MU Remembers

This year’s MU Remembers ceremony, commemorating students who have passed away since last April, will be held on April 6 at 2 p.m. in Stotler Lounge, Memorial Union. A book in honor of each student will be added to the University of Missouri Libraries’ collection. Commemorative bookplates are placed inside the books, and students are listed as honorees on the books’ library catalog records.

Family and friends are invited to visit Ellis Library to view the books. They will be on display following the ceremony near the Research and Information Desk.

The students’ names and the books selected in their memory are listed below.

John (Max) Critchfield (College of Business):

The Social Function of Accounts: Reforming Accountancy to Save Mankind by John Flower

Nicholas Foster (College of Engineering):

Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression–and the Unexpected Solutions by Johann Hari

Logan Gilbert (College of Arts & Sciences):

Weightlifting Rules: Poems and Photographs by Jean Barrett Holloway

Naira Kuzmich (College of Arts & Sciences):

Paper Lantern: Love Stories by Stuart Dybek

Carolin Scherf (College of Veterinary Medicine):

Plague, Print, and the Reformation: The German Reform of Healing 1473-1573 by Erik A. Heinrichs

Ryan Stoll (MU Informatics Institute):

The United States Tennis Association: Raising the Game by Warren F. Kimball

Andres Velasco Davila (College of Engineering):

Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930 by Benjamin René Jordan

Richard Ward (College of Arts & Sciences):

Counseling Children and Adolescents by Victoria E. Kress, Matthew J. Paylo, and Nicole A. Stargell

Ryan Wilt (College of Business):

A Wrestling Life: The Inspiring Life Stories of Dan Gable by Dan Gable

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Hours Spring Break Hours

Spring Break Hours

The MU Libraries have reduced hours during Spring Break. Find a complete listing at http://library.missouri.edu/hours/.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits On Display at Ellis Library: Opening Lines to Keep You Reading

On Display at Ellis Library: Opening Lines to Keep You Reading

Everyone knows you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, and everyone knows we all do it anyway. But it’s a lot easier not to do in academic libraries because many of our books don’t have illustrated book jackets.

One alternative is to judge a book by its opening line. Does that line make us feel curious, perplexed, sad, anxious? If it engages us, we keep reading.

Maybe one of these will encourage you to take the book home and find out what happens next.

We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones.

Beatrice Quimby‘s biggest problem was her little sister Ramona.

124 was spiteful.

Why is the measure of love loss?

Check out even more intriguing opening lines on our book display near the Research Help and Information Desk at Ellis Library.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Debbie Parker, instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, pinpoints a key challenge for international students: “Avoiding plagiarism is a daunting task for all students, but it is complicated by the fact that international students have different ideas about what is expected when using support in papers or presentations.”

A major assessment of the Intensive English Program’s students’ mastery of academic English is a formal speech using PowerPoint. This speech must incorporate research and requires students to produce a bibliography. Debbie took her colleague Mary Browning’s advice and contacted Cindy Cotner, the librarian for international students, to set up an instruction session about avoiding plagiarism.

Cindy immediately thought of LibWIS, a series of library workshops for international students. Two of Ellis Library’s Graduate Reference Assistants, Haley Gillilan and Victoria Knight, had recently taught a workshop on just this topic. Planning and teaching workshops is just part of the professional-level training and experience Haley and Victoria receive as GRAs while they complete their degrees in library science. They also provide research assistance in person at the Research Help and Information Desk as well as online through our chat service and assist librarians with other projects.

Haley Gillilan
Haley Gillilan

Cindy suggested that Haley and Victoria teach the session since they had already prepared a lesson on plagiarism specifically for international students. She says, “I am grateful that Debbie granted permission for our graduate students to teach in her classroom. Her students were engaged and asked good questions, and I think this activity was a learning experience for all!”

The instruction session went beyond a dry summary of “how to cite sources in academic classes without plagiarizing.” As part of Haley and Victoria’s presentation, they assessed students’ understanding using example citations. Debbie explains, “They asked the students to guess which ones were correct. If it wasn’t acceptable, the students needed to explain what was wrong with it.”

Learning about plagiarism and potential consequences from current students beholden to the same university standards of academic integrity helped reinforce the message in a unique way. Debbie says, “It also made it easier for me to reinforce the importance of citing their sources because I could refer back to the visit and remind them about the presentation that they heard.”

Victoria Knight
Victoria Knight

Victoria and Haley benefited from the opportunity to modify a workshop they’d taught before for use in an individual classroom. Victoria says, “Plagiarism is such a big topic and can differ so greatly from country to country. It was an amazing opportunity to get to take one of our library sessions out into the actual classroom. I think it was really beneficial, and it was a fun class to teach.” Haley sums it up well: “I hope that the class helped them with their academic success at Mizzou!”

Debbie wants all students, especially international students, to know that “the library offers so much more than just books.” A former student worker in Ellis Library, she says, “Librarians are an under-tapped resource which can save faculty, staff and students time and energy. The resources and the workshops can make the students’ learning experience much fuller.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services #TipTuesday: Looking for Your Next Great Read?

#TipTuesday: Looking for Your Next Great Read?

Even though Ellis Library is an academic library, we have an entire section of fiction just waiting to be browsed! No matter if you are looking for a work of classic fiction or something more contemporary, Ellis library has the books for you.

Fiction can be found in 2 East between the call numbers PR-PS.

If you are looking for a great classic book, check out these wonderful lists for inspiration!

Remember, if you need help finding a call number or a specific book, come to the Research Help and Information Desk or check out the guide How to Find a Book!

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Digital Media Lab Now Open

Digital Media Lab Now Open

Are you looking for a place to record an audio or video assignment for class?  Do you have a project that requires a 3D scanner?  If so, check out the new Digital Media Lab located in Ellis Library.  We want to hear your ideas!  Be it a podcast or voiceover, we may be able to help.

The Digital Media Lab provides a recording booth with various software; a film studio with a camera and green screen; and a 3D scanner. These resources are available to students for use by appointment. Visit https://libraryguides.missouri.edu/dmc/lab to learn more and to schedule your appointment today!

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services #TipTuesday: Quiet Study Areas

#TipTuesday: Quiet Study Areas

If silence and tranquility are what you need to succeed, this post is for you.

Did you know that Ellis library has designated quiet study areas on four out of five floors?

  • Maps of all the quiet study areas at Ellis library.

Are other students being disruptive in designated quiet areas?

Use our instant message service to request library staff ask students in these areas to be quiet.

If you’d rather call us, just be sure to leave the quiet area first!

 

 

home Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books, Support the Libraries Giving Day 2018: ULSAC Special Collections Outreach Contest

Giving Day 2018: ULSAC Special Collections Outreach Contest

This Mizzou Giving Day, the University Libraries Student Advisory Council is working hard on an outreach campaign to support the Special Collections Classroom Project.

Every org participating in the contest needs to email their point totals to ULSAC advisor, Grace Atkins atkinsge@missouri.edu by 10am on Thursday, March 15.

Points can be earned 4 ways

  1. Repost/Retweet from the @MizzouLibraries accounts – 1 POINT
  2. Tweet/Post original message about giving $10 to the Special Collections Classroom Project2 POINTS
  3. Send direct ask to someone to give $10 to Special Collections Classroom Project5 POINTS
  4. Participate in the Giving Day social media challenges10 POINTS

Outreach contest prizes include

  • If every org participates, ULSAC will have a permanent meeting space in Special Collections.
  • The org with the most points gets $400 donated in their name to the classroom project and a special thank you prize from Special Collections.
  • And, if MU Libraries is the unit with either the most donations or the most participation, Special Collections will win thousands of dollars in extra bonus funding!

ULSAC is made up of the following joint session student orgs: Association of Black Graduate and Professional Students (ABGPS), FourFront, Graduate Professional Council (GPC), lnterfraternity Council (lFC), Latino Graduate and Professional Network (LGPN), Library Ambassadors (LA), Legion of Black Collegians (LBC), Missouri lnternational Student Council (MISC), Missouri Student Association (MSA), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Panhellenic Association (PHA), and the Residence Hall Association (RHA).

TAGS:

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Friday Workshop, March 16

Friday Workshop, March 16

Copyright: Respecting the Rights of Others and Protecting Your Own
March 16, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
159 Ellis Library and online

When is it ok to download, rip, stream, copy, distribute, or perform art, music, or scholarship created by others? What happens if you do something that’s not OK? What about your own creations? Should you assign your rights to your publisher, or retain some for yourself? We can’t give you legal advice, but we can point you to guides that will help you thread your way through the U.S. Copyright landscape.

Anne Barker, Research & Instructional Services Librarian

Most workshops are offered simultaneously in two formats:
Face-to-face in Rm. 213 Ellis Library and live online.
To Register: tinyurl.com/MULibrariesworkshops
(click on gold calendar entries for face-to-face workshops and pink calendar entries for live online)

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

This guest post is written by Mary Browning, Instructor at the Center for English Language Learning.

In the fall of 2017, Cindy Cotner, the liaison between Ellis Library and MU international students, and I collaborated on two workshops designed to teach students in my classes about Zotero, an online tool that helps students research, collect, and cite their sources. As an instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, I am interested in discovering ways to enhance the academic experience of international students for whom English is a non-native language. Last fall, Cindy offered a Zotero workshop for 11 of my advanced students who were studying English full-time at the Intensive English Program and 25 international students who were taking my SSC 1150 College Success Seminar at MU.

Mary Browning, Na (Sabrina) Hu, Tianyu (Michael) Bai, and Kazuya Suzuki

During each workshop, Cindy patiently led the students through a progression of steps that allowed them to achieve sufficient mastery to be able to go back to their classrooms and seamlessly use Zotero in subsequent writing assignments. Because of the challenges that many international students face when studying in a non-native language, workshops offered by Ellis Library can greatly enhance their academic experience while at MU.

The Zotero workshop was a definite success: students in both of my classes were able to immediately apply the knowledge and skills they learned in Cindy’s workshop to their academic classes. They reported using Zotero to develop a personal library of relevant research sources, to access this information in real time by incorporating in-text citations while writing their essay drafts, and to create a reference page for their research essays in several strokes.

Mary Browning, Yudi (Gloria) Si, and Junjie (Betty) Qin

I’d advise any MU student, especially international students, to check out and then attend one or many of the workshops offered by Ellis Library to discover tips and techniques to use while researching and writing essays and completing other assignments. MU faculty who are interested in learning more about ways to collaborate with the library, should contact their subject librarian. Cindy is the contact for support of international students.

Mary Browning and Yiqing (Sybil) He

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.