New Database: Early American Newspapers Series II

MU Libraries is pleased to provide access to Early American Newspapers Series II.

Early American Newspapers Series II adds coverage our existing access and now covers 1690-1900. Images and full-content access to historic newspapers from the 18th to mid-19th Century, based on the collections of the American Antiquarian Society, the Wisconsin Historical Society, and 90 other institutions, from every region of the United States.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, contact your librarian at ask@missouri.libanswers.com.

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Books to Celebrate Disability Culture Month at Mizzou

Books to Celebrate Disability Culture Month at Mizzou

Mizzou began a tradition of celebrating Disability Culture Month, formerly Celebrate Ability Week, every September! Learn about how Mizzou is growing its understanding of disability with our Future is Accessible website, and learn about our rich history of inclusion with our Disability History at Mizzou timeline!

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of recommendations here.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form

Being Heumann recounts Judy Heumann’s lifelong battle to achieve respect, acceptance, and inclusion in society. Paralyzed from polio at eighteen months, Judy’s struggle for equality began early in life. From fighting to attend grade school after being described as a “fire hazard” to later winning a lawsuit against the New York City school system for denying her a teacher’s license because of her paralysis, Judy’s actions set a precedent that fundamentally improved rights for disabled people.

 

 

 

 

Blackness and disability : critical examinations and cultural interventions by Christopher Bell

“Disability Studies diverge from the medical model of disability (which argues that disabled subjects can and should be “fixed”) to view disability as socially constructed, much in the same way other identities are. The work of reading black and disabled bodies is not only recovery work, but work that requires a willingness to deconstruct the systems that would keep those bodies in separate spheres. This pivotal volume uncovers the misrepresentations of black disabled bodies and demonstrates how those bodies transform systems and culture. Drawing on key themes in Disability Studies and African American Studies, these collected essays complement one another in interesting and dynamic ways, to forge connections across genres and chronotopes, an invitation to keep blackness and disability in conversation.

 

Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

In this collection of essays, Lambda Literary Award–winning writer and longtime activist and performance artist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha explores the politics and realities of disability justice, a movement that centers the lives and leadership of sick and disabled queer, trans, Black, and brown people, with knowledge and gifts for all. Care Work is a mapping of access as radical love, a celebration of the work that sick and disabled queer/people of color are doing to find each other and to build power and community, and a tool kit for everyone who wants to build radically resilient, sustainable communities of liberation where no one is left behind. Powerful and passionate, Care Work is a crucial and necessary call to arms.

 

Defying Disability : The Lives and Legacies of Nine Disabled Leaders by Mary Wilkinson

This book tells the stories of nine disabled leaders who, by force of personality and concrete achievement, have made us think differently about disability. Whatever direction they have come from, they share a common will to change society so that disabled people get a fair deal.

 

 

 

 

 

Demystifying Disability : What to Know, What to Say, and How to Be an Ally by Emily Landau

People with disabilities are the world’s largest minority, an estimated 15 percent of the global population. But many of us—disabled and nondisabled alike—don’t know how to act, what to say, or how to be an ally to the disability community. Demystifying Disability is a friendly handbook on the important disability issues you need to know about

 

 

 

 

Disfigured : on fairy tales, disability, and making space by Amanda Leduc

Fairy tales shape how we see the world, so what happens when you identify more with the Beast than Beauty? If every disabled character is mocked and mistreated, how does the Beast ever imagine a happily-ever-after? Amanda Leduc looks at fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm to Disney, showing us how they influence our expectations and behaviour and linking the quest for disability rights to new kinds of stories that celebrate difference.

 

 

 

 

Disability aesthetics by Tobin Siebers

Disability Aesthetics is the first attempt to theorize the representation of disability in modern art and visual culture. It claims that the modern in art is perceived as disability, and that disability is evolving into an aesthetic value in itself. It argues that the essential arguments at the heart of the American culture wars in the late twentieth century involved the rejection of disability both by targeting certain artworks as “sick” and by characterizing these artworks as representative of a sick culture

 

 

 

 

Women, Disability, and Culture by Anna Siri

Women and girls with disabilities find themselves constantly having to deal with multiple, intersectional discrimination due to both their gender and their disability, as well as social conditioning. Indeed, the intersection made up of factors such as race, ethnic origin, social background, cultural substrate, age, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, gender, disability, status as refugee or migrant and others besides, has a multiplying effect that increases discrimination yet further. The book seeks to pay the right attention to the condition of women with disabilities, offering points for reflection, also on the different, often invisible, cultural and social undertones that continue today to feed into prejudicial stereotypes.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

New Database: ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chicago Defender

MU Libraries is pleased to provide access to ProQuest Historical Newspapers Chicago Defender 1909-2010.

ProQuest Historical Newspapers Chicago Defender 1909-2010 adds coverage for 1976-2010 to our existing access to The Chicago Defender (1910-1975). Offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. The collection includes digital reproductions providing access to every page from every available issue.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, contact your librarian at ask@missouri.libanswers.com.

 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Spring Theses and Dissertations Now on MOspace

Spring Theses and Dissertations Now on MOspace

As of now, Spring 2022 theses and dissertations are freely available on MOspace. MOspace is an online repository that permanently houses all theses and dissertations written by MU students. Feel free to view the full collection, which highlights student research back to 1896.

The Spring 2022 batch adds 59 theses and 87 dissertations to our ever-growing collection of online MU scholarship, with an additional 92 items embargoed until 2023-2024.

View the full collection on MOspace.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Resources and Services National Hispanic Heritage Month Book Recommendations

National Hispanic Heritage Month Book Recommendations

September 15th – October 15th is National Hispanic Heritage Month. To celebrate at Mizzou Libraries, we’ve curated a list of books with the help of Mizzou’s Association of Latin@ American Students,  the Cambio Center, and some faculty from the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Thank you to these groups for taking the time to share their expertise and recommendations.

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of book recommendations here.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form.

 

Bless me, Ultima, Rudolfo A. Anaya.

The winner of the Pen Center West Award for Fiction for his unforgettable novel Alburquerque, Anaya is perhaps best loved for his classic bestseller, Bless Me, Ultima… Antonio Marez is six years old when Ultima comes to stay with his family in New Mexico. She is a curandera, one who cures with herbs and magic. Under her wise wing, Tony will probe the family ties that bind and rend him, and he will discover himself in the magical secrets of the pagan past-a mythic legacy as palpable as the Catholicism of Latin America. And at each life turn there is Ultima, who delivered Tony into the world…and will nurture the birth of his soul.

 

Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Gabriel García Márquez 

A man returns to the town where a baffling murder took place 27 years earlier, determined to get to the bottom of the story. Just hours after marrying the beautiful Angela Vicario, everyone agrees, Bayardo San Roman returned his bride in disgrace to her parents. Her distraught family forced her to name her first lover; and her twin brothers announced their intention to murder Santiago Nasar for dishonoring their sister. Yet if everyone knew the murder was going to happen, why did no one intervene to stop it? The more that is learned, the less is understood, and as the story races to its inexplicable conclusion, an entire society–not just a pair of murderers—is put on trial.

 

Borderlands = La frontera, Gloria Anzaldúa 

Rooted in Gloria Anzaldúa’s experience as a Chicana, a lesbian, an activist, and a writer, the essays and poems in this volume challenge how we think about identity. Borderlands/La Frontera remaps our understanding of what a “border” is, presenting it not as a simple divide between here and there, us and them, but as a psychic, social, and cultural terrain that we inhabit, and that inhabits all of us. This 20th anniversary edition features a new introduction comprised of commentaries from writers, teachers, and activists on the legacy of Gloria Anzaldúa’s visionary work.

 

 

Farmworker’s daughter : growing up Mexican in America, Rose Castillo Guilbault

Guilbault was born in Sonora, Mexico in 1952, and in 1957 moved with her recently divorced mother to the U.S., where they settled in California’s Salinas Valley. In this flowing autobiography, she describes her experiences growing up as a Mexican immigrant in a farming community during the 1960s, and the challenges of maintaining a place in her immigrant family homelife while also acculturating to the public/American world around her

 

 

 

Open veins of Latin America ; five centuries of the pillage of a continent, Eduardo Galeano

Rather than chronology, geography, or political successions, Eduardo Galeano has organized the various facets of Latin American history according to the patterns of five centuries of exploitation. Thus he is concerned with gold and silver, cacao and cotton, rubber and coffee, fruit, hides and wool, petroleum, iron, nickel, manganese, copper, aluminum ore, nitrates, and tin. These are the veins which he traces through the body of the entire continent, up to the Rio Grande and throughout the Caribbean, and all the way to their open ends where they empty into the coffers of wealth in the United States and Europe.

Before a mirror : the city / Nancy Morejón ; edited and with an introduction by Juanamaría Cordones-Cook ; translated by David Frye

The African Cuban poet Nancy Morejón set out at a young age to explore the beauty and complexities of the life around and within her. Themes of social and political concern, loyalty, friendship and family, African identity, women’s experiences, and hope for Cuba’s future all found their way into her poems through bold metaphor and tender lyricism. Although Morejón does not sympathize as much with intellectualized feminism as with “street” feminism (the kind that erupts with force as it confronts daily life), her poems illuminate issues in women’s existence. Without intending to, she has revitalized contemporary Caribbean feminist literary discourse. One can find in her work the tensions between colonizer and colonized, dominator and dominated, and at the same time enjoy the sheer beauty of images depicting suffering, strength, and hope.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

All-Gender Restrooms at Mizzou Libraries

Did you know both Ellis Library and the Health Sciences Library have all-gender restrooms? And for our other libraries that don’t, there are several all-gender restrooms located near them. We want Mizzou Libraries to be a welcoming space for students of all gender identities and expressions.

Ellis Library: Rooms 203 & 412

Engineering Library (Lafferre Hall): Room C1211

Geology Library (Geological Sciences Building): Rooms 16, 212A & 315A

Health Sciences Library: Rooms 219 & 220

Journalism Library (Neff Addition & Neff Hall): Rooms 061, 137D & 106

Math Library Mathematical Sciences Building): Room 332

You can find the full list of all gendered restrooms on campus here.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Central and West Stacks Reopening in Ellis Library!

Central and West Stacks Reopening in Ellis Library!

After almost four months of public closure due to a windows replacement project, the Ellis Library Central and West Stacks are now reopen to the public! The 4,300 books stored in boxes during this time have been returned to their rightful spot on the shelves, and most of the other books that were removed to accommodate the construction workers are being returned as well. The catalog has been updated to reflect that all these books are now “available” and ready to use. Any user may now enter these areas, browse the shelves and pull books they want. Or users may continue to place online requests on any MU Libraries book for library staff to retrieve in one to two business days.

In addition, new windows have been installed that are better at protecting the books from the heat and cold of the weather. On this project we replaced 148 windows and restored 44 windows. The new aluminum windows increase energy efficiency, offer improved sound reduction and superior water resistance. We were also able to maintain the aesthetics of the original windows. There are thirty windows that now utilize Spandrel glazing, an application designed to be opaque. We appreciate the patience of our library users while this work was being done to improve Ellis Library.

Questions? Ask for help at the Ellis Library Checkout and Information Desk, which is located on the first floor next to the north entrance (close to Lowry Mall), or email us at ask@missouri.libanswers.com.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services, Staff news Popular Reading Collection Now Available in Ellis Library

Popular Reading Collection Now Available in Ellis Library

Ellis Library isn’t just for study and work anymore. Because the Mizzou community needs leisure reading too, the MU Libraries in partnership with the Daniel Boone Regional Library (DBRL) are proud to announce the debut of a Popular Reading Collection in the Lounge, which is located on the first floor of Ellis Library near the north entrance (access from Lowry Mall).

The Popular Reading Collection consists of books, magazines, comic books and some graphic novels that have been donated from DBRL. Library users may read these materials in the library or take them home. When they are finished, materials should be returned to Ellis Library, the Columbia Public Library, or dropped in any MU Libraries or DBRL bookdrop. The collection will be restocked once a month.

“We have heard from students over the years that they would like access to popular reading materials in Ellis Library. We are so grateful to the Daniel Boone Regional Library for collaborating on this project to make this material available to our users,” said Deb Ward.

The items in this collection are not part of the regular MU Libraries or DBRL circulating collection. You will not be able to search these books in either library’s catalog, and you do not need to check them out.

Follow the MU Libraries on Instagram @mizzou.libraries for updates on what is available in the collection.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Lisa Bartlett on Display in Bookmark Cafe

Lisa Bartlett on Display in Bookmark Cafe

Artwork from local artist Lisa Bartlett is currently on display in Ellis Library in the Bookmark Cafe. You can see Bartlett’s work throughout the fall semester. See Bartlett’s artist statement below.

“Being of a restless, creative nature, I generally have multiple projects going on at once. I bounce between media, and I love to experiment.

I am interested in those who have suffered and yet persevered. I like to honor cultures that have been marginalized. I do this by showing the joy and vibrancy of peoples through color and vibrant brush strokes.

Sometimes I like to paint on very large canvases and include collage and gold leaf in the composition. I also enjoy working in three dimensions using such found objects as old clock cases, broken ceramics, and Victorian hardware. My work often tells a story, since I’m fascinated by human nature and by what history has to teach us. Old photographs, old letters, and other memorabilia are major sources of inspiration.

I’m always looking for new ideas, new construction techniques, and new projects to get excited about. Anything that involves experimentation, anything complicated, and finally just the act of creation itself—that’s what I love.”

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services New VoiceIn: Denmark to Columbia

New VoiceIn: Denmark to Columbia

In this episode, Denmark to Columbia, Elisabeth Ivens talks about her experience as an exchange student at Mizzou. Elisabeth is from Copenhagen, Denmark and an exchange student in School of Journalism. We discuss dorm life, food, and cultural differences in this fun conversation!

Voice In is a podcast about Mizzou students. This project of the Digital Media and Innovation Lab in Ellis Library was created to learn about students’ lives and their relationship to libraries.

Check back on our site every month or subscribe to the podcast on your favorite app!

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.