home Resources and Services, Special Collections and Archives Celebrating Preservation Week with Digital Services!

Celebrating Preservation Week with Digital Services!

April 24-30, 2022 is Preservation Week!  

 

Digital Services is committed to ensuring long-term preservation of resources. We utilize and promote good preservation practices.

 

What preservation programs take place in Digital Services?
 Two major programs: 

  • Digitization for preservation: We protect fragile and rare materials by creating a digital version of them and providing online access. 
  • Long-term preservation of digital resources: We follow national standards to make sure our digital files remain accessible into the future.  

What formats of materials does Digital Services digitize for preservation purposes?  

We primarily work with books and paper-based materials, including but not limited to maps, posters, manuscripts, scrapbooks, and photographs. Microfilms and slides are digitized from time to time. Currently, we do not digitize audiovisual materials.  

What digital formats does Digital Service preserve in MOspace and MU Digital Library?  

Images, text documents, datasets, and audio and video files.  

Where do the digital items live/get preserve? Are they free to use? 

Learn more about preservation: 

home Resources and Services Countdown to Finals: Chat With the Librarians

Countdown to Finals: Chat With the Librarians

Need research help? Working on your final paper or project? You can ask a librarian for help using our chat service– almost 24 hours a day.

During the day you can chat with Mizzou librarians and library staff. At night, we offer access to a chat reference service called ChatStaff. They will be able to answer most research questions, except for some that are Mizzou-specific.

To access the chat service and see what hours chat reference is available, visit libraryanswers.missouri.edu.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Arab American Heritage from A to H

Arab American Heritage from A to H

In case you missed it, April is Arab American Heritage Month! We’ve put together an A-Z list of music, books, poetry and more to celebrate Arab heritage in the United States. Read the first part of this series and join Mizzou Libraries in supporting Arab American voices.

Rachel Brekhus, Melissa Fayad & Sireen Abayazid (Student worker, DMiL)

 

 

 

Amreeka 

Amreeka is a movie that proves that the American spirit doesn’t come with citizenship papers–it comes from the hearts of the people who live there. A family of immigrants, along with a couple of first-generation American teenagers, finds themselves inexorably caught between their heritage and their new home. Can they unite to make themselves a whole American family, or will the various influences on their lives pull them apart? The award-winning film was directed by Charien Dabis and was released in 2009. 


Anton Abdelahad: “Miserlou”

This is one of the oldest renditions of Miserlou/Misirlou (made famous by Dick Dale and later in Pulp Fiction). The Arabic title translates literally to “Come so I can tell you.”

Anton “Tony” Abdelahad was born in Boston on July 25, 1915, a child of immigrants from Damascus, Syria. Despite being American-born, he quickly developed a passion and a gift for Arabic music. At the age of fifteen, he embarked on his professional career. During the sixty years that followed, Tony performed throughout the United States and Canada, entertaining his countless fans including such notables as King Saud of Saudi Arabia, for whom he performed privately on a number of occasions. From Boston to New York, Detroit to Montreal and beyond, Tony would travel nearly every weekend to perform at haflat (concerts) and mahrajanat (two and three-day music festivals), often accompanied by such legendary violinists as Philip Solomon or Fred Elias, as well as the great Ronnie Kirby on the darbakka (drum). 

 

Balcony on the Moon: Coming of Age in Palestine, Ibtisam Barakat 

Picking up where Ibtisam Barakat’s first memoir, Tasting the Sky, left off, Balcony on the Moon follows her through her childhood and adolescence in Palestine from 1972-1981 in the aftermath of the Six-Day War. This memoir about pursuing dreams in the face of adversity chronicles Ibitsam’s desire to be a writer and shows how she finds inspiration through writing letters to pen pals and from an adult who encourages her to keep at it. But the most surprising turn of all for Ibtisam happens when her mother decides that she would like to seek out an education, too. Enlightening and at times funny, Balcony on the Moon is a not often depicted look at daily life in a politically tumultuous region. — Provided by Publisher

 

Between Arab and White: Race and Ethnicity in the Early Syrian American Diaspora, Sarah M. A. Gualtieri 

This multifaceted study of Syrian immigration to the United States places Syrians–and Arabs more generally–at the center of discussions about race and racial formation from which they have long been marginalized. Between Arab and White focuses on the first wave of Arab immigration and settlement in the United States in the years before World War II, but also continues the story up to the present. It presents an original analysis of the ways in which people mainly from current day Lebanon and Syria–the largest group of Arabic-speaking immigrants before World War II–came to view themselves in racial terms and position themselves within racial hierarchies as part of a broader process of ethnic identity formation.  — Provided by Publisher

 

Beyond Memory: An Anthology of Contemporary Arab American Creative Nonfiction, Pauline Kaldas, Khaled Mattawa 

This anthology brings together the voices of both new and established Arab American writers, creating a compilation of essays and creative nonfiction that reveal the stories of the Arab diaspora. Coming from different countries and religions and including first and second-generation immigrants as well as those whose identities encompass more than a single culture, these writers tell stories that speak to the complexity of the Arab American experience. They travel through time and geography to reveal the circular nature of identity, inviting the reader to enter into an ever evolving landscape. At this point in our history, such stories are urgently needed, and this anthology gives greater insight into the lives of Arab Americans. Entering into these personal stories allows readers to engage with the complexity of the Arab American community. The varied experiences of being an Arab American emerges through these pages with astounding vision. — Provided by publisher

 

Danner, Patsy Ann (Pat) | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives 

Elected to the U.S. House by unseating an eight-term incumbent, Patsy Ann (Pat) Danner carved out a reputation as a moderate, independent Democrat.

Danner became involved in Missouri politics during the 1970s and in 1983 she won election to the Missouri state senate, where she served for a decade. In 1992, Danner was elected to represent Missouri’s 6th congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives, where she served as a moderate-to-conservative Democrat. Much of her legislative work focused on the needs of her district, but she was also a consistent critic of the Clinton administration’s foreign policy, particularly its decision to send in U.S. troops for peacekeeping duty in the Balkans. In 1995 she took to the House Floor to oppose a troop deployment in Bosnia, noting she had “grave reservations” about placing U.S. peacekeepers in harm’s way when neither side in the civil war had yet accepted the terms of a ceasefire. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 1999 and receiving treatment, Danner announced in May 2000 that she would not seek re-election to a fifth term, and left Congress in January 2001. 

Dick Dale: “Nitro”

Richard Anthony Monsour, known professionally as Dick Dale, was an American guitarist and a pioneer of surf music who used Middle Eastern music scales to influence his music. Dale was of Lebanese descent from his father, James Monsour. Leading surf music bands, such as the Beach Boys and the Trashmen were influenced by Dale’s music and featured recordings of his songs on their albums. Dale also worked with inventor Leo Fender to develop new electric amplification technology, including the first 100 guitar amplifier. This song, “Nitro,” is from his 1993 album Tribal Thunder. 

 

Ferras: “Speak In Tongues”

Ferras Alqaisi is an American singer-songwriter of Jordanian and Montenegrin descent. Ferras’ career began in Amman, Jordan where he learned to make music on a small keyboard. He began pursuing a career in music at the age of 17, and made his major record label debut with the album Aliens & Rainbows in 2008. He has been credited as a songwriter to songs by many major artists including Katy Perry, The Chainsmokers and Dua Lipa. This song, Speak in Tongues, is from Ferras’ self-titled EP released in 2014.

 

Guitar Center Sessions: Dick Dale – Misirlou 

This rendition of Misirlou, recorded by Dick Dale in 1962, was used in Quentin Tarantino’s film Pulp Fiction in 1994. Its use to open the film is credited with the revival of the surf music genre in the 1990s. The folk song is popular in Eastern Mediterranean countries, and has origins in the Ottoman Empire. Younger generations may recognize Dale’s riff from the Black Eye’d Peas’s hit song “Pump It.” Another, more traditional version of the song is featured on Dale’s 1993 album Tribal Thunder.

 

Hanine – Arabia, Violin and Dance show 

“The primary idea upon which the video was built was mainly the beat as the music had already been written for a dancer at a club where Hanine used to play the Arabic violin. Upon hearing it, Hanine decided to alter some of its elements, marking a transition from pure dancing beats to a more musical, more oriental violin-oriented piece.”

 

 

home Resources and Services Countdown to Finals: Supplies in the Library

Countdown to Finals: Supplies in the Library

Short on supplies? Mizzou Libraries is here for you!

Need a phone charger or whiteboard markers? Go to the Checkout & Information Desk. Need a place to store your belongings AND charge your devices? Personal storage lockers with USB chargers are now available in Ellis Library, next to the elevators on the main floor. These lockers are free to use, but a Mizzou Tiger Card (MU ID) is required for access.

Need pens, pencils, bluebooks, flash drives, or sticky notes? Checkout the supplies vending machine inside the north entrance of Ellis Library. This is stocked and maintained by the Mizzou Store. If what you are looking for is not in the vending machine, checkout the Mizzou Store. The vending machine accepts fresh bills, coins and student charge with student ID cards issued as of Fall 2017. If issues with the machine arise, please fill out a question/problem form (located on the vending machine) and give to the Check Out and Information desk staff.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Countdown to Finals: Library Account Status

Countdown to Finals: Library Account Status

Every student at Mizzou has many accounts they need to keep track of, and some of those accounts can help you out at the Mizzou Libraries!

Know the status of your Print Quota. Make sure you have money left if you still need to do a lot of printing! If you go over your semester allowance, you can add money to your Tiger card account to pay for additional printing. Unfortunately, student charge is no longer available for this service, so make sure and check your account regularly. To check the status of your Print Quota, click the link and log in with your username and password. You can also request refunds from this site if your print didn’t come out correctly. While you’re at it, make sure to download PrintAnywhere if you haven’t already. If you’ll be in the library, install those printers on your device now to save yourself time.

Another account to keep in mind is your MERLIN Account. This is the account that keeps track of all the books and materials you have checked out from the Mizzou Libraries or MOBIUS. If you have anything checked out through Interlibrary Loan, you can see that information by logging into your separate ILL Account

Additionally, something else you always want to bring with you to the Mizzou Libraries is your Student ID. After 10 pm this is how you are granted access into Ellis Library, and this is also how you check out supplies (i.e., chargers, whiteboard markers, etc.) or use available lockers during all hours that library services are open.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services, Uncategorized Countdown to Finals: Study Spaces

Countdown to Finals: Study Spaces

Before those long hours of studying during finals week, find a study spot at Mizzou Libraries. We have spaces for everyone. If you prefer silence, check out rooms 201 and 202 in Ellis Library. Check out this Ellis Library floorplan to see all the quiet spots. Journalism also has four private personal study pods on the bottom floor that are first come, first served.

If you don’t prefer complete silence, try the Information Commons (or the first main floor of Ellis Library). Or the Bookmark Café on the ground floor for coffee and conversation.

If it’s a group study spot you are searching for, try to reserve one of the group study rooms in either Ellis, Engineering, or Journalism. They can be reserved for up to two hours for each group. Some also have Solstice monitors to help groups studying together share information with one another. Whatever you need, make sure and plan ahead, as rooms fill up quickly! Currently, access to the Health Sciences Library is only accessible to those with badges authorized to enter the School of Medicine and MU Healthcare buildings.

Remember, if your program has its own library, be sure to check out those spaces, as they are often designated specifically for you!

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Countdown to Finals: Library Hours

Countdown to Finals: Library Hours

Before finals week, brush up on the hours the services are open at the Mizzou Libraries. Even though Ellis Library will be open 24/7, starting Sunday April 24th to Friday, May 13th, some services won’t be 24/7.

If you need help, the Ask Here Desk in Ellis is open Monday –Wednesday from 10 am–10 pm, Thursday 10am-7pm,and Sunday 12 am–10 pm. Our peer navigators are here to help! If you can’t make it into the library, you can always chat with a librarian almost 24 hours a day.

If you need to check out materials, the Circulation Desk is open Monday – Thursday 7:30 am – midnight, Friday 7:30 am – 7:00 pm, Saturday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, and Sunday 12:00 pm – 5pm.  However, if you want to check out books, there is a self-checkout machine available at all times. You can ask your other questions here too!

If you need the MU Print and Mail Center for projects or resumes, you can place your order online at ps.missouri.edu, or email them at muprinting@missouri.edu.

The specialized libraries on campus are not open 24/7, so make sure to check their hours. All library hours are available on the Mizzou Libraries homepage.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Chat With the Librarians From Home

Chat With the Librarians From Home

Need research help? Working on your final paper or project? You can ask a librarian for help using our chat service– almost 24 hours a day.

During the day you can chat with Mizzou librarians and library staff. At night, we offer access to a chat reference service called ChatStaff. They will be able to answer most research questions, except for some that are Mizzou-specific.

To access the chat service and see what hours chat reference is available, visit libraryanswers.missouri.edu.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: March 2022

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: March 2022

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri School of Medicine faculty-authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article, “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement vs Supportive Group Therapy for Co-occurring Opioid Misuse and Chronic Pain in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial “ was co-authored by Dr. Brett Froeliger of the Department of Psychiatry. The article was published in JAMA Internal Medicine (impact factor of 21.873 in 2020).

Note that Dr. James Stevermer also had two publications in JAMA as a part of the USPSTF:

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/facpubmonthlyresult/?Month=March&Year=2022

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive. Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.