home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel, Special Collections and Archives Fine Books and Finer Thoughts: Pop-up Exhibit in Ellis Library

Fine Books and Finer Thoughts: Pop-up Exhibit in Ellis Library

Special Collections is celebrating women’s history month with a pop-up exhibit of limited editions of books by women authors, drawn from our collection of books printed by the Limited Editions Club. Each book was designed especially for the Club, which prioritized quality both in terms of their materials and their illustrations, for which they often hired some of the most famous artists of their day: Picasso, Matisse, and Rodin all contributed art the Club.

The books on display will include works by Jane Austen, Louisa May Alcott, and Emily Dickinson. Stop by our table near the Information Commons on Tuesday, March 5 between 11 and 2 to check them out!

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John Henry Adams

John Henry Adams is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. He provides instruction and reference for the history of the book in general, but especially for medieval manuscripts, early European printing, the history of cartography, and English and German literature.

home Resources and Services Special Spaces in Mizzou Libraries: Study Nook

Special Spaces in Mizzou Libraries: Study Nook

Ellis Library is full of study spaces from quiet study to tables in the thick of activity on the first floor. We have the perfect study space for everyone.

One of our favorites, since it was renovated in 2014, is the study nook on the 4th floor of Ellis Library. It’s tucked on the northeast corner of Ellis Library.

You can make use of the smaller cafe type tables, study in one of comfy chairs, or sit at the high top table to look out onto Lowry mall. The view from the windows gives you a nice break from studying if you are a fan of people watching too. And offers plenty of natural light to keep away those winter blues.

Not only do you have access to plenty of study tables, you can make use of the computers in the computer lab and send whatever you need to the printer.

Looking for other study spaces in the library? Make sure you check out our sensory maps to find the best study space for you.

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home Events and Exhibits Black History Month Books Display

Black History Month Books Display

Stroll by Ellis Library to pick up a book from our Black History Month Book Display! Celebrate African American authors, stories, culture and arts and learn the history of the African diaspora. Thanks to Paula Roper, social sciences librarian, for providing a curated lists of books from the library collections for the display.

home Resources and Services Book A Librarian For Research Help

Book A Librarian For Research Help

Whether you are starting your first research project or have written a dozen articles, you can benefit from a consultation with a librarian. It’s free and you can book online in advance according to your schedule.

Librarians can meet with you virtually or in-person.

MU Students can use Canvas to schedule an appointment via MU Connect* and meet with the librarian assigned to your class. Students, if you book a research consultation with a librarian, you can earn a point towards your S.T.A.R. recognition.

MU Faculty and Staff can fill out the form to schedule an appointment.

*What is MU Connect, and how do you use it? Watch this short video to find out and make an appointment today.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Peer Navigator Corner: Understanding Library Layout

Peer Navigator Corner: Understanding Library Layout

Written by: Lorelai Clubb

If you’ve ever taken the elevator in Ellis Library, you may have noticed that they have a unique feature most other elevators do not. In addition to elevator buttons G, 1, 2, and 3, Ellis also has 1R, 2R, 3R and 4R.

While the “R”s may seem complicated, they actually make navigating much easier! Ellis Library elevators don’t just open on one side, but on both sides. Considering how big the library is, the double-sided elevators make it much easier to find materials. “R” actually stands for “rear”, meaning it opens to the south side of the library. This system makes it easier for you to navigate the library’s layout, so you can get closer to your destination faster!

The south side of the library is the side that faces the student center, while the north side is the side that faces Lowry Mall. If you’re unsure which path to take, the Library website has super helpful videos and maps that can walk you through the library to find your study room, books and materials, and different classrooms and spaces. To find these helpful guides, simply visit the Mizzou Library website by typing “Mizzou Library” into the search bar and then visiting the “Maps & Floorplans” tab on the top of the screen.

From there, select Ellis Library as the library you’re looking for, and from there you can select the floor you’d like to visit, the Call Number location guide (with videos), printing locations, and more. The library website is a great resource for just about everything you need.

Still confused? No worries! Visit the “Ask Here” desk run by the Peer Navigators Sunday through Thursday 10am-10pm (12pm-10pm on Sundays). No question is too silly or small, seriously. As students ourselves, we know how confusing the library can be at times, and we are here to help you.

home Resources and Services Which Indigenous Lands Are You On? This Map Will Show You

Which Indigenous Lands Are You On? This Map Will Show You

Native Land Digital is an interactive, global map that provides historical information about Indigenous people, territories, languages and treaties as well as linking to current tribal affiliations.

Users can click on labels across the Americas and around other parts of the globe — or type a specific city, state or zip code into the search box — to see which Indigenous tribes lived where. You can zoom in or out, as well as choose to apply “settler labels” to see how the map corresponds with contemporary state lines. Clicking on the name of each nation brings up links for related reading.

Not only can you use it for personal use, it can also be used as a teaching resource for your courses. Be sure to check out the teacher’s guide on their website. Another nice feature of this interactive map is the app version making it easy to look up what lands you are when traveling.

home Resources and Services Free Equipment Checkout

Free Equipment Checkout

Did you leave your laptop at home? Forgot your phone charger? Need a camera? The Checkout Desk at your library can help you out! Check out the available equipment here. All equipment is available with your student ID. Materials can be renewed in person at the desk. But be careful! There is a $2 fine for every hour it is returned late.

So, the next time you are studying all day at the library and your phone dies, don’t worry! Just head over to the Checkout Desk at your library.

home Events and Exhibits University of Missouri Press: National American Indian Heritage Month Exhibit

University of Missouri Press: National American Indian Heritage Month Exhibit

November is National American Indian Heritage Month and the University of Missouri Press joins in paying tribute to the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans with some of our recently published and backlist books, which are featured on one side of Ellis Library’s 2nd floor display case. These titles include historian Greg Olson’s newest book, Indigenous Missourians: Ancient Societies to the Present and Paul Hillmer and Ryan Bean’s Inappropriation: The Contested Legacy of Y-Indian Guides, in addition to several backlist titles on different indigenous groups and archaeology in Missouri.

On the other side of the display case, we feature books by University of Missouri faculty. From the history of civil rights in Missouri, to the culture of fiddle music in the state, to a fictional journey through a 19th-century United States, these titles demonstrate the breadth and depth of current and former University of Missouri faculty interests. Some of these titles include O America: Discovery in a New Land, a historical novel by William Least Heat-Moon, volumes I and II of A Fire Bell in the Past: The Missouri Crisis at 200 coedited by history professor and Kinder Institute chair, Jeff Pasley, and the three-volume history of fiddling in Missouri by professor emeritus, Howard Marshall.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Special Spaces in Mizzou Libraries: Sensory and Color Accessible Maps

Special Spaces in Mizzou Libraries: Sensory and Color Accessible Maps

Finding the perfect study spot can be difficult in Ellis Library. Some days you need quiet and other days you want to be alone. In order to make finding these spaces easier, we’ve created some sensory maps and color accessible maps.

The color coded sensory maps show where in Ellis Library you can find quiet space, uncrowded spaces, and spaces with natural light on every floor of Ellis Library.

The color accessible maps highlight all the seating options in Ellis Library: regular seating, high/stand up seating, soft seating. It also shows you were the restrooms are located on each floor.

You can access the maps here or you can find them under maps and floorplans on the main library website.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Save a Trip to the Library: Request Scan & Deliver

Save a Trip to the Library: Request Scan & Deliver

If you need journal articles, book chapters, proceedings, technical reports, government documents, and any part of other printed publications found within the libraries, simply request that the item be scanned and delivered to you via email. This includes items in any library building, and our off-site depository.

There are many ways you can request items from the libraries:

  • In our MU Libraries catalog, you can request items we have in print using
  • When searching for articles in databases, you can request a copy throughFindit@MU
  • Fill out the blank interlibrary loan form if you already know what item you are looking for

There is no charge for MU Faculty, Staff, and Students. For more information on our Scan & Deliver service, please visit our Scan & Deliver page.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is the Public Health and Community Engagement Librarian at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri.