home Uncategorized Marketing Highlight: Open Access Week

Marketing Highlight: Open Access Week

Here were all the posts that were promoted during Open Access Week:

While these were promoted during Open Access Week, they can be shared with your departments anytime. It’s easy to adapt them when you use the engaging emails template. Need help with creating an engaging email, contact Taira Meadowcroft.

If there are other topics you’d the marketing team to promote related to open access, send your ideas to Shannon Cary.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Open Access Week Wrap Up- How Can You Help

Open Access Week Wrap Up- How Can You Help

Last week was Open Access Week. This week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

At MU Libraries, we’re committed to making access to research more sustainable, affordable and open. Throughout the week, we dedicated posts about the different ways you can help with open access as well as highlighted ways open access can help you.

Below is the full list of posts:

Want to lean more? Talk with your Subject Specialist about open access in your area or request a Zoom workshop for your department, team or lab. 

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Are you presenting at Health Sciences Research Day? Add your poster to MOspace to help boost your resume.

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads, and from which countries.

Currently, all Health Sciences Research Day posters in MOspace have a total of 48,297 downloads from over 100 countries worldwide. That’s up from 39,061 from last year.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your poster using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Uncategorized Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

Native American Heritage Month Book Recommendations

November is National Native American Heritage Month. To celebrate at Mizzou Libraries, we’ve curated a list of books with the help of Mizzou’s Four Directions. Thank you to Four Directions for taking the time to share your expertise and recommendations.

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of book recommendations here.

Interested in more than books? Four Directions has compiled a list of resources including podcasts, articles, blogs, etc.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form.

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen Hardcover, Sean Sherman

Here is real food—our indigenous American fruits and vegetables, the wild and foraged ingredients, game and fish. Locally sourced, seasonal, “clean” ingredients and nose-to-tail cooking are nothing new to Sean Sherman, the Oglala Lakota chef and founder of The Sioux Chef. In his breakout book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman shares his approach to creating boldly seasoned foods that are vibrant, healthful, at once elegant and easy.

2018 James Beard Award Winner: Best American Cookbook

 

Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

 

Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction, Grace Dillon 

In this first-ever anthology of Indigenous science fiction Grace Dillon collects some of the finest examples of the craft with contributions by Native American, First Nations, Aboriginal Australian, and New Zealand Maori authors. The collection includes seminal authors such as Gerald Vizenor, historically important contributions often categorized as “magical realism” by authors like Leslie Marmon Silko and Sherman Alexie, and authors more recognizable to science fiction fans like William Sanders and Stephen Graham Jones. Dillon’s engaging introduction situates the pieces in the larger context of science fiction and its conventions.

 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s, Tiffany Midge 

Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s is a powerful and compelling collection of Tiffany Midge’s musings on life, politics, and identity as a Native woman in America. Artfully blending sly humor, social commentary, and meditations on love and loss, Midge weaves short, standalone musings into a memoir that stares down colonialism while chastising hipsters for abusing pumpkin spice. She explains why she doesn’t like pussy hats, mercilessly dismantles pretendians, and confesses her own struggles with white-bread privilege.

 

 

Bad Indians, Deborah Miranda

This beautiful and devastating book—part tribal history, part lyric and intimate memoir—should be required reading for anyone seeking to learn about California Indian history, past and present. Deborah A. Miranda tells stories of her Ohlone Costanoan Esselen family as well as the experience of California Indians as a whole through oral histories, newspaper clippings, anthropological recordings, personal reflections, and poems. The result is a work of literary art that is wise, angry, and playful all at once, a compilation that will break your heart and teach you to see the world anew

 

 

Braiding Sweetgrass, Robin Wall Kimmerer

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass―offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Uncategorized, Workshops Welcome to the Libraries: An Introduction for Savvy Student Scholars

Welcome to the Libraries: An Introduction for Savvy Student Scholars

Date: Tuesday, November 2, 2021
Time: Noon – 1:00pm
Register for online workshop.

Hey, undergraduates and grad students: set yourself up for success with this introduction to the University of Missouri Libraries! Get the basics on our locations, services, and collections, and learn some handy tips, tricks, and tools for getting started with college-level research. Ask questions, get answers!

home Uncategorized Library Services Overview

Library Services Overview

University Libraries Services at-a-glance

Engineering Library Fall Hours

The Engineering Library & Technology Commons will have the following hours for Fall Semester 2021:

August 23rd – December 17th:

Monday – Thursday: 8am – 10pm
Friday: 8am – 5pm
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: 1pm – 10pm

We will be closed Saturday, September 4th – Monday, September 6th for the Labor Day holiday.

Please check our hours page for current library hours.

We are available via email at eltc@missouri.edu and our Ask A Librarian page.

Patrons are encouraged to wear masks while in the library. MU requires all unvaccinated faculty, staff, students and visitors to wear masks in indoor spaces.

Masks will be required in study rooms when social distancing is not possible.

Mara Inge

Mara Inge is a Sr. Library Information Specialist in the Engineering Library. She specializes in outreach activities and works with the Department of Energy microfiche collection.

home Uncategorized The Mizzou Libraries Are Here for You

The Mizzou Libraries Are Here for You

Whether you want research help in person while social distancing or remotely from the safety and comfort of your home, the Mizzou Libraries will stay connected with you!

Many library services — including consultations and assistance, library instruction, reserves and events — will continue remotely online through the summer with some in-person options. The emphasis on remote library services will allow faculty and students to continue their work, regardless of location.

Among the changes that library users will continue to find this semester:

  • Everyone in library buildings will need to wear a face mask and maintain 6 feet of physical distancing. Library users may only remove their mask while eating at the Bookmark Cafe on the ground floor. (This University policy does not make an exception for individuals who have received the vaccine.)
  • An MU ID will be required to access the building after 5 pm.
  • For a complete listing of intersession and summer session hours, visit library.missouri.edu/hours.
  • The Check-Out & Information Desk on the north side of the first floor will serve as a single service desk for assistance in the library. Visit Ask the Librarians! for online help or to schedule a consultation.
  • Furniture and computer workstations will be spread out in order to ensure physical distancing. The library’s Safety Team will monitor the building to make sure all library users are being safe. Library patrons are asked not to move furniture.
  • Study rooms will be single occupancy only. Library patrons must use masks in study rooms and keep doors open for proper ventilation. You can reserve a study room through the online reservation system. We encourage study groups to meet on Zoom or other online platforms. If you need a space to do in-person group work, you many use rooms 114 and 114A. The furniture is set up for groups to work while maintaining proper distances.
  • The ground floor and 1st floors of Ellis Library have been designated as “quiet conversation allowed” for library users, including students who need to attend their online classes in the library. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors are designated as quiet study space.
  • The west stacks are closed. To request books or other items, please place an online request and the library will retrieve them for you.
  • Library materials may be quarantined when they are returned, and the items may stay on your library account during that time. No fines will be assessed for items that are in quarantine.
  • Food and drink will only be allowed on the ground floor of the library. Masks must be worn on the ground floor unless the user is actively eating or drinking.
  • DigiPrint services has moved out of Ellis Library and is now located in MU Student Center Room 1212A

Library personnel will carefully assess how the new service models are working and will determine whether services can be gradually scaled up or, conversely, whether conditions will require a return to delivering more services remotely. For the latest information on library services and hours, visit library.missouri.edu. You may also subscribe to one of our weekly email newsletters to stay up to date.

Additional Information Regarding Specialized Libraries
Zalk Veterinary Medical Library

J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library

Engineering Library and Technology Commons

Journalism Library

Five Must-Read Poetry Books

From Milk and Honey to Robert Frost, what are your thoughts about poetry? It tends to be one of those genres that stirs a lot of debate. You either love it or hate it. I think poetry gets a reputation that it doesn’t deserve. Sure, there are a lot of poetry books out there that are not worth my recommendation, but with every not-so-good collection, you also have a great one. So, this month for National Poetry Month, I’m counting down the top five must-read poetry books that you can find at your Mizzou libraries! This list contains recommendations perfect for fans of the classics, fans of contemporary, or just readers who don’t know where to begin. Be sure to check out one of these books before April ends!

 

 

Crush, Richard Siken

The 2004 winner of the Yale Younger Poets Prize, Crush, is an impressive collection of poems centering around the obsession that can come from being in love. Siken is a master at his craft and an expert at capturing vulnerability to its core, as he creates a series of work that leaves you feeling every raw emotion written on the page. This collection is filled with yearning, heartbreak, and violent imagery that will stay with you long after you finish and is a must-read for lovers of more popular and contemporary poetry.

 

 

Envelope Poems, Emily Dickinson

Envelope Poems is a collection of work from legendary poet Emily Dickinson written on the actual scraps of paper she originally wrote on! Since Dickinson has only a small amount of her work published, this book is filled with beautiful poems that give the reader the ability to escape into Dickinson’s mind and witness her exact scribbles of these poems. This is an excellent collection for beginners or readers who are intimidated by classics and is a fascinating binding of Dickinson’s work that will leave you marveling at her envelope poems. 

 

 

Native Guard, Natasha Tretheway

2007 Pulitzer Prize winner Native Guard is a story that honors Natasha Tretheway’s mother’s life as well as her childhood. This book of poetry is heartbreaking and sometimes troubling to read as Tretheway confronts the racial history of the South and the story of one of the first black regiments, the Native Guard, who were called to serve in the Civil War. Natasha Tretheway is a natural writer, composing poems that leave the reader feeling heartbroken and impacted by her words. This is a must-read collection for those looking for poems that will leave a lasting impression!

 

 

The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou, Maya Angelou

In her lifetime, Maya Angelou left her mark on the world by capturing the most vulnerable feelings of being human and putting them into words. Discussing topics from the African American experience to womanhood to the trials and tribulations of love and pain, Angelou inspired and healed her readers with her poems. This is a stunning collection filled with all of Angelou’s most powerful and prominent poems like “Still I Rise” and “On the Pulse of Morning” and is a must-read for fans or readers looking for a beautiful collection of poetry to try out!

 


Ariel: The Restored Edition, Sylvia Plath

After she died in 1963, Sylvia Plath left behind a legacy of being one of the most prominent writers of her time and also a collection of poems called Ariel. In 1965, two years after her death, Plath’s work was finally published and went on to receive worldwide acclaim for her confessional and vulnerable words. However, due to editing by her husband, this original edition was highly inaccurate to Plath’s vision of her collection, and it wasn’t until 2004 that Ariel was able to be restored and published true to Plath’s desires. Ariel: The Restored Edition is a brilliant and thought-provoking collection of poetry that highlights the talent and struggles of the famous poet and is sure to leave the reader enthralled by Plath’s genius writing.

 

Danielle Gorman / English Intern / Spring 2021

home Newsletter, Uncategorized Mara’s Book Nook

Mara’s Book Nook

Panaceia’s Daughters by Alisha Rankin.  Panaceia’s Daughters provides the first book-length study of noblewomen’s healing activities in early modern Europe. Drawing on rich archival sources, Alisha Rankin demonstrates that numerous German noblewomen were deeply involved in making medicines and recommending them to patients, and many gained widespread fame for their remedies. Turning a common historical argument on its head, Rankin maintains that noblewomen’s pharmacy came to prominence not in spite of their gender but because of it.

R 146 .R36 2013

 

 

 

Mara Inge

Mara Inge is a Sr. Library Information Specialist in the Engineering Library. She specializes in outreach activities and works with the Department of Energy microfiche collection.