he wonders if he contains more of his mother than he realizes. This discovery leads him on a dangerous and unexpected journey to find the answers he has always sought and attempt to find and rescue the mother he has not seen since he was young.

 

If Beale Street Could Talk by James Baldwin

In this heartbreaking and beautifully honest novel, by legendary writer James Baldwin, we follow a young artist named Fonny who is unjustly arrested and sent to New York’s notorious “Tombs”. His girlfriend, Tish, who is pregnant with his child, refuses to let him stay locked away and is determined to free him. If Beale Street Could Talk is a powerful novel that addresses necessary and prevalent topics like punishment and crime in America and is perfect for readers looking for an unforgettable classic read.

By Danielle Gorman / English Intern / Spring 2021
home Ellis Library New Food and Drink Policy in Ellis Library

New Food and Drink Policy in Ellis Library

Due to the continued vigilance in requiring everyone on campus to wear masks during the Covid-19 pandemic, Ellis Library is no longer allowing food and drink on any floor above the ground level (near the Bookmark Cafe). All semester there has been a restriction on food above the ground level. Due to ongoing safety concerns for library users and staff, a ban on beverages on all floors except the ground level is now in effect.

Library users may visit the ground level to enjoy snack and beverages. (The Bookmark Cafe is closed for the rest of the semester.) Everyone must continue to wear masks except when they are actively eating or drinking. Thank you for your cooperation in keeping everyone safe and healthy!

home Ellis Library, Hours Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Ellis Library will have limited hours during the Thanksgiving Break. For a complete list of the hours of Ellis Library and the specialized library hours, visit library.missouri.edu/hours.

The Bookmark Cafe, which is run by Campus Dining Services, will be closed the rest of the semester. For a complete list of hours for Campus Dining Services locations, visit dining.missouri.edu/hours.

Ellis Library Hours, November 21 to December 1

Saturday, Sunday (Nov. 21, 22)…..Closed

Monday to Wednesday (Nov. 23 to 25)…..8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thursday to Saturday (Nov. 26 to 28)……Closed

Regular semester hours will resume on Sunday, November 29.

home Ellis Library, Hours Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Ellis Library will have limited hours during the Thanksgiving Break. For a complete list of the hours of Ellis Library and the specialized library hours, visit library.missouri.edu/hours.

The Bookmark Cafe, which is run by Campus Dining Services, will be closed the entire week of Thanksgiving break. For a complete list of hours for Campus Dining Services locations, visit dining.missouri.edu/hours.

Ellis Library Hours, November 21 to December 1

Saturday, Sunday (Nov. 21, 22)…..Closed

Monday to Wednesday (Nov. 23 to 25)…..8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thursday to Saturday (Nov. 26 to 28)……Closed

Library hours after the Thanksgiving break are still being determined.

home Ellis Library Symptom Checks at Entrance to Ellis Library to Start on Oct. 19

Symptom Checks at Entrance to Ellis Library to Start on Oct. 19

Campus Community:

Thank you for your diligence in helping Mizzou curb the number of active COVID-19 cases in our community. In an effort to further encourage this downward trend, we are reminding you to download the #CampusClear app on your smartphone if you haven’t already. Students, staff and faculty are required to monitor their health on a daily basis. The #CampusClear app helps support this healthy habit.

To encourage app usage, the university will begin checking your #CampusClear app with monitoring stations at Ellis Library and MizzouRec beginning Monday, October 19. You will need to show your “Good to Go!” screen at these locations to indicate you are cleared for campus. The university plans to phase in additional screening locations in the coming weeks.

In addition, faculty have been encouraged to take a moment at the beginning of class and remind students to complete symptom monitoring with the #CampusClear app. This practice, along with our monitoring stations, will further reinforce valuable habits that help protect the health and safety of our campus community.

If you are unable to access or use the app, you can complete a manual screening at these locations. The screening will include having your temperature taken and verbally confirming you do not have any symptoms associated with COVID-19. Remember, downloading the app or completing the screening process can take a few extra minutes, so please plan accordingly.

As always, you should maintain social distancing, wear your face covering and follow other Show Me Renewal precautions in addition to monitoring yourself for symptoms. Thank you for doing your part to keep yourself and other members of our campus community safe.

Tigers support Tigers!

 

Mark Diedrich

Incident Commander, MU Incident Command Team

Director of Emergency Management, UM System

 

 

 

 

home Ellis Library, Staff news Microfilm Readers in Ellis Library Available by Appointment

Microfilm Readers in Ellis Library Available by Appointment

Beginning August 17, 2020, reservations are required to use the microfilm machines in Ellis Library room 404.

Schedule a microfilm room reservation

By making an in-person appointment, users agree to follow the University’s safety expectations, including wearing masks, maintaining at least six feet of distance from others, and respecting markings for traffic flow. For more information on using the Libraries this fall, see our reopening plans. As always, don’t hesitate to contact us if you have questions.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Special Collections Open by Appointment Starting August 17

Special Collections Open by Appointment Starting August 17

Research

Beginning August 17, 2020, Special Collections will be open for research by appointment only to MU-affiliated faculty, staff, and students. Reservations are also required to use the microfilm machines in room 404. Appointments should only be made when a digital substitute is not sufficient.

By making an in-person appointment, users agree to follow the University’s safety expectations, including wearing masks, maintaining at least six feet of distance from others, and respecting markings for traffic flow. Users are also required to follow established reading room rules, including thorough handwashing before handling materials.

To make an appointment or request scans, see the Appointments page on the Special Collections website.

Teaching

During the fall 2020 semester, Special Collections instruction will be primarily online. We’ve been working on brand-new digital activities and resources and are eager to support faculty and students through distance education. Contact a librarian about scheduling a class session.

More Information

For more information on using the Libraries this fall, see our reopening plans. As always, don’t hesitate to contact us if you have questions.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

LGBTQ Library Resources at Mizzou

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots. This year marks the 50th anniversary of LGBTQ+ pride traditions.

With Pride Month, we wanted to highlight a few of our guides dedicated to LGBTQ resources. These guides are updated throughout the year.

Our guide, LGBTQ Resources, provides useful resources for research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer issues, and for members, family, and friends of the LGBTQ community. Whether you are a student looking for help with your papers and projects or you are looking for reading recommendations, this guide is a good resource.

If you are interested in LGBTQ health resources, we have a guide that links to community and nationwide resources, as well as books & media recommendations in Mizzou Libraries and beyond.

Not everything on these guides are behind a paywall. If there is a resource you cannot access, we encourage you to look at your local and university library or local bookstore.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.