Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

How does this work? Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads and which countries those downloads come from. Materials freely available on the web often reach a wider audience than those available in high-cost journals. For example, a postprint of the following article was added to MOspace in 2018.

Since the post print was added, the article has 2,398 downloads from all over the world.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your your work using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Marketing Highlight: Open Access Week

Marketing Highlight: Open Access Week

Here were all the posts that were promoted during Open Access Week:

While these were promoted during Open Access Week, they can be shared with your departments anytime. It’s easy to adapt them when you use the engaging emails template. Need help with creating an engaging email, contact Taira Meadowcroft.

If there are other topics you’d the marketing team to promote related to open access, send your ideas to Shannon Cary.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Open Access Week Wrap Up- How Can You Help

Open Access Week Wrap Up- How Can You Help

Last week was Open Access Week. This week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

At MU Libraries, we’re committed to making access to research more sustainable, affordable and open. Throughout the week, we dedicated posts about the different ways you can help with open access as well as highlighted ways open access can help you.

Below is the full list of posts:

Want to lean more? Talk with your Subject Specialist about open access in your area or request a Zoom workshop for your department, team or lab. 

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Increase Your Scholarly Impact: Use the SPARC Author Addendum

Your article was recently accepted for publication and you want to make sure your research has the widest reach and impact. One way to make sure this happens is retaining your author rights.

Traditional publishing agreements sign your copyright away to the publisher, lessening your impact as an author. When you don’t hold your copyright, you might not be allowed to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And depending on what you sign, you aren’t allowed to put your article on your webpage or in an online depository, further limiting your exposure.

So how do you make sure you retain your copyright? Publishing agreements are negotiable. Know your rights and consider using the SPARC author addendum* to modify your agreement. The SPARC author addendum is a free and legal resource that helps you easily modify your publishing agreement.

Need help or have questions? Visit our know your rights guide or contact your subject librarian.

*The Author Addendum is a free resource developed by SPARC in partnership with Creative Commons and Science Commons, established non-profit organizations that offer a range of copyright options for many different creative endeavors.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Retaining Your Author Rights

Don’t Sign Away Your Rights!

Traditional publishers’ agreements often transfer copyright from the author to the publisher, giving them the right to reproduce and redistribute your work.

The most important thing you can do is read your copyright transfer agreement. Don’t like what it says? You can amend the agreements to retain the rights you need to make copies of your work and to share it with others.

Examine your publishers’ agreements

What is the publisher requiring of you? Those agreements that require you to transfer all your rights limit what you can do with your own work—that is, you are no longer the copyright holder.

If your publisher agreement reads something like: “the undersigned authors transfer ownership of copyright, including the right to publish and distribute the work by any means, method, or process whether now known or to be development in the future, to the Publisher,” consider amending the agreement.

Agreements that let you retain control of your work often have phrases like: “I grant the journal a non-exclusive license to publish my work”; “I understand that no rights are transferred to the Journal”; or “I understand that a Creative Commons license will be applied to my work.”

Modify your agreements when needed

Publishing agreements are negotiable. Know your rights and consider using the SPARC author addendum to modify your agreement.

Deposit your work in MOspace

If you’ve retained the right to post to an online archive, submit your work to the MOspace Institutional Repository. An institutional repository, like MOspace, is one of the best ways to disseminate and preserve your work.  As an open access tool, MOspace ensures that current and future generations of scholars benefit by finding your work.

More information on retaining your rights.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Are you presenting at Health Sciences Research Day? Add your poster to MOspace to help boost your resume.

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads, and from which countries.

Currently, all Health Sciences Research Day posters in MOspace have a total of 48,297 downloads from over 100 countries worldwide. That’s up from 39,061 from last year.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your poster using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

November is National Native American Heritage Month. To celebrate at Mizzou Libraries, we’ve curated a list of books with the help of Mizzou’s Four Directions. Thank you to Four Directions for taking the time to share your expertise and recommendations.

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of book recommendations here.

Interested in more than books? Four Directions has compiled a list of resources including podcasts, articles, blogs, etc.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form.

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen Hardcover, Sean Sherman

Here is real food—our indigenous American fruits and vegetables, the wild and foraged ingredients, game and fish. Locally sourced, seasonal, “clean” ingredients and nose-to-tail cooking are nothing new to Sean Sherman, the Oglala Lakota chef and founder of The Sioux Chef. In his breakout book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman shares his approach to creating boldly seasoned foods that are vibrant, healthful, at once elegant and easy.

2018 James Beard Award Winner: Best American Cookbook

 

Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

 

Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction, Grace Dillon 

In this first-ever anthology of Indigenous science fiction Grace Dillon collects some of the finest examples of the craft with contributions by Native American, First Nations, Aboriginal Australian, and New Zealand Maori authors. The collection includes seminal authors such as Gerald Vizenor, historically important contributions often categorized as “magical realism” by authors like Leslie Marmon Silko and Sherman Alexie, and authors more recognizable to science fiction fans like William Sanders and Stephen Graham Jones. Dillon’s engaging introduction situates the pieces in the larger context of science fiction and its conventions.

 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s, Tiffany Midge 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s is a powerful and compelling collection of Tiffany Midge’s musings on life, politics, and identity as a Native woman in America. Artfully blending sly humor, social commentary, and meditations on love and loss, Midge weaves short, standalone musings into a memoir that stares down colonialism while chastising hipsters for abusing pumpkin spice. She explains why she doesn’t like pussy hats, mercilessly dismantles pretendians, and confesses her own struggles with white-bread privilege.

 

 

Bad Indians, Deborah Miranda

This beautiful and devastating book—part tribal history, part lyric and intimate memoir—should be required reading for anyone seeking to learn about California Indian history, past and present. Deborah A. Miranda tells stories of her Ohlone Costanoan Esselen family as well as the experience of California Indians as a whole through oral histories, newspaper clippings, anthropological recordings, personal reflections, and poems. The result is a work of literary art that is wise, angry, and playful all at once, a compilation that will break your heart and teach you to see the world anew

 

 

Braiding Sweetgrass, Robin Wall Kimmerer

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass―offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Make Your Research Open

At MU Libraries, we’re committed to making access to research more sustainable, affordable and open. And we need your help!

In traditional publishing models, scholars surrender their copyright to commercial publishers in order to disseminate their research findings in scholarly journals. Publishers then sell or rent that same content back to the institution through journal subscriptions—at ever increasing prices. This unsustainable practice costs institutions millions of dollars every year and creates barriers to access for many. Open access publishing encourages scholars to retain their rights and make their work freely available online, increasing the availability and impact of research.  

What You Can Do:  

Retain Your Rights: No matter where you publish, the single most important thing you can do to make scholarly publishing more sustainable and equitable is Retain Your Rights. It’s your copyright – don’t just sign it away! Contracts are often negotiable. And read those agreements: you may have more rights to share your research than you realize.  

Know Your Options: Choose the right venue for your research and know your open access options. If you’re an editor or manuscript reviewer, ask about the journal’s OA options. 

Share Your Work: Deposit your research in MOspace, MU’s Digital Institutional Repository. Submitting your work to MOspace is easy. Just log in with your SSO and complete the Creative Commons license.

Learn More: Talk with your Subject Specialist about open access in your area or request a Zoom workshop for your department, team or lab. 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Open Access Journal Highlight: RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal

Open Access Journal Highlight: RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal

This week is Open Access Week! Open Access Week, a global event now entering its fourteenth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research.

This week we are highlighting the completely online and open access journal RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal, founded by Dr. Richard Barohn, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs at the University of Missouri.

Dr. Richard Barohn
Dr. Richard Barohn

Launched back in 2020, RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal is a collaboration with the University of Kansas Libraries that provides researchers in neuromuscular medicine an avenue to publish with no author fees and ownership of their copyright. And there are no subscription fees for readers and libraries. It’s true open access. “We wanted to create a completely new type of publication that we have total control of and for which there was NO CHARGE to readers, libraries, or those submitting papers,” says Dr. Barohn in his inaugural editorial.

In traditional publishing models, researchers surrender their copyright to commercial publishers in order to disseminate their research findings in scholarly journals. Publishers then sell or rent that same content back to the institution through journal subscriptions—at ever increasing prices. An open access journal like RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal keeps research free and open.

Not only was it important to Dr. Barohn that authors retain their copyright, but that young researchers had the opportunity to publish without being taken advantage of by predatory journals. Dr. Barohn stated in his editor’s letter that he “did not want this to be a predatory open access journal that charged excessive fees to publish and preyed on susceptible young investigators who were under pressure to publish at any cost.”

Two University of Missouri medical students also serve as managing editors of RRNMF Neuromuscular: Jihane Oufattole and Breanna Tuheli. Dr. Barohn’s mission is to provide more opportunities for young researchers, specifically women and those from diverse backgrounds, to gain job skills as editors.

Thank you Dr. Barohn for your work in the realm of open access. You’ve shown us what can be accomplished when researchers and libraries work together to make publishing fair and sustainable. If you are interested in learning how to keep your research open, visit our Open Access Guide.

You can read more in Dr. Barohn’s first Letter from the Founding Facilitator.
TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services, Staff news Haunted MU Walking Tour

Haunted MU Walking Tour

Join Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission and Mayor Brian Treece for a ghostly evening walking tour of MU and downtown Columbia on Thursday, October 28th at 7:00 p.m.

Mayor Treece will recount chilling, historic tales of the University campus that are best told after dark. The tour will form at the University of Missouri columns in front of Jesse Hall, and will feature four locations before ending at one of downtown Columbia’s most iconic and historic locations, the Missouri Theater on Ninth Street.

Members of the Historic Preservation Commission will serve as your chaperones during this nighttime tour, and no registration is required. We only suggest that you bring a jacket for the autumn chill, a listening ear for the mayor’s frightening tales, and a bit of courage for what you might learn during the tour.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.