home Gateway Carousel HSL, Hours, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Health Sciences Library Thanksgiving Break Hours

Health Sciences Library Thanksgiving Break Hours

Our hours will be different during the Thanksgiving holiday break:

Monday 11/23 10:00am- 6:00pm
Tuesday 11/24: 10:00am- 6:00pm
Wednesday 11/25: 10:00am- 6:00pm
Thursday 11/26: Closed
Friday 11/27: Closed
Saturday 11/28: Closed
Sunday 11/29: Closed

Library hours after the Thanksgiving break are still being determined.

University Libraries Hours

Be safe and have a Happy Thanksgiving Break.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2020

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2020

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Use of Alternative Markers To Assess Glycemia in Chronic Kidney Disease” was co-authored by Dr. Randie Little of the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences. The article was published in Diabetes Care (impact factor of 16.019 in 2019).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/code/facultypubmonthly/faculty_publications.php?Month=October&Year=2020

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library How does the Health Sciences Library Compare with its Peers?

How does the Health Sciences Library Compare with its Peers?

The Health Sciences Library recently gathered statistics to report to the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL).

This association is comprised of the libraries serving the accredited U.S. and Canadian medical schools belonging to or affiliated with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

As was the case in previous surveys, our collections budget lags behind our peer libraries by over a half a million dollars. Our aspirational peers* have about 4 times more money to spend on collections than we do.

This will make it even more challenging to meet our targets for the current campus wide collections cut of  $1.2 million.

We are using a data driven approach to keep the journals you value the most. Send your journal feedback or specific questions about titles to asklibrary@health.missouri.

*Our aspirational peers are University of Florida and SUNY Story Brook

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

In the 1971 MUtation, the yearbook from the School of Medicine, one of our librarians noticed that Dr. Dan Longo was listed as winning an award during Health Sciences Research Day that year. You may recognize Dr. Dan Longo as one of the authors (along with Dr. Anthony Fauci!) of Harrison’s Internal Medicine. We were able to find this information about Dr. Longo all because the yearbook was digitized in MOSpace. Digitizing your work makes it easier for others to find your work.

Are you presenting at Health Sciences Research Day? Add your poster to MOspace to help boost your resume.

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads, and from which countries.

Currently, all Health Sciences Research Day posters in MOspace have a total of 39,061 downloads from over 100 countries worldwide. That’s up from 14,951 from last year.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your poster using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Be An Informed Voter

Be An Informed Voter

Election Day is right around the corner: Tuesday, November 3rd!

How are you supposed to know who and what you can vote for? Where can you get the information you need to make your voting choices?

  1. Find out who or what can you vote for by getting a sample ballot
  2. Research candidates and issues. There are many resources available to help with your research:
    1. Candidate websites
    2. Local news outlets. In Columbia we suggest the Columbia Daily Tribune: Politics and Election Coverage and Columbia Missourian’s Election Coverage
    3. Voting records of the candidates
    4. Judge reviews
    5. Local groups- these might be local organizations, civic groups that organize around a cause, non-profit organizations, or community clubs.
    6. Public libraries. The Daniel Boone Regional Library in Columbia has a great election guide.
  3. Research ballot measures. Read the text of the ballot measure before election day to make sure you understand what it says, and what a YES or NO vote means. As you research the proposal, pay attention to the types of information you are reading.
  4. Ask questions about your research. When you are conducting research keep in mind where the information is coming from. Who is speaking and what are their sources? What’s the bias in the information you are reading? Who paid for this? Whose perspective is this and whose perspective is missing? Can you fact check this?
  5. Make notes and bring them with you to vote. Make sure to double check the rules at your polling place.

Visit the Mizzou Election Hub for resources available to you on campus.

This year, all registered voters in Boone County can vote at Mizzou Arena. Remember that you will need to bring an ID to vote.

Thanks to UMKC Libraries for the inspiration behind this be an informed voter post.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits Collective Voices: Persistent Narratives within Campus Collections

Collective Voices: Persistent Narratives within Campus Collections

Bingham Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Collective Voices: Persistent Narratives within Campus Collections.

Please mask up and come by to see this exciting new exhibition!

  • Runs October 26-November 19
  • Gallery open M-F 8am-5pm

Movements and stories appear and disappear throughout the human timeline, often transformed by subsequent generations. Many of these stories are shared through the lens and voices of underrepresented populations or their allies, in a multitude of forms preserved by archives and collections such as those at the University of Missouri.

Collective Voices includes art, archival, and textile objects from three campus collections—Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection, University Archives, and Special Collections—that reveal historically repeating narratives relevant to today: marginalized voices, Mizzou student activism, civil rights, political tensions, colonialism, LGBTQ+ issues, and climate & environmental concerns. These accounts, while simultaneously local, national and global, emerged as common themes shared across time.

This exhibition is a gathering of these persistent narratives and a reminder that so many voices still need representation and amplification within our campus collections and across cultural institutions. Highlighted are new acquisitions and previously underutilized materials from our collections, reflecting changes in the acquisition processes and guidelines. It is evidence of both progress made and the monumental work to be done.

The Collective Voices curators—Catherine Armbrust (Bingham Gallery), John Fifield-Perez (Special Collections), and Nicole Johnston (Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection) would like to thank Anselm Huelsbergen & Gary Cox at the University Archives for all their assistance gathering images to add depth to this project. And thanks to the gallery assistants for their help in manifesting the show.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Enhance the Visibility of Your Work by Publishing Open Access

Enhance the Visibility of Your Work by Publishing Open Access

This week is Open Access Week! Open Access Week, a global event now entering its tenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

Recently we asked Dr.Julie Kapp, MPH, PhD, FACE, Associate Professor at the School of Medicine why she considers open access when publishing her research.

In July 2019, Dr. Kapp published Kombucha: a systematic review of the empirical evidence of human health benefit as an open access article in Annals of Epidemiology. According to PlumX metrics, the article has been picked up by several news outlets and blogs, mentioned over 500 times on social media, and continues to be the top MU-authored paper on the ScienceDirect website, with over 5565 downloads worldwide.

 

Julie M. Kapp, MPH, PhD.

Why did you choose to publish open access?

I published open access because anyone can access the paper, regardless of institutional affiliation or journal subscriptions. There is a demonstrated citation advantage. Open access also facilitates broader diffusion and dissemination of your ideas inside and outside the academic community. That means it is more accessible to journalists and bloggers who may write about your work. And isn’t the purpose of science to have a broader societal benefit? Open access allows anyone with an interest to learn about your work.

Why was it important despite the fee to move your article out from behind the paywall? Do you see a benefit to having taken the open access route?

For this particular paper, a lot of the interest comes from the topic and the timing of my paper. Still, it being open access no doubt facilitated its accessibility and circulation. This paper was highlighted in Discover Magazine, The New York Times, Yahoo Lifestyle, Psychology Today, an Australian blog, and the official news broadcast of Israel, among other outlets.

Advice to others?

If you have the funding, I would highly recommend open access. If you do not have the funding, our Departments and Schools/Colleges should consider creating resources tagged for open access requests, if we are to be competitive with top schools.

 

Learn how you can take action with Open Access

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2020

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2020

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

Once-daily, subcutaneous vosoritide therapy in children with achondroplasia: a randomised, double-blind, phase 3, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial” was co-authored by Dr. Daniel Hoernschemeyer of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. The article was published in The Lancet  (impact factor of 60.392 in 2019).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/code/facultypubmonthly/faculty_publications.php?Month=September&Year=2020

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Budget, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

Health Sciences Library Budget Update: Data-Driven Approach to Inform 20% Journal Cut

This year, the campus is facing the task of reducing our journal costs by $1.2 million for FY2021, which amounts to a 20% reduction.  To stay within our budget, we will need to cancel our “big deals” with Elsevier, Wiley, Springer Nature, Oxford and Sage publishers.   

We are taking a data-driven approach to these painful cuts, focusing on maintaining access to as many as possible of the 800+ health sciences journals you viewed at least 100 times in 2019.  Journals which cost over $1500 will be subject to additional scrutiny.   

In order to maintain access to as many of the heavily used titles as possible, we will need to rely on pay-per-view and interlibrary loan access to articles in lieu of subscriptions for high cost and low use journals.  Delivery times will vary from 1 hour to a couple of days.

This process is further complicated by several factors:  

  • The sheer number of the titles owned by these publishers, many with impact factors in the top quartile for their discipline
  • Subscription cuts at the UM System level this year; our campus stands to lose access to about 900 journals unless we can make room for them in our budget
  • The lack of pricing transparency from some of these publishers 

These measures will continue to be necessary as long as runaway price increases continue.   These unsustainable price increases have been going on for years.You may recall that we lost 20% of our health sciences journal budget in 2017, which further hampers our ability to absorb this most recent round of cuts.   

Join us at an upcoming forum to learn about some steps you can take to bring prices under control.   

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Databases & Electronic Resources New Database: BCC Research

New Database: BCC Research

Mizzou Libraries now provides online access to BCC Research. This database is replacing Frost and Sullivan (access set to expire December 31st).

BCC Research provides access to market research reports and market forecasting in mostly STEM centered areas – advanced materials, plastics, biotech, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, sensors, chemicals, nanotechnology, and other emerging technologies. Over 250 research reports are published annually.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, you can contact our business librarian Gwen Gray 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.