Digital Services Celebrates 10 years of Digitization

We are celebrating ten years of in-house digitization at the University Libraries! During its first ten years, we launched the MU Digital Library, further developed the MOspace Institutional Repository, and joined the HathiTrust (a shared digital library). The thousands of publications we have digitized are online and available for use by people at MU and around the world.

 

The in-house digitization production unit came to the University Libraries in 2011 when the four-campus Library Systems Office was dissolved. While other units in the library were digitizing items for patron services, the new unit focused on the digitization of library materials for broader outreach and for inclusion in MU digital repository systems. The digitization began with two staff members who transferred from the Library Systems Office and two scanners that were inherited from that office. Originally part of the Catalog Department, in the 2013 the digitization unit became part of a new Digital Services Department.

 

The Digital Services Department works with selectors, departments on campus, and others to identify and develop a variety projects that support teaching and research at MU and beyond. Scanning equipment has increased from two to seven scanners allowing the department to digitize a variety of paper material and items on microfilm and slides.

 

As of May, in this fiscal year our staff has digitized 1,266 items, which amounts to 31,500 pages – with a lot more yet to come! Some of our recent notable projects include Venable maps and English Short Title Catalog publications with Special Collections, books on typography with the Journalism Library, Shamrock yearbooks with the Engineering Library, the Muse annual with the Museum of Art and Archaeology, and MU course catalogs with the Office of the Registrar and University Archives.

Cheers to the first 10 years! We look forward to more partnerships and projects in the next 10!

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Resources and Services Learn, Explore, and Perform Text and Data Mining Research With Constellate

Learn, Explore, and Perform Text and Data Mining Research With Constellate

The University of Missouri Libraries currently have Beta access to a new text and data mining service from JSTOR and Portico. This is a new, free tool that enables TDM access to over 30 million journal articles, book chapters, and research reports in the JSTOR and Portico databases. The tool provides online access to a computing environment (Python, jupyter notebooks) for building and analyzing datasets, along with extensively-documented tutorial notebooks and additional learning resources for beginning Python and TDM techniques.

Our access to the beta allows for larger datasets and additional computing resources over the free tier, so to get started visit our guide for up-to-date information, access links, and workshop information.

home Databases & Electronic Resources New Database: BCC Research

New Database: BCC Research

Mizzou Libraries now provides online access to BCC Research. This database is replacing Frost and Sullivan (access set to expire December 31st).

BCC Research provides access to market research reports and market forecasting in mostly STEM centered areas – advanced materials, plastics, biotech, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, sensors, chemicals, nanotechnology, and other emerging technologies. Over 250 research reports are published annually.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, you can contact our business librarian Gwen Gray 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Databases & Electronic Resources MOspace – Available 24/7 

MOspace – Available 24/7 

MOspace is an online repository for the scholarly and creative works of MU faculty, students, and staffMOspace also includes numerous University of Missouri publications from an 1857 list of library publications to the most recent copy of the Mizzou alumni magazine. Most of the resources are freely available on the web. 

Start here: 

Check these out: 

Contribute your works:

Questions? 

home Databases & Electronic Resources How to Find ebooks at Mizzou Libraries

How to Find ebooks at Mizzou Libraries

Mizzou Libraries has access to many ebooks and we have an easy way for you to search for them.

Go to library.missouri.edu, click on the Books & Media tab above the main search box. Type out your topic or the name of the book you are looking for in the search box. Click the search ebooks button (see the image below for an example).

For books in health sciences, take a look at the Health Sciences Library ebook page.

For books in veterinary medicine, take a look at the Zalk Library ebook page.

For books in journalism and communication, take a look at the Journalism Library ebook page.

If you get stuck or have a question, our 24/6 chat is on the right hand side of the screen. We are here for you.

 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Databases & Electronic Resources HathiTrust Temporarily Offers Expanded Access to Digitized Books

HathiTrust Temporarily Offers Expanded Access to Digitized Books

We are pleased to announce that the University of Missouri Libraries now has an additional route for faculty, staff and students to access library books while our doors remain closed. The HathiTrust Digital Library’s Emergency Temporary Access Service (ETAS) is now activated! This allows our users temporary online access to some materials from our print collection.

Here is some important information about using the HathiTrust Digital Libary:

  1. Login with your university ID to see the temporary access materials.
  2. To activate temporary access once logged in you need to click “check out.”  The loan lasts one hour but can be  renewed as long as another user is not trying to access the same material.
  3. Temporary access only permits downloading one page at a time.
  4. Additonal materials (that are not under copyright) with full-text access are always available through HathiTrust. Those items are indicated by “full text” rather than “temporary access.”
  5. Full-text access allows downloading of the entire book.

You can watch this video for help.

For more information see HathiTrust’s ETAS: Information for Users. For your convenience, this and other temporary resources are listed at Open Educational and Research Resources: Complimentary Publisher and Vendor Access During COVID-19 Outbreak.

For more information or assistance finding these and other materials during the library’s building closure, use our Ask a Librarian service or contact your subject specialist.

 

 

 

 

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Government Information State Documents Detail Missouri Beer Production and Consumption from the 1930s to the 1970s

State Documents Detail Missouri Beer Production and Consumption from the 1930s to the 1970s

While their covers and titles can be on the generic side, annual reports of State Agencies are filled with interesting information that can be hard to find anywhere else. A great example of this is the Annual Report of the Department of Liquor Control of the State of Missouri, which has chronicled the production and consumption of alcohol in the Show-Me State for four decades.

The Missouri Department of Liquor Control was established in 1934 with two major functions, the collection of revenue and law enforcement. As such, their annual reports are filled with statistical tables detailing how much beer, wine and liquor was produced in and shipped out of Missouri each year, per capita consumption, types of violations charged and more.

The links below contain samples of some of these fascinating tables from 1938 to 1968, including how many millions of gallons of liquor, beer and wine were consumed per year:

If this just wets your whistle and you want to learn more, visit Government Documents in Ellis Library.

Lindsay Yungbluth

Lindsay Yungbluth is a Library Information Specialist at Ellis Library where she works in Government Documents.

home Databases & Electronic Resources Celebrating Women’s Contributions in the Workforce

Celebrating Women’s Contributions in the Workforce

Celebrate Women’s History Month by exploring women’s contributions in the workforce through MOspace. Here are a few items to get you started:

Women and the newspaper (1924)

Women in the laundry industry in Columbia (1915)

As equals and as sisters : feminism, the labor movement, and the Women’s Trade Union League of New York (1980)

Sisterhood as strategy : the collaborations of American women artists in the gilded age (2018)

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Ellis Library Hidden Gems @ the Library: The Architectural Review

Hidden Gems @ the Library: The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review is “a curated selection of the best architectural ideas in the world to inspire your mind and feed your soul,” as described on their website.  This magazine is a monthly international architectural magazine, which has been published in London since 1896.  It features a collection of significant buildings from around the world, accompanied by critiques, photography, drawings, and technical details.  The Architectural Review also includes commentary that focuses on the history of the buildings, the social impact, and the reasons why certain choices were made.

MU Ellis Library has been collecting the magazine since 1896.  Online access is available for issues after 5/1/1993 and can be accessed here: https://bit.ly/2UIkIWp.  Paper copies are available from 1896-present.  To view the records, please click here: http://merlin.lib.umsystem.edu/record=b1878198.

The December 2018/January 2019 naturally caught our eye because it is the library issue, which features books and buildings, “with pieces exploring the architecture and influence of books as well as libraries and archives from across the world, including the winner of the AR Library awards.”

Their digital content is updated daily and can be viewed at https://www.architectural-review.com/.

home Databases & Electronic Resources New Additions in MOspace Show MU Campus in 1903

New Additions in MOspace Show MU Campus in 1903

A few recent additions in MOspace throw us back to the year of 1903 at the University of Missouri.

A map in the 1903 course catalog shows the locations of buildings on campus. The campus has grown significantly since then!

The Bulletin of the University of Missouri, July 1903 is illustrated with photographs of campus buildings, including those below.

Read Hall, opened in September 1903, was the first dormitory for women at the University of Missouri. “The rooms in Read Hall are single and in suites, and are furnished with single bed, chiffonier, washstand, study table and two chairs for each occupant.” To find out more about other early dormitories and fraternity houses on campus, check out Student homes of the University of Missouri.

Other useful sites:

MU in Brick and mortar

MU map collection in MOspace