home Budget, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

This year, the campus is facing the task of reducing our journal costs by $1.2 million for FY2021, which amounts to a 20% reduction.  To stay within our budget, we will need to cancel our “big deals” with Elsevier, Wiley, Springer Nature, Oxford and Sage publishers.   

We are taking a data-driven approach to these painful cuts, focusing on maintaining access to as many as possible of the 2000+ health sciences journals you viewed at least 100 times in 2019.  Journals which cost over $1500 will be subject to additional scrutiny.   

In order to maintain access to as many of the heavily used titles as possible, we will need to rely on pay-per-view and interlibrary loan access to articles in lieu of subscriptions for high cost and low use journals.  Delivery times will vary from 1 hour to a couple of days.

This process is further complicated by several factors:  

  • The sheer number of the titles owned by these publishers, many with impact factors in the top quartile for their discipline
  • Subscription cuts at the UM System level this year; our campus stands to lose access to about 900 journals unless we can make room for them in our budget
  • The lack of pricing transparency from some of these publishers 

These measures will continue to be necessary as long as runaway price increases continue.   These unsustainable price increases have been going on for years.You may recall that we lost 20% of our health sciences journal budget in 2017, which further hampers our ability to absorb this most recent round of cuts.   

Join us at an upcoming forum to learn about some steps you can take to bring prices under control.   

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget Faculty and Graduate Students Invited to Open Meetings About Journal Budget for FY21

Faculty and Graduate Students Invited to Open Meetings About Journal Budget for FY21

Due to increasing costs, the University of Missouri Libraries must reduce collections expenditures significantly this year. We need your cooperation in identifying the resources you rely on most, so we can explore ways to adjust our purchasing over the next few years to better support you. We would like to hear from you, so we are inviting all faculty and graduate students to attend one of these sessions:

Thursday, October 15, 2:00 PM, at https://umsystem.zoom.us/j/96586506251

Wednesday, October 21, 2:00 PM, at https://umsystem.zoom.us/j/93095286723

We have posted additional information on the Libraries’ Collection Development & Management web page, where you can learn more about the issues and leave feedback for us.

We have appreciated the supplemental support from the Provost and the Chancellor in previous years to maintain subscriptions based on research needs and usage. Unfortunately, this year’s funding situation is full of uncertainty. Not only are campus funds falling short, the funding for the subscriptions purchased as a four-campus system has also diminished, and we can no longer commit to the increasing costs of our large journal publisher package subscriptions, i.e. “Big Deals” with the leading publishers: Elsevier, Springer, Wiley, Sage, and Oxford.

Our bundled subscriptions, those that work much like the cable TV bundles, will end December 31st. For 2021, we will shift to a title-by-title selection model. This action will severely reduce our total number of journal subscriptions. Our subject librarians are doing their best to identify the most essential titles to keep, and will consult with interested departments and faculty about these difficult decisions.

Information about the issues and the list of serials to be maintained will be posted on the Libraries’ Collection Development & Management web page. Please be aware that this year’s cut will include highly used journal titles across all disciplines, since we have already made substantial cuts over the preceding several years. We are reducing collection expenditures by $1.2 million, which is approximately 20% of our total collections budget. This action will likely not affect book purchasing because it is a small percentage of the collections budget.

Interlibrary Loan (ILL) and document delivery will remain an effective, efficient means of acquiring materials not held by the Libraries. Most articles requested via ILL are received within one to two business days, but please note that we can experience instances of slower service due to COVID-19 disruptions. We remain committed to obtaining articles for you from all sources, even though this also incurs costs.

The Libraries support collections that are used for teaching, scholarship, research, and professional practice.  The intent is to offer the most comprehensive array of resources that is feasible with our available financial resources. The Libraries Collections Steering Committee and the Subject Selectors meet regularly to deal with the complex issues surrounding the collections that are vital to the success of our students, faculty, researchers, and other professionals in the academic community. Many institutions are experiencing these difficulties, and we continue to monitor national and worldwide trends in open access publishing and library-publisher negotiations to identify opportunities for change.

We share your concerns for ready access to the content you need in order to excel. As in the past, we encourage you to talk with your subject librarian. To ensure that you have the opportunity to learn more about the issues and participate in the conversation, we are scheduling open meetings for you to attend with Matt Martens, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs; Deb Ward, Interim University Librarian; and members of the Libraries Collections Steering Committee.

Lean times can sometimes lead to surprising solutions when people work together.  We look forward to the day when we will have the ability to sustain access to needed collections through new partnerships and new, lower-cost models of published scholarship. Let’s keep the conversation going.

Deb Ward, Interim University Librarian

home Budget, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library No major journal cut for 2018, despite continued increasing journal subscription prices

No major journal cut for 2018, despite continued increasing journal subscription prices

Primarily due to journal price increases, the University Libraries were once again facing a $1.3 million shortfall in the 2018 collections budget.

Thanks to our University Administration, we will be able to avoid a major cut to our journal subscriptions this year.

With annual price increases far exceeding inflation, increasing funds are needed each year just to maintain our existing subscriptions.

Scholarly publishing is big business. Some of these companies are as large as Delta Airlines, and more profitable than Apple. Publisher profits in excess of 30% a year are not uncommon.

Read more about how some researchers are making strides to create a fair and sustainable way to publish their work, and how several of our own University of Missouri faculty are publishing in open access journals, allowing their research to be accessed freely.

 

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget University Libraries spared major cuts to collections

University Libraries spared major cuts to collections

Although University Libraries had planned for a $1.3 million reduction in its collection expenditures for 2017-2018, these cuts will not go forward this year. Because of the huge impact this cut would have had on researchers at MU and the other campuses, the University administration has agreed to cover the Libraries’ collections fund deficit. The Libraries are thankful that this decision was made, and we will continue to make every effort to provide the resources that are most critical to the work of our faculty and students.

This year’s projected $1.3 million cut reflected a reduction in the campus budget and expected journal inflation costs. A cut this large in the Libraries budget would have left us unable to afford journal package deals from major academic publishers, and we would have had to start negotiating the purchase of individual journal titles with reduced collection funds. These actions would have affected all UM system libraries due to cooperative buying agreements between the campuses.

Budget shortfalls of this magnitude have been an ongoing problem for the Libraries. Last fiscal year, the Libraries had a $1.2 million collection cut. This led to a 20% cut to the collection funds of all subject specialists. We also negotiated all of our journal packages down, so that we are receiving fewer journals, primarily in the sciences. In addition, the number of journal titles we rent instead of own was increased. Consequently, we continue to work with faculty and students to maintain access to needed resources through Interlibrary Loan service and increased use of open access.

We are happy to report that our collections will be minimally affected by this year’s budget. Some packages will be re-negotiated, and to balance journal cuts to the sciences made last year, the book funds for the humanities and social sciences are being reduced 20%. However, because the increasing cost of journals is an ongoing issue for the Libraries, the subject specialist librarians will continue to communicate with and ask for input from the faculty and students in their areas. Thank you to everyone who has already provided input on collection decisions and please contact your subject librarian with any questions or concerns.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget, Support the Libraries Budget update and library wish list

Budget update and library wish list

In the midst of dealing with your own budget adjustments, you may be wondering what’s going on with the libraries. At this point, we are planning for a $1.3 million reduction in the materials budget for fiscal year 2018. Having already reduced our staff by 40% in the last decade, we are unable to reduce staffing much more without significant reduction in services. The Collection Steering Committee is in the process of assessing needs and determining our best options for addressing this budget reduction.


We continue to pursue all available options to support the collections and respond to your needs:

  • You may have seen the recent Missourian article about the libraries’ wish list of books that is being shared with the Friends of the Library and other potential donors. Subject librarians compiled this list, drawing from requests received in the past fiscal year. This list will be posted until August 1. You can help us by sharing the link with any you know who would be interested.
  • Although you are welcome to contribute to purchases on the wish list, we encourage you to recommend additional purchases—of any sort–to your subject librarian at any time. We all maintain request lists to draw from as funds become available. We will make every effort to meet your needs as efficiently as we can.
  • We are grateful for our development team and the donors who have given generously.
  • We are thankful for the support we’ve received from students who voted for the Student Services Enhancement Fee. The University Libraries Student Advisory Council will help us invest those funds in student-focused services.
  • We also appreciate departments and faculty who have collaborated with us in funding resources.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Donate to the Special Collections Wish List

In Special Collections, we provide the opportunity to touch history, creating amazing learning experiences for over 1,500 students whose classes visit our reading room each year.  Special Collections is a fantastic resource for teaching at MU!  But don't take our word for it – listen to what the professors have to say:
 

"Students who go on this field trip always do better in the class as a whole than those who miss the field trip. This is the fourth time I've done this and it's very clear that this experience has a significant impact on student engagement and investment."

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"In both classes, students were substantially more enthusiastic about the material, and had a much clearer understanding of where our texts come from and why they are in the sometimes problematic state in which we possess them."

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"Students were very enthusiastic. 'This was the coolest thing ever!' 'I can't believe they let us touch this stuff!' 'This made the books come to life!'"


The Special Collections librarians have created a wish list of books we would have loved to have on hand for these enthusiastic students and faculty, but weren't able to purchase due to budget cuts.  Browse the full list of titles and donate to support teaching and learning at Mizzou.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Budget, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Final impact on the Health Sciences Library of the 1.2 million dollar collections cut

Final impact on the Health Sciences Library of the 1.2 million dollar collections cut

As previously announced, as part of the University Libraries $1.2 million collections cut currently underway, the “big deal” journal packages from Elsevier, Wiley, Springer, and Sage were evaluated and renegotiated. 

That work is now complete, achieving an additional  savings of about $588,000 to count toward the collections cut.   This is the latest is a series of cuts affecting the Health Sciences Library collections

 

What do these cuts mean for the health sciences? 

Delayed access for articles in over 200 journals

As a result of these cuts, instant article access will not be available for over $300,000 in health sciences journals from Wiley, Springer and Sage.  While we will retain online access to back issues for the cancelled titles, articles from 2017 forward will need to be requested via Interlibrary loan.  Most articles arrive within two business days.

 

 Pay more, keep less

Instant access will be maintained to all of the Elsevier titles.  However,  in order to balance the budget, 90 titles  are being converted from purchase to rental access.  Seven of these  titles are health sciences journals.

Despite the loss of permanent archival access to articles in these 90 journals from 2017 forward, the total cost of the Elsevier package  is still over $1 million dollars a year, and will continue to increase by $50,000+ per  year for each of the next 3 years under the terms of the new contract.

 Alternate online access

Despite being removed from their respective packages, we will maintain complete online access to current issues for the following titles through alternate routes:

Clinical Rehabilitation (Sage) 

The Neurohospitalist (Sage)  

Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics (Wiley)

 

What can you do?

Hang on to your author rights when you publish. YOU could be our organization’s best defense against a publishing model in which university faculty give away their work over free, or even pay to have it published, and the libraries must then purchase it back from them at ever-increasing prices.

home Budget Collections Budget Update with Cancellation Lists

Collections Budget Update with Cancellation Lists

Thank you to faculty, students, and staff who contributed to the difficult process of reducing our collections spending in FY17. We have completed the process for this fiscal year.

  • You may review lists of journals cancelled.
  • We stopped ordering books on April 1 and will resume after July 1. Please let your subject librarian know of materials you will need for the summer and early fall as soon as you can.
  • Please be aware especially of how these budget cuts may impact your students as they must rely more on interlibrary loan and MOBIUS for materials. These impacts include:
     

    • waiting for delivery of articles and books from other libraries;
    • shorter loan periods; and
    • stricter overdue fines from other libraries.
  • Although it’s tempting to use informal methods (I can haz pdf, SciHub, etc.) to obtain articles, be aware that these often involve violations of copyright and license agreements, can pose online security issues, and prevent us from knowing what you need. We will deliver materials via interlibrary loan as quickly as possible—and use request data to make future budget decisions.
  • Help us be more aware of what materials are used: please link to articles and other online materials rather than reposting pdfs.
  • Please do not reshelve materials used in the libraries. Just leave them on a table or reshelving area, so we can register that they’ve been used.

Our budget for FY18 is not yet final, but we will be reducing our collections spending again. Our first project towards this reduction will be to review the titles in our package of journals published by the University of Chicago Press (Chicago Complete). To contribute your feedback on these titles, please review the list posted on our Collections Review page. Please contribute feedback by May 30th.

Collections Review Update

We’re completing the collections review project of the fall.

  • We’ll stop receiving many journals in January. You may review lists of the journals cancelled, posted as we complete negotiations with our vendors.
  • The budget for one-time purchases (books, videos, recordings) has also been curtailed. We stop ordering on April 1 and resume after July 1. Please let your subject librarian know of materials you will need for the summer and early fall as soon as you can.
  • Please be aware especially of how these budget cuts may impact your students as they must rely more on interlibrary loan and MOBIUS for materials:

    • waiting for delivery of articles and books from other libraries
    • shorter loan periods and stricter overdue fines from other libraries.
  • Although it’s tempting to use informal methods (I can haz pdf, SciHub, etc.) to obtain articles, be aware that these often involve violations of copyright and license agreements, can pose online security issues, and prevent us from knowing what you need. We will deliver materials via interlibrary loan as quickly as possible—and use request data to make future budget decisions.
  • Help us be more aware of what materials are used: please link to articles and other online materials rather than reposting pdfs.
  • Please do not reshelve materials used in the libraries. Just leave them on a table or reshelving area so we can register that they’ve been used.
home Budget, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Some Taylor & Francis journal prices increasing as much as 25% in 2017

Some Taylor & Francis journal prices increasing as much as 25% in 2017

Pricing for 2017 subscriptions is starting to come in, and once again, their prices are increasing. These journals are among a list of 21 subscriptions that will cost the University Libraries $6000 more in 2017 than a year ago. That's an increase between 15-25%. 

Meanwhile, US inflation for 2017 is projected to be about 2%; nowhere near the average increase of journal subscriptions featured in the list. 

Many disciplines are impacted by these subscription price increases, not just the health sciences:

journals_increaseing_over_15_in_2017_revised2