home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel ELTC, Gateway Carousel HSL, Workshops PowerNotes: Organize and Write While You Research

PowerNotes: Organize and Write While You Research

Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2022
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
Location: 114A Ellis Library
Register here.

or

Date: Thursday, October 13, 2022
Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Online viz Aoom
Register here.

The PowerNotes browser extension allows you to automatically capture text, take notes, and export citations in an outline format, all without ever leaving the article PDF or website you’re currently reading. Designed to seamlessly integrate research into writing, the outline you build in PowerNotes while researching can be exported into either a Word document or Excel file (perfect for those systematic review tables). This workshop will focus on learning the basics of PowerNotes, identifying ways that it can make your research and writing easier. It will also briefly touch on ways this tool can be used for instruction, helping guide your students through interaction with readings and source material.

Please bring your laptop if you are attending the in person session.

Where to Publish Your Research

Date: Wednesday, October 12, 2022
Time: 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Register for online workshop.

You’ve done the research; now make sure your work gets noticed and makes an impact! Learn how to identify publishing venues, evaluate journals, and avoid “predatory publishers,” so that your research gets the visibility it deserves.

Presented by Janice Dysart, Research and Instructional Services Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Increase Your Research Impact Through Open Access Publishing

Increase Your Research Impact Through Open Access Publishing

A great way to increase the readership of your research is to ensure it is easily accessible and affordable. You can publish research open access or if you’ve retained your rights, you can deposit your work into MOspace. MOspace is Mizzou’s institutional repository, depositing work into MOspace gives you a permanent record of your work and is free to access. Learn more about MOspace.

Ensuring that your work is easily accessible allows more people to access, read, and discuss your work.

How To Make Your Work Open:  

Retain Your Rights: No matter where you publish, the single most important thing you can do to remain in control of your impact is Retain Your Rights. It’s your copyright – don’t just sign it away! Contracts are often negotiable. And read those agreements: you may have more rights to share your research than you realize.  

Know Your Options: Choose the right venue for your research and know your open access options.

Share Your Work: Deposit your research in MOspace, MU’s Digital Institutional Repository. Submitting your work to MOspace is easy. Just log in with your SSO and complete the Creative Commons license.

Are you curious about open access and repositories? Contact us!

New Database: Early American Newspapers Series II

MU Libraries is pleased to provide access to Early American Newspapers Series II.

Early American Newspapers Series II adds coverage our existing access and now covers 1690-1900. Images and full-content access to historic newspapers from the 18th to mid-19th Century, based on the collections of the American Antiquarian Society, the Wisconsin Historical Society, and 90 other institutions, from every region of the United States.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, contact your librarian at ask@missouri.libanswers.com.

 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Algorithms, Big Data and Bias

Date: Thursday, October 6, 2022
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
Location: 114A Ellis Library
Register here.

Algorithms are computer code written by people, and humans can unknowingly introduce bias into their programming. These algorithms determine the results in your Google searches, shopping results and even in library databases. Results are ordered by “relevance” according to the rules set by these algorithms. Algorithms determine who should get hired, our ability to get a mortgage, and what type of political news we see on our social media feed. Learn how they affect your decisions and how you can combat their influence.

Presented by Sandy Schiefer, Journalism Research & Digital Access Librarian

Visit library.missouri.edu/workshops for a complete list of library workshops.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Resources and Services Books to Celebrate Disability Culture Month at Mizzou

Books to Celebrate Disability Culture Month at Mizzou

Mizzou began a tradition of celebrating Disability Culture Month, formerly Celebrate Ability Week, every September! Learn about how Mizzou is growing its understanding of disability with our Future is Accessible website, and learn about our rich history of inclusion with our Disability History at Mizzou timeline!

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of recommendations here.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form

Being Heumann recounts Judy Heumann’s lifelong battle to achieve respect, acceptance, and inclusion in society. Paralyzed from polio at eighteen months, Judy’s struggle for equality began early in life. From fighting to attend grade school after being described as a “fire hazard” to later winning a lawsuit against the New York City school system for denying her a teacher’s license because of her paralysis, Judy’s actions set a precedent that fundamentally improved rights for disabled people.

 

 

 

 

Blackness and disability : critical examinations and cultural interventions by Christopher Bell

“Disability Studies diverge from the medical model of disability (which argues that disabled subjects can and should be “fixed”) to view disability as socially constructed, much in the same way other identities are. The work of reading black and disabled bodies is not only recovery work, but work that requires a willingness to deconstruct the systems that would keep those bodies in separate spheres. This pivotal volume uncovers the misrepresentations of black disabled bodies and demonstrates how those bodies transform systems and culture. Drawing on key themes in Disability Studies and African American Studies, these collected essays complement one another in interesting and dynamic ways, to forge connections across genres and chronotopes, an invitation to keep blackness and disability in conversation.

 

Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

In this collection of essays, Lambda Literary Award–winning writer and longtime activist and performance artist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha explores the politics and realities of disability justice, a movement that centers the lives and leadership of sick and disabled queer, trans, Black, and brown people, with knowledge and gifts for all. Care Work is a mapping of access as radical love, a celebration of the work that sick and disabled queer/people of color are doing to find each other and to build power and community, and a tool kit for everyone who wants to build radically resilient, sustainable communities of liberation where no one is left behind. Powerful and passionate, Care Work is a crucial and necessary call to arms.

 

Defying Disability : The Lives and Legacies of Nine Disabled Leaders by Mary Wilkinson

This book tells the stories of nine disabled leaders who, by force of personality and concrete achievement, have made us think differently about disability. Whatever direction they have come from, they share a common will to change society so that disabled people get a fair deal.

 

 

 

 

 

Demystifying Disability : What to Know, What to Say, and How to Be an Ally by Emily Landau

People with disabilities are the world’s largest minority, an estimated 15 percent of the global population. But many of us—disabled and nondisabled alike—don’t know how to act, what to say, or how to be an ally to the disability community. Demystifying Disability is a friendly handbook on the important disability issues you need to know about

 

 

 

 

Disfigured : on fairy tales, disability, and making space by Amanda Leduc

Fairy tales shape how we see the world, so what happens when you identify more with the Beast than Beauty? If every disabled character is mocked and mistreated, how does the Beast ever imagine a happily-ever-after? Amanda Leduc looks at fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm to Disney, showing us how they influence our expectations and behaviour and linking the quest for disability rights to new kinds of stories that celebrate difference.

 

 

 

 

Disability aesthetics by Tobin Siebers

Disability Aesthetics is the first attempt to theorize the representation of disability in modern art and visual culture. It claims that the modern in art is perceived as disability, and that disability is evolving into an aesthetic value in itself. It argues that the essential arguments at the heart of the American culture wars in the late twentieth century involved the rejection of disability both by targeting certain artworks as “sick” and by characterizing these artworks as representative of a sick culture

 

 

 

 

Women, Disability, and Culture by Anna Siri

Women and girls with disabilities find themselves constantly having to deal with multiple, intersectional discrimination due to both their gender and their disability, as well as social conditioning. Indeed, the intersection made up of factors such as race, ethnic origin, social background, cultural substrate, age, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, gender, disability, status as refugee or migrant and others besides, has a multiplying effect that increases discrimination yet further. The book seeks to pay the right attention to the condition of women with disabilities, offering points for reflection, also on the different, often invisible, cultural and social undertones that continue today to feed into prejudicial stereotypes.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

New Database: ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Chicago Defender

MU Libraries is pleased to provide access to ProQuest Historical Newspapers Chicago Defender 1909-2010.

ProQuest Historical Newspapers Chicago Defender 1909-2010 adds coverage for 1976-2010 to our existing access to The Chicago Defender (1910-1975). Offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. The collection includes digital reproductions providing access to every page from every available issue.

If you have questions about the database or how to use it, contact your librarian at ask@missouri.libanswers.com.

 

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services Chat With the Librarians

Chat With the Librarians

Need research help? Working on a paper or project? You can ask a librarian for help using our chat service– almost 24 hours a day.

During the day you can chat with Mizzou librarians and library staff. At night, we offer access to a chat reference service called ChatStaff. They will be able to answer most research questions, except for some that are Mizzou-specific.

To access the chat service and see what hours chat reference is available, visit libraryanswers.missouri.edu.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Resources and Services National Hispanic Heritage Month Book Recommendations

National Hispanic Heritage Month Book Recommendations

September 15th – October 15th is National Hispanic Heritage Month. To celebrate at Mizzou Libraries, we’ve curated a list of books with the help of Mizzou’s Association of Latin@ American Students,  the Cambio Center, and some faculty from the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Thank you to these groups for taking the time to share their expertise and recommendations.

Below are a few we have available for check out. You can view the whole list of book recommendations here.

Have a purchase recommendation? Use our book recommendation form.

 

Bless me, Ultima, Rudolfo A. Anaya.

The winner of the Pen Center West Award for Fiction for his unforgettable novel Alburquerque, Anaya is perhaps best loved for his classic bestseller, Bless Me, Ultima… Antonio Marez is six years old when Ultima comes to stay with his family in New Mexico. She is a curandera, one who cures with herbs and magic. Under her wise wing, Tony will probe the family ties that bind and rend him, and he will discover himself in the magical secrets of the pagan past-a mythic legacy as palpable as the Catholicism of Latin America. And at each life turn there is Ultima, who delivered Tony into the world…and will nurture the birth of his soul.

 

Chronicle of a Death Foretold, Gabriel García Márquez 

A man returns to the town where a baffling murder took place 27 years earlier, determined to get to the bottom of the story. Just hours after marrying the beautiful Angela Vicario, everyone agrees, Bayardo San Roman returned his bride in disgrace to her parents. Her distraught family forced her to name her first lover; and her twin brothers announced their intention to murder Santiago Nasar for dishonoring their sister. Yet if everyone knew the murder was going to happen, why did no one intervene to stop it? The more that is learned, the less is understood, and as the story races to its inexplicable conclusion, an entire society–not just a pair of murderers—is put on trial.

 

Borderlands = La frontera, Gloria Anzaldúa 

Rooted in Gloria Anzaldúa’s experience as a Chicana, a lesbian, an activist, and a writer, the essays and poems in this volume challenge how we think about identity. Borderlands/La Frontera remaps our understanding of what a “border” is, presenting it not as a simple divide between here and there, us and them, but as a psychic, social, and cultural terrain that we inhabit, and that inhabits all of us. This 20th anniversary edition features a new introduction comprised of commentaries from writers, teachers, and activists on the legacy of Gloria Anzaldúa’s visionary work.

 

 

Farmworker’s daughter : growing up Mexican in America, Rose Castillo Guilbault

Guilbault was born in Sonora, Mexico in 1952, and in 1957 moved with her recently divorced mother to the U.S., where they settled in California’s Salinas Valley. In this flowing autobiography, she describes her experiences growing up as a Mexican immigrant in a farming community during the 1960s, and the challenges of maintaining a place in her immigrant family homelife while also acculturating to the public/American world around her

 

 

 

Open veins of Latin America ; five centuries of the pillage of a continent, Eduardo Galeano

Rather than chronology, geography, or political successions, Eduardo Galeano has organized the various facets of Latin American history according to the patterns of five centuries of exploitation. Thus he is concerned with gold and silver, cacao and cotton, rubber and coffee, fruit, hides and wool, petroleum, iron, nickel, manganese, copper, aluminum ore, nitrates, and tin. These are the veins which he traces through the body of the entire continent, up to the Rio Grande and throughout the Caribbean, and all the way to their open ends where they empty into the coffers of wealth in the United States and Europe.

Before a mirror : the city / Nancy Morejón ; edited and with an introduction by Juanamaría Cordones-Cook ; translated by David Frye

The African Cuban poet Nancy Morejón set out at a young age to explore the beauty and complexities of the life around and within her. Themes of social and political concern, loyalty, friendship and family, African identity, women’s experiences, and hope for Cuba’s future all found their way into her poems through bold metaphor and tender lyricism. Although Morejón does not sympathize as much with intellectualized feminism as with “street” feminism (the kind that erupts with force as it confronts daily life), her poems illuminate issues in women’s existence. Without intending to, she has revitalized contemporary Caribbean feminist literary discourse. One can find in her work the tensions between colonizer and colonized, dominator and dominated, and at the same time enjoy the sheer beauty of images depicting suffering, strength, and hope.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel Join Our Team: We Are Hiring Part-Time Safety Officers

Join Our Team: We Are Hiring Part-Time Safety Officers

Looking for a part-time position? We are hiring part-time Safety Officers to work at Ellis Library.

We are hiring for the following shifts for the fall semester. We are a 24-hour operation that operates all year long, including breaks (except the week between Christmas Day and New Year’s Day). Overnight shifts offer additional pay. The weekly hours range from 14 to 40 hours per week, with the potential for 40 hours a week during finals and breaks. Pay is $12.24/hr.

Shifts (5hr.-7hr. shifts)
Overnight: 12:30am to 7:30am (Priority)
Midday: 10:30am to 12:30pm
Daily: 12:30pm to 7:30pm
Saturdays: 9:45am to 5:30pm
Sundays: 12:45pm to 9:30pm and 9:30pm to 12:30am

To apply, visit hiremizzoutigers.com and search for job #5355365.