home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Digital Media Lab at Ellis Library

Digital Media Lab at Ellis Library

The Digital Media and Innovation Lab (DMiL) in Ellis Library provides innovative technology and resources for your creative projects.  The DMiL has an Audio Recording Booth, Digital Art Tools, and 3D Scanners in Room 156; interview recording room in Room 157, and a film studio in Room 3E21.

The DMiL is complemented by the Information Commons computers and equipment checkout at the checkout & information desk.  The DMiL is available to students for class or personal projects.

You can make a reservation and check-in or stop by for a consultation in Room 153.

Monday – Thursday: 11:00am – 8:00pm
Friday: 11:00am – 3:00pm
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Questions & Consultation email: ellisdml@missouri.edu

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Free Equipment Checkouts

Did you leave your laptop at home? Forgot your phone charger? Need a camera? The Circulation Desk at your library can help you out! Check out the available equipment here. All equipment is available with your student ID. Materials can be renewed in person at the desk. But be careful! There is a $2 fine for every hour it is returned late.

So, the next time you are studying all day at the library and your phone dies, don’t worry! Just head over to the Circulation Desk at your library.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2022

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2022

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri School of Medicine faculty-authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article, “Stroke Mimics Are Not Benign in Immunocompromised Children” was co-authored by Dr. Alicia Bach of the Department of Child Health. The article was published in Stroke (impact factor of 10.170 in 2021).

Note that Dr. James Stevermer also had publications in JAMA as a member of the USPSTF:

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: https://library.muhealth.org/facpubmonthlyresult/?Month=October&Year=2022

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

New Ebooks at the Heath Sciences Library

Below are a few of the books we’ve recently to our online collection.

Have a purchase recommendation? You can request a book for your teaching or research using this form.

PeriAnesthesia Nursing Core Curriculum E-Book : Preprocedure, Phase I and Phase II PACU Nursing

Prepare to succeed on the CPAN®and CAPA®exams with this authoritative guide from ASPAN! PeriAnesthesia Nursing Core Curriculum, 4th Edition is a comprehensive reference that helps you care for patients before and after anesthesia in all types of settings. Coverage of the full scope of perianesthesia nursing makes it an ideal resource for both inpatient and outpatient care.

 

Applying Conceptual Models of Nursing : Quality Improvement, Research, and Practice

This practical resource for nursing students, educators, researchers, and practitioners provides content about the conceptual models of nursing that are used as organizing frameworks for nursing practice, quality improvement projects, and research

 

 

 

Brain Injury Medicine, Third Edition : Principles and Practice

Universally praised as the gold standard text and go-to clinical reference, the book covers the entire continuum of care from early diagnosis and assessment through acute management, rehabilitation, associated medical and quality of life issues, and functional outcomes.

 

 

 

Self-Management in Chronic Illness : Principles, Practice, and Empowerment Strategies for Better Health

This book, consisting of three parts, provides insights into the aspects of self-management as it relates to its definition and application. It highlights how self-management can be applied to various long-term health conditions, for different populations or target groups and in different contexts.

 

 

 

 

Breastfeeding and Human Lactation

Breastfeeding and Human Lactation, Sixth Edition is the ultimate reference for the latest clinical techniques and research findings that direct evidence-based clinical practice for lactation consultants and specialists. It contains everything a nurse, lactation consultant, midwife, women’s health nurse practitioner, physician assistant, or Ob/Gyn needs to know about the subject.

 

 

 

Acute Care Physical Therapy : A Clinician’s Guide, Second Edition

The goal of Acute Care Physical Therapy: A Clinician’s Guide, Second Edition is to provide the acute care practitioner with the necessary knowledge to improve patients’ structural impairments and activity limitations so they can more successfully participate in life. I

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services New Ebook Highlight: Indigenous Public Health: Improvement Through Community-Engaged Interventions

New Ebook Highlight: Indigenous Public Health: Improvement Through Community-Engaged Interventions

We’ve recently added Indigenous Public Health: Improvement Through Community-Engaged Interventions to our online collection.

Income, education, job security, food and housing, and gender and race are all examples of the social determinants of health. These factors influence the health and well-being of patients, as well as how they interact with health care providers and receive health care, and unfortunately, certain biases can become a barrier to maintaining good health in some communities. Indigenous groups in North America and US-associated Pacific jurisdictions have been subjected to occupation and forced relocation, mandated boarding schools, and other attempts by state and federal governments to eliminate their cultural strengths and resources.

Indigenous Public Health illustrates how successful community engagement strategies, programs, and resources within Indigenous communities have resulted in diverse, successful public health programs, and helped community members overcome barriers to health. Editors Linda Burhansstipanov and Kathryn L. Braun explore the problems that impact engagement efforts, discuss public health topics, acknowledge and honor the strengths of different communities, and emphasize that collaboration and the sharing of resources can only improve lives.

You can access the book online.

home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Resources and Services Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

November is National Native American Heritage Month. To celebrate at Mizzou Libraries, we’ve curated a list of books with the help of Mizzou’s Four Directions. Thank you to Four Directions for taking the time to share your expertise and recommendations.

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of book recommendations here.

Interested in more than books? Four Directions has compiled a list of resources including podcasts, articles, blogs, etc.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form.

Rez Metal : Inside the Navajo Nation Heavy Metal Scenerez metal

Rez Metal captures the creative energy of Indigenous youth culture in the twenty-first century. Bridging communities from disparate corners of Indian Country and across generations, heavy metal has touched a collective nerve on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona in particular. Many cultural leaders—including former Navajo president Russell Begaye—have begun to recognize heavy metal’s ability to inspire Navajo communities facing chronic challenges such as poverty, depression, and addiction. Heavy metal music speaks to the frustrations, fears, trials, and hopes of living in Indian Country.

 

 

My grandfather’s knocking sticks : Ojibwe family life and labor on the reservationgrandfathers knocking sticks

Child uses her grandparents’ story as a gateway into discussion of various kinds of labor and survival in Great Lakes Ojibwe communities, from traditional ricing to opportunistic bootlegging, from healing dances to sustainable fishing. The result is a portrait of daily work and family life on reservations in the first half of the twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

Hollywood’s Indian : the portrayal of the Native American in filmhollywoods indian

The bloodthirsty savage, whooping and screaming and eager to scalp any white man who dared travel west, has been a staple of film since the earliest days of the medium. More recently, Native Americans have frequently been portrayed as environmentally aware, unburdened by the trappings of modern life, with much to teach whites. In this collection of essays, seventeen scholars explore the changing depictions of Hollywood’s Indian and how those representations have reflected larger changes in American society Offering both in-depth analyses of specific films and overviews of the industry’s output, from The Vanishing American (1926) to The Indian in the Cupboard (1995), Hollywood’s Indian provides insightful characterizations of the depiction of Native Americans in film. Taken as a whole the volume explores the many ways in which these portrayals have made an impact on our collective cultural life.

 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s, Tiffany Midge 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s is a powerful and compelling collection of Tiffany Midge’s musings on life, politics, and identity as a Native woman in America. Artfully blending sly humor, social commentary, and meditations on love and loss, Midge weaves short, standalone musings into a memoir that stares down colonialism while chastising hipsters for abusing pumpkin spice. She explains why she doesn’t like pussy hats, mercilessly dismantles pretendians, and confesses her own struggles with white-bread privilege.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services New Book Highlight: Clinical Practice to Academia- A Guide for New and Aspiring Health Professions Faculty

New Book Highlight: Clinical Practice to Academia- A Guide for New and Aspiring Health Professions Faculty

We’ve recently added Clinical Practice to Academia: A Guide for New and Aspiring Health Professions Faculty to our online collection.

Designed to assist health professionals with the transition from a clinical role to a faculty role, Clinical Practice to Academia: A Guide for New and Aspiring Health Professions Faculty provides a comprehensive overview of higher education for new and aspiring faculty across health professions including occupational therapy, physical therapy, athletic training, nursing, speech-language pathology, clinical and diagnostic sciences, and pharmacy.

This practical guide explores the complexities of the faculty role and includes specific strategies related to teaching and learning in the health professions. Written by Dr. Crystal A. Gateley, Clinical Practice to Academia includes an overview of the issues most impacting academics today. Chapters are placed within the context of current health care and higher education settings. Conceptual foundations of teaching and learning are reviewed, and specific strategies for classroom instruction are provided. The text also includes suggestions for ongoing professional development through the first few years and beyond

You can access the book online.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Welcome to Ana Gutierrez-Ramos!

We are pleased to welcome Ana Gutierrez-Ramos to the Health Sciences Library! Ana joined us at the beginning of October and we are so happy to have her here.

Ana is a senior journalism student who is also minoring in political science and middle east studies. When she isn’t working or studying, Ana enjoys creative writing, reading, and spending time with friends and family.

When asked why she liked libraries, Ana said “I like that libraries are a place where curiosity and learning are fostered. When you are in a library you are surrounded by all sorts of knowledge, and it is up to you to discover it and grow.”

Welcome to the Health Sciences Library team, Ana!

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Staff news Staff Development Week – Registration is open!

Staff Development Week – Registration is open!

Great news! Registration is open for Staff Development Week 2022, the semiannual training conference sponsored by the Office of Human Resources. Join us October 31, November 1, 2 and 3 for this professional and personal development opportunity that that has become a valuable resource for participants. Register for any of the 30+ sessions in Percipio now.  You can register for sessions here. 

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services How Do You Benefit From Open Access?

How Do You Benefit From Open Access?

International Open Access Week is October 24-30! This year’s theme is Open For Climate Justice. This year’s theme seeks to encourage connection and collaboration among the climate movement and the international open community. Sharing knowledge is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.

So, what is Open Access? The basic idea of open access is that it makes copyrightable works available without all of the access barriers associated with the “all rights reserved” model. These can take the form of price barriers and permission barriers (1). These barriers affect communities’ abilities to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the world. Openness can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and serve as a means to address the inequities and our response to them.

But how does Open Access benefit you?

  • More exposure for your work; wider collaboration and interdisciplinary engagement: Open Access maximizes the research visibility of your article or journal and helps disseminate your articles more quickly and widely. It makes the content available to those who can’t access research behind a paywall. Research is immediately available without any barriers, and scholars and researchers can build upon this work without any restrictions. Open access enables scholars to work on their research collaboratively on a global scale and helps researchers connect more easily with each other, leading to greater recognition.
  • Increase research impact and citations: SPARC found that there was a citation advantage to articles available through open access.
  • Maintain control: Open Access helps researchers retain the copyright to their work and at the same time ensure people worldwide can access and reuse their research for free. Click here to learn more about retaining your rights.

You are interested in publishing Open Access, but how do you start?

  • Find the open access journals in your subject area by searching the Directory of Open Access Journals. You can also contact your Subject Specialist to help identify the best open access journals in your area to save you time.
  • You can look into MU’s institutional repository, MOSpace, as a place to share your work or explore subject-oriented repositories.
  • If you are a reviewer or editor, make sure to read the Open Access policies of those journals or publishers.
  • Visit our Open Access guide for a more in depth look into the different parts of open access.

(1) Understanding Open Access: When, Why, & How to Make Your Work Openly Accessible

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.