home Uncategorized What Happens When Your Library Materials Are Overdue?

What Happens When Your Library Materials Are Overdue?

If items you borrow are overdue, we send you a reminder notice. If you still don’t return them, we send a bill for replacement cost, which is $175 per item. You also won’t be able to place holds or check out anything until either the overdue items are returned or your replacement bill is paid.

Change to library policy due to COVID-19 pandemic: When library materials are returned, they will be placed in quarantine. You will not be assessed fines during the time that a book is being quarantined.

If your overdue book is recalled by another library user, you will be charged $2 per day. If the book is an Interlibrary Loan item, you will be charged $10 per day. You will not be able to borrow anything until you return the item. Again, you will be billed $175 if you do not return the item.

Books borrowed from other libraries through MERLIN or MOBIUS may be subject to overdue fines, which are imposed by those libraries.

More information about library fines, can be found here.

For questions about Ellis Library materials, please contact the Check Out and Information Desk at 573-882-3362.

 

home Uncategorized Masks Available in Ellis Library Vending Machine

Masks Available in Ellis Library Vending Machine

Masks are now available in the Ellis Library vending machine, located on the first floor, by the north entrance.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Track Your Research Impact with Scopus Author Profiles

Track Your Research Impact with Scopus Author Profiles

Defining and managing your online professional identity is often as important as defining and managing your in-person professional identity. One of the ways you can help define an manage your online professional identity is keeping track of your author profiles.

Scopus Author Profiles are a good place to start. Scopus automatically creates a profile for you, based on their database algorithms, and curates a list of your publications, complete with citations and h-index.

Even though the profiles are already created, you should double check your profile every so often to make sure the information (name, affiliation, and publications) is up to date.

Below is what you will see in your Scopus Author Profile.

example of what a scopus profile looks like

The Health Sciences Library librarians recently engaged in projects to look up all author profiles in Scopus for the School of Medicine and School of Health Professions and has shared that information with administration. If you need help with your Scopus author profile, whether that’s updating your profile or providing a citation report, you can email the Health Sciences Library for assistance.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Engineering Library Updates

Starting June 1, Engineering Library staff will be on-site Monday and Wednesday mornings.

While we will still be closed to patrons, having access to our print collection a few mornings a week will allow us to scan items for you in a much more timely fashion! More information on how the University Libraries are expanding services

Need an article from our print collection? Make a request through FindIt@MU or email us at eltc@missouri.edu

Need a book chapter for your students? Email us at eltc@missouri.edu

Ways to contact us:

  • Email eltc@missouri.edu
  • Call 573-882-2379 (we are checking voicemail regularly)
  • Set up a Zoom meeting with Noël

How to access our online resources:

  • Use the links on the Engineering Library home page or from any Libraries page. These links have all been “proxied,” so when you hit a subscribed resource, you’ll be asked to log-in with your SSO.
  • Use the Journal Finder to get to specific journal titles. The Journal Finder will let you know which years are available electronically.
  • Set your Google Scholar settings to show the FindIt@MU link for easy off-campus access to journal articles
  • Use VPN — but use it sparingly. Because of the heavy load to VPN across campus, it’s often quicker to use the links on our home page and proxy in to the library resources.
  • More information on Off-campus Access to Library Resources
  • Note: many libraries around the country are still closed or have very limited access to their print collections. You may experience delays with requests from other libraries.

Temporary access to more electronic journals and books:

  • Many publishers and vendors are lowering their paywalls during the outbreak and/or providing MU with additional electronic access due to our existing relationships with them. See our guide to temporary and expanded access.

Have something checked out from the Libraries?

  • If you have books checked out, please hang on to your books for later return.
  • The Libraries are suspending any billing and fines for overdue materials.

Libraries have a long tradition of providing faculty, students, and staff a welcoming space in which to gather, study, and think. With the unprecedented need to physically distance ourselves from one another while also remaining a connected community, it is difficult for us to close our doors to you. Fortunately, the Libraries also have decades of experience providing online and remote services, and we’re confident that we’ll get through this together.

Please keep in mind that Noël, Michelle, and Mara will be working remotely and that we, like you, are doing our best to take care of ourselves and our families in these strange times.

Erin Go Bragh – Rah for the Engineers

Mara Inge

Mara Inge is a Sr. Library Information Specialist in the Engineering Library. She specializes in outreach activities and facilitates Comic Book Club.

home Uncategorized He Had It Coming: How archives keep giving, almost a century later

He Had It Coming: How archives keep giving, almost a century later

When Marianne Mather visited the archives in the Chicago Tribune, what she found inspired her to co-author a book, “He Had It Coming: Four Murderous Women and the Reporter Who Immortalized Their Stories”

Read more at the Reynolds Journalism Institute blog: He Had It Coming: How archives keep giving, almost a century later

home Uncategorized RJI 2019: Strengthening journalism, connecting with citizens, preserving content and exploring tech

RJI 2019: Strengthening journalism, connecting with citizens, preserving content and exploring tech

As another year ends, the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute reflects on some of its accomplishments and lessons learned with a mission of helping journalism survive and thrive.

Read more at the Reynolds Journalism Institute blog: RJI 2019: Strengthening journalism, connecting with citizens, preserving content and exploring tech

home Uncategorized Print archives show past impeachments. Where will we go to find the history being made today?

Print archives show past impeachments. Where will we go to find the history being made today?

After Trump released a partial transcript of the call with Ukraine, Washington Post readers were treated to an almost exact parallel from 45 years ago. “That time Nixon released doctored transcripts during Watergate.”

Read more at the Reynolds Journalism Institute blog: Print archives show past impeachments. Where will we go to find the history being made today?

home Uncategorized Saving history from disappearing

Saving history from disappearing

The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) and University of Missouri Libraries received a $250,000 grant this fall from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to help ensure the survival of today’s digital news record for future generations.

Read more at the Reynolds Journalism Institute blog: Saving history from disappearing

home Uncategorized Join University Libraries Student Advisory Council (ULSAC) for Open Forums

Join University Libraries Student Advisory Council (ULSAC) for Open Forums

Are you a Mizzou student who has feedback about the Libraries and the ways their services can be enhanced? Come talk with the University Libraries Student Advisory Council (ULSAC) at one of its monthly meetings!

ULSAC is a dedicated group of student leaders who work with Library Administrators to advocate for student concerns. The first thirty minutes of each ULSAC meeting is dedicated to providing all students with an opportunity to talk about their ideas regarding the Libraries.

Fall 2019 meetings are at 5 PM in room 159 in Ellis Library:

  • September 26th
  • October 17th
  • November 7th
  • December 5th

If you have any questions, please contact ULSAC’s adviser, Taira Meadowcroft (meadowcroftt@missouri.edu) or ULSAC’s chair, Mathew Swan (mrs4gb@mail.missouri.edu).

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized RJI Fellow wants to make media, tech companies more aware of need to preserve content

RJI Fellow wants to make media, tech companies more aware of need to preserve content

Nineteen of 21 news outlets weren’t doing anything to archive web content. A lack of awareness and action in this area has driven Neil Mara to leverage his industry experience and contacts to help find archiving solutions for media companies.

Read more at the Reynolds Journalism Institute blog: RJI Fellow wants to make media, tech companies more aware of need to preserve content