Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

How does this work? Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads and which countries those downloads come from. Materials freely available on the web often reach a wider audience than those available in high-cost journals. For example, a postprint of the following article was added to MOspace in 2018.

Since the post print was added, the article has 2,398 downloads from all over the world.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your your work using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Increase Your Scholarly Impact: Use the SPARC Author Addendum

Your article was recently accepted for publication and you want to make sure your research has the widest reach and impact. One way to make sure this happens is retaining your author rights.

Traditional publishing agreements sign your copyright away to the publisher, lessening your impact as an author. When you don’t hold your copyright, you might not be allowed to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And depending on what you sign, you aren’t allowed to put your article on your webpage or in an online depository, further limiting your exposure.

So how do you make sure you retain your copyright? Publishing agreements are negotiable. Know your rights and consider using the SPARC author addendum* to modify your agreement. The SPARC author addendum is a free and legal resource that helps you easily modify your publishing agreement.

Need help or have questions? Visit our know your rights guide or contact your subject librarian.

*The Author Addendum is a free resource developed by SPARC in partnership with Creative Commons and Science Commons, established non-profit organizations that offer a range of copyright options for many different creative endeavors.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Retaining Your Author Rights

Don’t Sign Away Your Rights!

Traditional publishers’ agreements often transfer copyright from the author to the publisher, giving them the right to reproduce and redistribute your work.

The most important thing you can do is read your copyright transfer agreement. Don’t like what it says? You can amend the agreements to retain the rights you need to make copies of your work and to share it with others.

Examine your publishers’ agreements

What is the publisher requiring of you? Those agreements that require you to transfer all your rights limit what you can do with your own work—that is, you are no longer the copyright holder.

If your publisher agreement reads something like: “the undersigned authors transfer ownership of copyright, including the right to publish and distribute the work by any means, method, or process whether now known or to be development in the future, to the Publisher,” consider amending the agreement.

Agreements that let you retain control of your work often have phrases like: “I grant the journal a non-exclusive license to publish my work”; “I understand that no rights are transferred to the Journal”; or “I understand that a Creative Commons license will be applied to my work.”

Modify your agreements when needed

Publishing agreements are negotiable. Know your rights and consider using the SPARC author addendum to modify your agreement.

Deposit your work in MOspace

If you’ve retained the right to post to an online archive, submit your work to the MOspace Institutional Repository. An institutional repository, like MOspace, is one of the best ways to disseminate and preserve your work.  As an open access tool, MOspace ensures that current and future generations of scholars benefit by finding your work.

More information on retaining your rights.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Make Your Research Open

At MU Libraries, we’re committed to making access to research more sustainable, affordable and open. And we need your help!

In traditional publishing models, scholars surrender their copyright to commercial publishers in order to disseminate their research findings in scholarly journals. Publishers then sell or rent that same content back to the institution through journal subscriptions—at ever increasing prices. This unsustainable practice costs institutions millions of dollars every year and creates barriers to access for many. Open access publishing encourages scholars to retain their rights and make their work freely available online, increasing the availability and impact of research.  

What You Can Do:  

Retain Your Rights: No matter where you publish, the single most important thing you can do to make scholarly publishing more sustainable and equitable is Retain Your Rights. It’s your copyright – don’t just sign it away! Contracts are often negotiable. And read those agreements: you may have more rights to share your research than you realize.  

Know Your Options: Choose the right venue for your research and know your open access options. If you’re an editor or manuscript reviewer, ask about the journal’s OA options. 

Share Your Work: Deposit your research in MOspace, MU’s Digital Institutional Repository. Submitting your work to MOspace is easy. Just log in with your SSO and complete the Creative Commons license.

Learn More: Talk with your Subject Specialist about open access in your area or request a Zoom workshop for your department, team or lab. 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Open Access Journal Highlight: RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal

Open Access Journal Highlight: RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal

This week is Open Access Week! Open Access Week, a global event now entering its fourteenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research.

This week we are highlighting the completely online and open access journal RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal, founded by Dr. Richard Barohn, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs at the University of Missouri.

Dr. Richard Barohn
Dr. Richard Barohn

Launched back in 2020, RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal is a collaboration with the University of Kansas Libraries that provides researchers in neuromuscular medicine an avenue to publish with no author fees and ownership of their copyright. And there are no subscription fees for readers and libraries. It’s true open access. “We wanted to create a completely new type of publication that we have total control of and for which there was NO CHARGE to readers, libraries, or those submitting papers,” says Dr. Barohn in his inaugural editorial.

In traditional publishing models, researchers surrender their copyright to commercial publishers in order to disseminate their research findings in scholarly journals. Publishers then sell or rent that same content back to the institution through journal subscriptions—at ever increasing prices. An open access journal like RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal keeps research free and open.

Not only was it important to Dr. Barohn that authors retain their copyright, but that young researchers had the opportunity to publish without being taken advantage of by predatory journals. Dr. Barohn stated in his editor’s letter that he “did not want this to be a predatory open access journal that charged excessive fees to publish and preyed on susceptible young investigators who were under pressure to publish at any cost.”

Two University of Missouri medical students also serve as managing editors of RRNMF Neuromuscular: Jihane Oufattole and Breanna Tuheli. Dr. Barohn’s mission is to provide more opportunities for young researchers, specifically women and those from diverse backgrounds, to gain job skills as editors.

Thank you Dr. Barohn for your work in the realm of open access. You’ve shown us what can be accomplished when researchers and libraries work together to make publishing fair and sustainable. If you are interested in learning how to keep your research open, visit our Open Access Guide.

You can read more in Dr. Barohn’s first Letter from the Founding Facilitator.
TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Ellis Library Opens at 4 PM on Sunday Due to a Scheduled Water Outage

Ellis Library Opens at 4 PM on Sunday Due to a Scheduled Water Outage

Ellis Library will experience a water outage on Sunday, October 24, as part of the Hitt Street steam tunnel project. The building will open at 4:00 pm that day instead of noon to accommodate the outage. Ellis Library will be open on Monday as usual, but we will be under a boil advisory that day. Water during the boil advisory can be used for restrooms and washing hands, but is not to be used for drinking. Water fountains (including bottle fillers) will be available after the boil advisory is lifted on Tuesday morning, October 26 (probably after 9:00 am). The Bookmark Café menu will also be limited during the boil advisory.

You may find that the water on Tuesday has a slight cloudy or brown appearance. This is due to sediments in the pipeline, but the water is safe to drink.

home Resources and Services Get Involved with Open Access

Get Involved with Open Access

International Open Access Week is October 25 – 31! This year’s theme is It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.

Heard about Open Access? Now, go a step further and explore your Open Access options:

  • Identify OA journals in your subject area.
  • Explore subject-oriented open repositories.
  • Read the OA policies of journals or publishers for which you edit or review.
  • Check out the attention received by your department in MOSpace, thanks to Open Access. Click on your school/department, scroll to the bottom, and click on “show statistical information.”
  • Install the Open Access or unpaywall buttons for easy access to OA articles.
  • Read how to optimize student publishing.
  • Connect with the OpenCon community.

What is your next step?

Questions about Open Access? Check out our guide or contact your Subject Specialist.

home Resources and Services, Staff news Haunted MU Walking Tour

Haunted MU Walking Tour

Join Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission and Mayor Brian Treece for a ghostly evening walking tour of MU and downtown Columbia on Thursday, October 28th at 7:00 p.m.

Mayor Treece will recount chilling, historic tales of the University campus that are best told after dark. The tour will form at the University of Missouri columns in front of Jesse Hall, and will feature four locations before ending at one of downtown Columbia’s most iconic and historic locations, the Missouri Theater on Ninth Street.

Members of the Historic Preservation Commission will serve as your chaperones during this nighttime tour, and no registration is required. We only suggest that you bring a jacket for the autumn chill, a listening ear for the mayor’s frightening tales, and a bit of courage for what you might learn during the tour.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Resources and Services Help the Libraries Plan for the Future

Help the Libraries Plan for the Future

The MU Libraries are currently engaged in space planning projects in Ellis Library and the specialized libraries. Our goal is to support the needs of the campus community in the years ahead. To aid in our planning, the Libraries are seeking input from MU students, faculty and staff. Survey participants will be asked to respond to questions regarding how they want to use the library and the relative importance of specific space improvement goals.

The survey will take around five minutes to complete. You will also have the option to leave additional comments. Thank you so much for your time and input.

Fill out the MU Libraries Space Planning Survey here.

For more information on library space planning please visit the University Libraries Space Planning webpage.

If you would like more information about the survey, please contact Jeannette Pierce at piercejea@missouri.edu.

home Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Protect Yourself and Your Research from Predatory Journal Publishers

Protect Yourself and Your Research from Predatory Journal Publishers

Predatory publishing doesn’t just take advantage of authors by misrepresenting review, editorial, and fee structures. It also hinders access to the work itself, hurting the overall enterprise of research. The epidemic of predatory journals reached serious enough heights in 2016 that the Federal Trade Commission charged OMICS, one such publisher of hundreds of predatory journals, for its deceptive practices.

“If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” says Janice Dysart, Science Librarian and creator of the Where to Publish Your Research guide. “Be wary of these email solicitations from publishers trying to get you to submit articles to their journals.” She recommends using the Think Check Submit checklist to determine whether a publisher is legitimate.

Anyone can fall victim to predatory journal publishers. Jung Ha-Brookshire, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, College of Human Environmental Sciences, and Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Textile and Apparel Management, relates her experience after a graduate student recommended a journal a few years ago. She says, “I didn’t think twice about it. We submitted our paper and got accepted without any revisions. Then they were asking us to send money somewhere in Pakistan.” She still didn’t realize what was happening because she hadn’t even heard of “predatory journals.”

That all changed about a year later when she learned of a list of predatory journals from her colleagues. “We found out that our journal was on that list,” she says. They tried to withdraw their work from the publication but couldn’t. Because the journal wasn’t legitimate, the article could only be found via the specific URL and not by searching, so they pulled the publication information from their CVs. Jung says, “We had to take that manuscript as a loss because we couldn’t even take that paper to other publishers since, technically, it is already published.”

After that experience, Jung now checks with her subject librarian, Noël Kopriva, every time she encounters a journal she hasn’t heard of, “no matter how good the website looks.” Jung advises, “Be careful with choosing the right journals. Do not get fooled by address, location, a beautiful website, and a wonderful set of editorial board names. Check with your librarian first when in doubt!”

For more information on how to spot predatory journal publishers, see our Where to Publish Your Research guide or contact your subject librarian

Originally published in 2018 by Jen Gravley, Research and Instruction Librarian