home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library What’s lurking in the J-Library?

What’s lurking in the J-Library?

The rumors are true!  There is an evil witch in the

J-Library that will smash students in the compact shelving!

We caught her on camera so watch the video!

Make sure you have sound on!

She’ll be hanging around till All Hallows Eve!

So be very careful when getting a book!

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library New to MU? Check out the FAQs about the Journalism Library

New to MU? Check out the FAQs about the Journalism Library

 

We hope everyone had a great break and for those of you who are new to MU welcome! We hope you have a great semester and that you use the MU Libraries.  Here is a quick guide to let you know important things about using the Journalism Library.    Get more information on our webpage under About Us.

 

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library, Resources and Services Resources for Journalism Graduate Students

Resources for Journalism Graduate Students

Starting your literature review?  Make sure to check out the Journalism Graduate Student Resources Libguide.

Whether you are an online student or here on campus.  Getting help is just an email away.  Contact Dorothy Carner carnerd@missouri.edu or Sue Schuermann schuermanns@missouri.edu to help you from start to finish.

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library, Uncategorized Draft: Mizzou Made: Fulbright Scholar Appreciates the Journalism Library Resources

Draft: Mizzou Made: Fulbright Scholar Appreciates the Journalism Library Resources

By Christina Mascarenas

Going to America was more a dream than reality to Indah Setiwati; a 30 hour plane ride dream. Indah was the deputy editor for the Jakarta Post in Jakarta, Indonesia when she decided to make a change and apply to attend graduate school.

In the beginning, Indah only applied to local scholarships even though studying aboard is a goal for many Indonesians. Indah had her family to think about. Not wanting Indah to limit her academic potential, a friend encouraged Indah to apply for the Fulbright Foreign Student Program, a program that enables graduate students, young professionals and artists from abroad to study and conduct research in the United States. If Indah was accepted she would finally have her ticket to the United States.

After weighing the pros and cons, Indah decided to go for it and applied to four scholarships including the Fulbright program. One day, she was taking the train to work when she received an email telling her she was accepted into the Fulbright program. It was “surreal,” she said. “The Fulbright Scholarship is the most prestigious scholarship on earth.”

Indah did research to find the best journalism school in the U.S. that would fit her interest. She chose Missouri because it’s the best journalism school and was affordable with her Fulbright Scholarship.

According to Indah, the Journalism Library at Mizzou has knowledgeable librarians. “Sue is really helpful and resourceful,” she stated referring to Sue Schuermann, Senior Library Specialist. Sue took the time to show Indah how to do precise searches and search for specific journals. “She is very helpful. She is a great resource, all you have to do it ask,” she said.

When Indah needed a book that the library didn’t have Sue was able to purchase the book for the library. When it arrived two days later Indah borrowed it for the semester. Indah was especially grateful for the “really cool” interlibrary loan program is “really cool,” Indah said. When she wanted to read a particular book, she was asked if she’d like to read the PDF or the book, she chose both. She thought it was great to get the book in three days.

“Books in Indonesia are precious. They are like a treasure,” she said. “Especially children’s books, it’s really hard to get English children’s books in Indonesia, they are expensive.” In addition to the Journalism Library, she has used Ellis Library, and the Daniel Boone Regional Library. She said American libraries are great, “They are like wow.” In Indonesia, according to Indah, “If you want to get an affordable children’s English book. You have to go to a second-hand store. The upper-class Jakartans donate or sell their books to the second-hand stores. You can only find books at certain places.”

“I’m happier here to see the library resources,” she said. “Another cool thing about the library is you have access to the New York Times and other publications and you don’t have to spend your money to subscribe to them since the library already subscribes to them.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cycle of Success

TAGS:

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

home Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library Getting To Know Us: The Journalism Library

Getting To Know Us: The Journalism Library

Dorothy Carner

Photo by Sam Ediger

Head, Journalism Library

How long have you been working for the Journalism Library?

I’ve worked at the journalism library for 12 years.

What is your favorite thing about working with the library/campus?

I’ve always worked in public service because of people and my need to be of assistance.  So, I enjoy working with the journalism library’s incredible staff, students, faculty, alumni, visiting scholars and all who rely on us to anticipate and help fulfill their research and teaching needs.  I get enormous pleasure from helping people.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

I wanted to be a doctor or more specifically, a pathologist or histologist.  I did get two biology degrees and taught anatomy and physiology at a college and nursing school and life science to junior high school students.

If you could live/travel anywhere in the world, where would it be?

I’ve been to several countries in Europe, but I would love to go to St. Petersburg, Russia.  Then, there are all of the Asian countries I need to visit.  So, the answer would probably be everywhere I haven’t been, then return to my favorites:  Vienna, Brussels, Innsbrook, Dublin…

 

 

Sue Schuerman

Senior Library Specialist

How long have you been working for the Journalism Library?

Photo by Sam Ediger

October will be the start of my 30th year. So many things have changed since I started working here.  I’ve been through two library moves and mold crisis/disaster.

What is your favorite activity/part about Columbia?

My favorite activity is working with plants, gardening, artful pruning and making art with concrete.  I like parks and trails around Columbia.  I like to go off trail and find a babbling brook and sit and listen to the sounds of the water.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

Truck driver ( So I could travel).

If you could live/travel anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Ireland – I want to retire there.

 

 

 

Charlotte Landreth

Library Information Specialist

How long have you been working for the Journalism Library?

Photo by J. Landreth

I started working with the MU libraries in October of 2016 and started working at the Journalism Library in June of 2018.

What is your favorite activity/part about Columbia?

The diversity! I love that Columbia and the surrounding communities has many festivals and activities and there always seems to be something to do.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

When I was younger I wanted to be a marine biologist, like those you see on shark week. 

If you could live/travel anywhere in the world, where would it be?

 I would love to travel or take an Alaskan cruise! I would also love to travel to England.

 

 

Danielle Wilson

Library Information Specialist

How long have you been working for the Journalism Library?

I was a student clerical assistant for 3 years before becoming the Evening Library Information Specialist where I have been for 2 and half years.

Photo by Sam Ediger

What is your favorite activity/part about Columbia?

I enjoy that Columbia always has something going on – my favorite activity would be the MU Football games! 

If you could live/travel anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Greece! Either the Athens or Patras area.

 

Charlotte Landreth

I am a Library Information Specialist at the Journalism Library.

How to avoid fines on equipment

We all know that everyone is busy and you don’t want to return equipment late and find out that you have fines for returning it late.

  • Look over our equipment page which tells you what we have to check out and what the check out times are.
  • Look over the equipment agreement form that you signed to be able to check out equipment.
  • You can always check your Merlin account online which tells you what you have checked out and when it’s due.
  • Create a calendar alert on your phone to tell you when items are due.
  • When checking out the equipment you can have the desk attendant show you on his/her checkout screen to see exactly when it’s due.
  • Watch your email for courtesy/overdue reminders and always check your spam folder.
  • If you can’t get back in time for when the equipment is due, call the library to get it extended 573-882-7502.  You can also contact Mary McFillen, Sue Schuermann, Danielle Wilson or Dorothy Carner.
  • If you do get fined for late equipment, remember that you will get charges for each piece of equipment you check out.  That can be several items on a camera kit.
  • Here are how fines work:
  • Fines for Reserve Books & Equipment

    Overdue Books on Reserve = $2/hr/book

    Overdue Equipment = $2/hr with $50 maximum

    Items not returned will need to be replaced with an exact replacement. Items not returned or replaced will result in a replacement cost and loss of MU Library checkout privileges and if replacement costs are high enough and you do not respond to emails about overdue or billed equipment, you can have a report filed on you at the Student Conduct Center. Always answer any emails about overdue equipment. Equipment must be returned or replaced. Fines can be negotiated on request.

    Returning Overdue Reserve/Equipment Items Will Not Remove Fines

TAGS:

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

JAM

What is Journalism Archive Management (JAM)?

Journalists and strategic communicators create large amounts of digital content. What happens to that content after its creation? Will it be discoverable next year? In five years?

Journal Archive Management (JAM) provides a set of best practices for journalism and strategic communication students to preserve and manage their content long after it has been created.

Learn more about JAM 

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

Diversity and Inclusion Resources

Schuermann, Sue

I am the Senior Library Specialist at the Journalism Library. I have over 28 years experience helping patrons with research, technology and outreach.

Next time you publish: claim your rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Why? According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights —including copyright — go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Yes. The SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. Learn more.

This open access message has been brought to you by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition.