home Resources and Services, Special Collections and Archives Celebrating Preservation Week with Digital Services!

Celebrating Preservation Week with Digital Services!

April 24-30, 2022 is Preservation Week!  

 

Digital Services is committed to ensuring long-term preservation of resources. We utilize and promote good preservation practices.

 

What preservation programs take place in Digital Services?
 Two major programs: 

  • Digitization for preservation: We protect fragile and rare materials by creating a digital version of them and providing online access. 
  • Long-term preservation of digital resources: We follow national standards to make sure our digital files remain accessible into the future.  

What formats of materials does Digital Services digitize for preservation purposes?  

We primarily work with books and paper-based materials, including but not limited to maps, posters, manuscripts, scrapbooks, and photographs. Microfilms and slides are digitized from time to time. Currently, we do not digitize audiovisual materials.  

What digital formats does Digital Service preserve in MOspace and MU Digital Library?  

Images, text documents, datasets, and audio and video files.  

Where do the digital items live/get preserve? Are they free to use? 

Learn more about preservation: 

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections and Archives Partnership Brings Medieval Manuscript Collection into the Digital Age

Partnership Brings Medieval Manuscript Collection into the Digital Age

In Fall 2020, Dr. Brittany Rancour worked with Special Collections to create a digital guide to the Fragmenta Manuscripta collection through a partnership with the Department of Visual Studies. The Fragmenta Manuscripta Collection is a collection of manuscript fragments, most of them from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries, but with materials extending as far back as the eighth century and as recently as the seventeenth century. Dr. Rancour’s project involved updating and expanding the finding aid to provide in-depth descriptions of over 200 manuscript fragments, work that was first started by Nicole Songstad, a graduate research assistant in Special Collections.

Dr. Rancour, now a Visiting Assistant Professor of Humanities at Dixie State University, came to Mizzou as a PhD student in medieval art history and was drawn to Special Collections, specifically because of the assortment of medieval manuscripts. “When the librarians wanted to develop an on-line learning experience for the collection, I jumped at the opportunity to work with the fragments,” says Dr. Rancour.

The fragments are parts of completed manuscripts that include bibles, books of hours, legal texts, and poetry. Over the centuries, people tended to cut fragments from the the original bindings as collectors valued parts of the texts rather than the entire product. The history of the collection begins with John Bagford, an English book collector around the turn of the eighteenth century. Bagford had a collection of manuscript fragments and had ambitions to write a history of the development of printing from handwritten manuscripts to the invention of the moveable type. In an essay dated to 1707, Bagford wrote that the collection was, “perhaps the first of that kind that ever was done in any part of Europe.” You can learn more about the collection here.

Before Dr. Rancour’s work on this project, there was no finding aid at all. “It was all digitized and available on Digital Scriptorium, but it was difficult to find groups of materials. This finding aid has helped staff and patrons tremendously in locating specific items according to various themes – poetry, or sermons, for example. In fact, I used it just last week to find materials for a class,” says Kelli Hansen, Head of Special Collections.

Partnerships between the libraries and different departments on campus open up various opportunities for learning and research. Asked for one piece of advice for those interested in working with the library, Dr. Rancour said, “ask a Special Collections librarian what types of objects are in their collection. It is an excellent collection and has so much to offer to students and others interested in history.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Special Collections and Archives, Staff news Construction in Special Collections

Construction in Special Collections

Researchers, take note: a construction project adjacent to the Special Collections and Archives reading room will mean additional noise and traffic in room 401 over the next few weeks. Please contact us if you would like to schedule an alternative space for your research appointment.

This project will result in upgraded climate control for some of our most vulnerable materials, so please excuse the mess!

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections and Archives, Staff news New Digital Exhibit: Leaders and Heroes 2

New Digital Exhibit: Leaders and Heroes 2

Leaders and Heroes 2: The Arts is Special Collections’ newest digital exhibit, curated by Courtney Gillie and John Henry Adams. A continuation of the 2020 exhibit Leaders and Heroes, we continue to spotlight art, articles, and monographs by historically excluded people. Starting with the LGBTQIA icon Sappho, the exhibit was created to reflect the openly diverse world we live in now. Explore beautiful, hand-crafted wood engravings in Shall we join the ladies? and then dive into the community and culture that expelled Japanese American families built in Tanforan Racetrack horse stalls in Citizen 13660.

Leaders and Heroes exist in good times and bad. Pulling from Mizzou’s many libraries on campus, our further reading section is full of primary and secondary sources for additional contextual information on the history and identity of each fascinating creator featured in Leaders & Heroes 2. We hope you will be entertained by the wit of William Woo and Zora Neale Hurston, moved by the art of Miné Okubo and the Kiowa 5, then inspired by the poetry of Sappho and relentless writings of Lydia Maria Child to advocate yourself.

John Henry Adams

John Henry Adams is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. He provides instruction and reference for the history of the book in general, but especially for medieval manuscripts, early European printing, the history of cartography, and English and German literature.

Glossary of Rare Book Terms Available

Special Collections staff has prepared an illustrated glossary of rare books terms. If you’ve ever wondered about the difference between engraving and etching, or what exactly a nonce volume is, then this is your chance to find out!

The glossary contains 130 definitions and 112 images of examples drawn from Special Collections’ holdings. The glossary was written by John Henry Adams and photographs were taken by John Henry Adams, Courtney Gillie, and Kelli Hansen.

John Henry Adams

John Henry Adams is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. He provides instruction and reference for the history of the book in general, but especially for medieval manuscripts, early European printing, the history of cartography, and English and German literature.

home Special Collections and Archives The Classroom is Open!

The Classroom is Open!

After more than a year of online teaching, we are excited to welcome students and instructors back to in-person sessions in our classroom. A few reminders: 

  • Masks are required in the classroom for all participants. 
  • Thorough handwashing before class is required for all participants.
  • Hand sanitizer may not be used before or during class sessions. Handwashing after class is recommended.  
  • Use our online form to request a session.  

This fall, we are introducing a new online orientation module that students must complete before they visit. This module covers handling guidelines for materials in the classroom and will help students make the most of their time in Special Collections. If you’re teaching a class using Special Collections, please include this module in your syllabus or Canvas site, and require your students to complete it before your class session.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections and Archives, Staff news New Fall Exhibit: Instagram Favorites

New Fall Exhibit: Instagram Favorites

Since 2016, Special Collections has used Instagram to share our collections with the world. To mark our fifth anniversary on the platform, and to welcome students and faculty back to campus, our fall exhibition celebrates two sets of favorite posts.

One of the exhibit cases highlights your favorites: the posts that were the most liked, commented, and interacted with over the past five years. As you will see, there are wonders to discover in Special Collections, from medieval manuscripts to nineteenth-century publisher’s bindings. These posts are just the beginning!

The other exhibit case highlights our favorites: posts chosen by Special Collections and Archives staff.  As these materials show, we envision a future in which Special Collections and Archives foster, reflect and inform an inclusive, diverse, and engaged community, locally and beyond.

This exhibition will be on view in the Ellis Library North Colonnade through fall 2021. For more, make an appointment to visit us in person, or follow us on Instagram.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Hours, Special Collections and Archives Special Collections Open by Appointment Only

Special Collections Open by Appointment Only

In August, the University Archives began the process of moving collections out of Lewis Hall and into Ellis Library. Later this semester, University Archives staff will join Special Collections on the fourth floor and share reading room and office spaces in Ellis Library. Because we are working out the timeline for these moves, the reading room will be open by appointment only until further notice. Microfilm readers in room 404 remain available on an appointment-only basis as well. Schedule research appointments through our website. 

For preservation and space purposes, many nineteenth-century materials and comics from Special Collections are now stored at the University of Missouri Libraries Depository (UMLD). These materials are among the most fragile in the collections, and the UMLD offers a consistent, stable low temperature and humidity that will preserve these materials much more effectively than we can in Ellis Library. To request these materials, simply make a research appointment! Please allow at least two business days for these materials to be made ready for research use. 

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Special Collections and Archives Selections from the Hiller Collection on View in Ellis Library

Selections from the Hiller Collection on View in Ellis Library

Photographs from the Martin and Margaret Hiller Collection of Audiovisual Materials on China are now on view in the North Colonnade exhibit cases in Ellis Library. The Hiller Collection documents cities, industries, farming, and everyday life in China during the second phase of the Chinese Civil War. The collection contains over 1,900 glass and acetate slides, several reels of 16mm film, four reels of 8mm film, and magnetic audio tape created by Army Air Corps Capt. Martin Hiller while stationed with his family in Shanghai, China, from 1945 to 1948. These materials were donated to the University Libraries by the Hiller family in 2018. For more about the collection, see a digital exhibit curated by MU student Yueheng Lyu in 2019.

The images on view were printed from high resolution digital scans of slides created by Martin Hiller. Selections from this collection will remain on view through summer 2021.

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Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections and Archives, Staff news New student-curated online exhibits now available

New student-curated online exhibits now available

There are two new digital exhibits in Special Collections, curated by our spring 2021 interns: John T. McCutcheon: A Cartoonist in his Prime, 1930s, curated by Allison Cathey, and The Art of Cartography, Cartes-à-figures, curated by Lily McEwan. Our students have worked very hard over the past semester on these exhibits and now we’re ready to share them with you. Read on below for our interns’ descriptions of their projects. We hope that you enjoy the exhibits!

John T. McCutcheon: A Cartoonist in his Prime, 1930s

by Allison Cathey

My exhibit is formed around American cartoonist John T. McCutcheon and his work during the peak of his career at the Chicago Tribune. The exhibit showcases 11 of the cartoons that MU Digital Library has access to. The others can be found in the John Tinney McCutcheon Collection of Editorial Cartoons in the MU Digital Library or in person at the Special Collections if you wish to use them for further information.

The exhibit is focused on the use of cartoons in the 1930s during which some consider to be the prime years in John T. McCutcheon’s career as a cartoonist. Amidst the economic struggles of the 1930s, McCutcheon brought light to political, social, and economic issues. His ability to cover a variety of subjects showed his versatility and the reason that people refer to him as the American dean of cartooning. Additionally, in the 1930s McCutcheon was awarded an honorary doctoral degree and Pulitzer Prize for his exceptional work. He spent the last years of the decade beginning his autobiography that reflects on his personal and work life. The exhibit includes cartoons pertaining to McCutcheon’s view on: economics, American holidays, global politics, marriage and divorce, automobile crashes, administrative programs, local news, war, technological advancement, and treaty breaking.

The Art of Cartography: Cartes-à-figures

by Lily McEwan

I chose to create the digital exhibit The Art of Cartography: Cartes-à-figures as a passion project for my interest in art history. As a student studying Art History and Anthropology, I loved the hands-on opportunity to conduct research and over the course of the semester have gained valuable interpretive critical-thinking skills. The creative process and the designing element of an exhibit was a new experience that was thoroughly delightful. I have a new appreciation for librarianship and researchers – as there is a lot that goes on behind the scenes.

My favorite aspect of this experience was visiting the reading room! Seeing with my own eyes these wonderfully old and preserved maps has reconfirmed my interest in Art History and preservation work. I am grateful to have this opportunity as it will help prepare me for a life of research. In fact, this summer I will be attending archaeological field school in Pompeii under the direction of Dr. Kate Trusler for a month-long research endeavor in public sanitation.

I have thoroughly enjoyed my time as in Intern for Ellis Library’s Special Collections Department. I am so grateful to have had the experience in digital exhibition research, writing, and publication. I want to thank John Henry Adams, Kelly Hanson, Anne Stanton, and the entire department of Special Collections for assisting with research, guidance, and allowing me to have this opportunity in exhibition research.

John Henry Adams

John Henry Adams is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. He provides instruction and reference for the history of the book in general, but especially for medieval manuscripts, early European printing, the history of cartography, and English and German literature.