home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander is this year’s One Read Program selection. The One Read Program is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Mizzou Libraries in order to facilitate conversations of diversity, inclusion, and social justice throughout the MU community. This year’s selection, The New Jim Crow, examines how old forms of discrimination have been legalized through the war on drugs and unequal enforcement of criminal laws.

An exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade features a timeline showing the increasing numbers of incarcerated Missourians over the past four decades. Key moments in criminal law, the privatization of prisons, Supreme Court decisions, and more are highlighted. The exhibit will be on display through October.

For more information, including upcoming events, visit One Read Program, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

Tigers on Incarceration
Several anonymous Tigers share their experiences of having friends and family members incarcerated.

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home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Now’s the Time to Get Your Course Reserves to Ellis Library

Now’s the Time to Get Your Course Reserves to Ellis Library

Beat the rush! Now’s the time to get your fall semester reserve items processed at Ellis Library, both physical items and e-reserves. Reserve requests are processed on a first-come, first-served basis, so take a look at our instructions for requesting print and e-reserves today. Problems or questions regarding reserves at Ellis Library? Call (573) 882-6038 or email umcellislibraryres@missouri.edu.

The Discover@MU Reading List is a new tool that can integrate library resources directly into your Canvas modules. This easy-to-use tool allows students to access articles directly inside your course site, and you can track usage. Our Discover@MU Reading List guide has step-by-step written and video instructions on how to use this tool. If you have questions or problems, use chat, call (573) 882-4581, or Ask a Librarian!

If Ellis Library isn’t your library, this course reserves contact directory has contact information for all other campus libraries.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander is this year’s One Read Program selection. The One Read Program is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Mizzou Libraries in order to facilitate conversations of diversity, inclusion, and social justice throughout the MU community. This year’s selection, The New Jim Crow, examines how old forms of discrimination have been legalized through the war on drugs and unequal enforcement of criminal laws.

An exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade features a timeline showing the increasing numbers of incarcerated Missourians over the past four decades. Key moments in criminal law, the privatization of prisons, Supreme Court decisions, and more are highlighted. The exhibit will be on display through October.

Tigers on Incarceration
Several anonymous Tigers share their experiences of having friends and family members incarcerated.

For more information on the book, events, additional resources, and information on the One Read Program, see Mizzou Law’s guide. Copies of the book are available for checkout in Ellis Library, the Journalism Library, and the Law Library.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Higher-Quality Poster Printer Now Available

Higher-Quality Poster Printer Now Available

A new higher-quality plotter printer is now available in the MU Mail & Print Center (Digiprint) in Ellis Library.

The new print costs are $3.75/sq ft for students and $4.75/sq ft for faculty and staff. (Cash, credit, or MOcode only. Printing costs cannot be charged to student accounts.) The Mizzou Tigers enjoy the lowest poster-printing costs in the SEC!

Assistance is available on site. Click on “Digiprint Center” on our hours page for current hours information. If you have any questions about this service, call Digiprint at 573-882-7262.

The old plotter printer will no longer be available after July 29.

 

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Guest Access Computers Update

Guest Access Computers Update

Six computers dedicated for guest access are now located in the James B. Nutter Family Information Commons alcove behind the Research Help and Information Desk in Ellis Library. All policies for guest accounts remain the same.

Guests can register for a free computer account at the Research Help and Information Desk. You need a current, valid government-issued photo ID. The account provides two hours of computer access per day.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services New Nonfiction: Theft By Finding (Diaries 1977-2002) by David Sedaris

New Nonfiction: Theft By Finding (Diaries 1977-2002) by David Sedaris

Looking for your next summer read? University Libraries are here for you.

David Sedaris is a well-known writer (well, well-known to most people: https://goo.gl/hcFmQY) whose humorous essays tend to focus on his own crazy life in addition to the crazy lives of his family and friends. However, his new work changes things up a bit.

While Sedaris has never been one to hide anything, his honesty reaches new heights in his latest book, “Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002).” The first of two volumes, this diary contains Sedaris’s observations on the world, which is different from most diaries, which contain the introspective thoughts and experiences of the writer. This creates a new kind of reading experience for fans of his previous works, offering a peephole into other people’s lives, and who doesn’t love that? Have you ever had a strange experience with a stranger, overheard a crazy conversation, or come across some hot gossip? While many of us might tell our friends and family, Sedaris told his journal, and now the world. Like many authors, he draws from life for his writing, and records the things around him. But unlike other writers, Sedaris records the little minutiae that some wouldn’t give a second thought. It’s an interesting look into the mind of a writer, and will inspire you to take an extra look/listen to things around you, and, possibly, start a journal of your own.

Check out this book at Ellis Library  or through MOBIUS.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Government Information Century-old Soil Survey Maps Also Reveal the Built Environment

Century-old Soil Survey Maps Also Reveal the Built Environment

Have you seen our latest display in the Bookmark Café? From a distance, these maps–neither paintings nor drawings–look like antique marbleized papers with amorphous shapes in a dreamy blending of lavenders, corals, blues, golds and pinks. But up close another scene is unveiled: villages as they appeared nearly a century ago. Schoolhouses on hilltops. Green plantations on the banks of the Rio Grande river, looking out into Mexico. Islands in lakes. Cemeteries and church buildings. Serpentine trails that wander through the wilderness, terminating at lone cabins. On the south wall, you can visit Las Vegas back when it only had a dozen streets each way, dots indicating buildings.

Sampson County, North Carolina

For nearly 100 years, a large collection of these soil survey maps have been folded up and tucked in the back of U.S. Department of Agriculture documents in Mizzou Libraries’ Government Information collection. Although the project’s purpose was to document soil types and alkalinity, the maps show much more than that.

These maps are generally too fragile to unfold without tearing, but with the help of award-winning preservation specialist Michaelle Dorsey, some maps from a 1923 volume were very carefully opened up and placed inside clear plastic envelopes, custom made in our on-site preservation shop. See the original maps on display now because they are for the most part not available online. However if you want to see one for a different place or year, you can use this guide to discover which areas were mapped on which dates, and we can help you view others in our print collection.

 

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Changes to the microfilm collections

Changes to the microfilm collections

The microfilm collections in room 406 are being moved to offsite storage in preparation for renovations that will turn the space into a classroom for Special Collections. All of the microfilms stored in this room are currently unavailable, and this change has been noted in the MERLIN catalog and on the microfilm finding aids. If you have questions or need access to these materials, please contact the Special Collections reference staff at SpecialCollections@missouri.edu.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Collaboration Builds Collections

Collaboration Builds Collections

The story of how Mizzou Libraries came to be one of the few libraries with a nearly complete set of Bildende Kunst, a visual arts journal from the former German Democratic Republic, began with an email but involved many hands. In Leipzig, Germany, on research leave, Assistant Professor Seth Howes contacted his subject librarian, Anne Barker, to ask about access to the journal after he returned to Mizzou. Without microfilm or online versions and with the closest complete set of the journal located in New York, Anne determined that access would be very difficult.

In the end, Seth considered not only “here’s why this is important to me” but also “here’s how important this is to me,” contributing some of his funds for research materials, matched by library funds, towards the purchase of additional issues.

Seth’s research focuses on the literature and experimental music and film of East Germany in its final fifteen years of existence, and Mizzou Libraries already had full print runs of the other two critical journals for his research, covering literature and music. Bildende Kunst can be translated as “Visual Art” or as “Educating Art or Art that Educates,” Seth explains. Because it reproduced art otherwise unavailable to East Germans, Bildende Kunst served as an educational magazine as well as a trade journal aimed at professionals.

Anne Barker

“One of the things that I think is very cool about having this in our collection now,” Seth says, “is that as a research institution with the teaching mission that comes with being a land-grant institution, we always need to think about how we can translate our work into teaching, and that is to a great extent what that journal did.” He plans on scheduling sessions with Special Collections in his courses so he can show students how these ideas were debated: “Can we have socialist art that looks like this? Is it not distracting or alienating to paint a worker in this way? Shouldn’t we just take recourse to 19th century realist painterly techniques?” Seth finds that students who are visual thinkers connect in a more meaningful way with a richly illustrated journal than ones that require greater language fluency to decode “communists arguing with each other.”

Anne says, “I was excited by this opportunity to enhance our research and teaching collections, but also because this adds to regional resources, making this important publication much more accessible to scholars in Missouri and surrounding states. I’m grateful for Seth’s initiative and willingness to invest his personal research funds to make this acquisition possible.”

Seth suggests that students and faculty think of “the library’s existing strengths as a jumping off point for our imagination of how to make strategic additions or strategic developments in new directions.” Despite budget challenges, he has found that “there is a will to grow the library’s resources for research and teaching, and everybody here is obviously working like mad to make resources available to students and faculty.”

Special Thanks

Many Mizzou Libraries staff members in addition to Anne played vital roles in getting the journal issues onto our shelves:

  • Corrie Hutchinson, Head of Acquisitions, identified and worked with the German vendor, determining costs and handling payments
  • Libby Myre, Senior Library Information Specialist, identified and worked with the German vendor, determining costs and handling payments, and input the journal’s information into the catalog
  • Michaelle Dorsey, Senior Library Information Specialist, with assistance from her preservation assistants, created containers to store the journal in its original format
  • Bette Stuart, Senior Library Information Specialist, input the journal’s information into the catalog
  • Kelli Hansen, Interim Head of Special Collections, provided space for the collection

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Summer Print Smart Allowance Now Active

Summer Print Smart Allowance Now Active

Summer Print Smart allowances are now active. If you are enrolled in summer semester, you can print. The summer allowance is $7 for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. If you are not enrolled, you can still print to the Circulation Desk printer in Ellis Library for $.05 per page.

Fall semester allowances will be active on August 6 for students enrolled in fall courses.

Check your Print Smart balance online any time.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.