home Cycle of Success, Staff news Grace Atkins Receives Missouri Library Association Outstanding New Librarian Award

Grace Atkins Receives Missouri Library Association Outstanding New Librarian Award

The Missouri Library Association’s Outstanding New Librarian Award recognizes an early-career librarian who has made a significant contribution to the improvement and advancement of library and information services in the state of Missouri. Grace Atkins, the Outreach & Open Education Librarian for the University of Missouri Libraries, has been chosen for this year.

Atkins received her Master of Science in Information Studies from the University of Texas at Austin School of Information in May 2015. At the iSchool, she specialized in Academic Libraries and Digital Libraries. She entered into the position of User Engagement Librarian at the University of Missouri in August 2015, and worked to improve the user experience in Ellis Library. Over the two-year period she has been at Mizzou, her role has evolved into outreach for all nine libraries on campus.

This past year, Atkins has focused on communication and marketing to reach library users. She worked with the marketing and social media teams to collaborate on creating a library newshub, which provides a way for library staff and users to share information about updates on services, collections, staff, workshops, and other events. As the liaison for student outreach, she established a University Libraries Student Advisory Council, which has greatly improved communication between library administration and student leaders. In Spring 2017, she partnered with MU’s Student Affairs office to pass a student fee through which a portion of the funding goes toward student-focused library services, such as keeping the main library open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week.

In her role as an Open Education librarian, Atkins is a campus coordinator for a UM system’s Affordable & Open Educational Resources (AOER) initiative, which is working to create a more equitable learning environment for students by significantly reducing the cost of textbooks and other course materials. As a new MOBIUS system leader for the Open Textbook Network, she will be providing training to librarians throughout the statewide consortia on how to use the Open Textbook Library. She has also recently been named a national fellow for the new SPARC Open Education Leadership program.

home Events and Exhibits Fourth Annual Cyberinfrastructure Day to Be Held on Oct. 4

Fourth Annual Cyberinfrastructure Day to Be Held on Oct. 4

Save the date! The Cyberinfrastructure Council will hold its fourth CI Day at MU at Memorial Union on Wednesday, October 4. This year’s theme is Leveraging Shared Resources for Innovation and Discovery.

CI Day fosters collaboration, networking, and collective problem-solving. Attendees will learn more about advanced computing technologies across a wide range of disciplines.

Registration is now open! Please register for the conference and make your FREE lunch selection. Lunch is generously being provided by Dell, Inc.

The keynote speakers are Irene Qualter of the National Science Foundation and Mark McIntosh the UM vice president for research and economic development. There are several other sessions featuring speakers from across the MU campus, including Anne Barker, research and instruction librarian for the University Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops LibWIS Wednesdays: Library Workshops for International Students

LibWIS Wednesdays: Library Workshops for International Students

What is LibWIS?

LibWIS means Library Workshops for International Students. These no-registration sessions are open to anyone, but international students are particularly encouraged to attend. Here are the dates for the remaining workshops this semester. Come to one or all of the workshops! You may bring your own laptop or use the desktops located in the classroom, Ellis Library, Room 4D11.

Introduction to Research
Wednesday, September 27
3:15-4:15 pm, Ellis Library Room 4D11

Learn how to find books in our library and how to request books from other libraries. Learn how to do basic research to find peer-reviewed journal articles.

Advanced Research
Wednesday, October 11
3:15-4:15 pm, Ellis Library Room 4D11

Discover which library resources are best for YOUR specific research. Learn time-saving tips for effective searching to find the research articles, reports, and other materials you need.

Plagiarism: What Is It & How to Avoid It
Wednesday, October 25
3:15-4:15 pm, Ellis Library Room 4D11

Your class syllabus has a statement about “academic dishonesty” and “academic integrity.” What does this mean at MU? Plagiarism is an important—but sometimes confusing—issue for domestic and international students alike. Many people unknowingly commit plagiarism when writing their papers. Join us to learn how to identify and avoid plagiarism in your academic writing. We will look at common errors in citing resources, paraphrasing, and summarizing research as well as how to correct those errors and prevent plagiarism in your academic work.

Zotero  (New in the LibWIS series this semester!)
Wednesday, November 8
3:15-4:15 pm, Ellis Library Room 4D11

Zotero is a free, open source computer program that provides space to store your citations and then formats them in hundreds of different citation styles as you write your paper, article, or dissertation. Join us as we discuss how to use Zotero in your writing.
We encourage you to bring your own laptop to this session and have Zotero downloaded on your laptop before coming. (Get assistance downloading Zotero at the Ellis Library Reference Desk.)

Topic to Be Announced
Wednesday, November 29
3:15-4:15 pm, Ellis Library Room 4D11

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Dr. Noah Manring and Engineering 2500

Cycle of Success: Dr. Noah Manring and Engineering 2500

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Dr. Noah D. Manring is the Glen A. Barton Professor of fluid power in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri. He previously served as chairman of the college’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and twice has served as associate dean of research. One of the courses he teaches is Engineering 2500: A History of Modern Engineering. It is through teaching this class that Dr. Manring came to know Tim Perry, one of our Special Collections Librarians. Tim arranged a lecture and demonstration on the printing press to teach the students about the history of the book, and the progression of book making since Gutenberg’s printing press in the 1450s.

Tim Perry, Special Collections

“Tim arranged an entire demonstration and working lecture for our students.  He answered questions, translated texts, and explained the significance of each item that was shown. There were three tables full of items to show and discuss. It was a very rich experience for my class – something I could not have provided for our students on my own.The library has a tremendous collection of printed material since Gutenberg’s day, including an original page from a Gutenberg Bible!”

We asked Dr. Manring what advice he had for those interested in using the library: “Make inquiries as to what resources are available, and use them!  I was referred to the Special Collections section of the library by Prof. Mark Smith in History, and I have since used this resource for my class three times.  Before Mark pointed me in this direction, I had no idea what was available and the wealth of information that could be drawn from our archives.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Save

Save

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Databases & Electronic Resources Database Trial: ProQuest Historical Newspapers: St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Database Trial: ProQuest Historical Newspapers: St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you are interested in regional news coverage, consider taking a look at the University of Missouri Libraries’ trial of ProQuest Historical Newspapers: St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Search the contents of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from 1874-2003, including news articles, photos, advertisements, classified ads, obituaries, cartoons, and more. The easily searchable interface will lead you to first-hand accounts from the time, reporting on politics and other events, and tales of local society.

Trial ends October 15, 2017. Take a look and let us know what you think.

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Linda Hillemann, Clinical Instructor/Online Education and Field Support Specialist in the School of Social Work, works off campus and supports online students in southern Missouri. She was updating a lecture on the history of social work on Canvas when she realized she didn’t have a credit for a diagram by Mary Richmond, one of the founders of social work. Linda describes her research process: “I have digital copies of some of her documents and was pretty sure which one it came from, but I was wrong! Not only was it not from her book Social Diagnosis, it wasn’t in any of the other documents I have. So I started Googling. There are only so many websites devoted to social work history so I was pretty confident I could find it back, but it was much harder than I expected.”

After searching all the sites she knew with all the search terms she could think of to no avail, she contacted her subject librarian, Kimberly Moeller, for help. Kimberly was able to reverse engineer a search, and Linda says, “A mere two hours later I had the reference and a link to the document.”

Linda Hillemann

Kimberly found the original pencil drawing in conference proceedings over a century old. She explains, “The diagram was first presented and published at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in 1901, which didn’t originally come up in the search I ran. However, Richmond’s colleagues were apparently so impressed with her work that the diagram was mentioned in numerous iterations of this same conference, referring back to the proceedings from 1901.” Kimberly provided Linda with a link to the scanned version of the proceedings available through the digital library Hathi Trust, which meant she had immediate access.

Linda had never seen the conference proceedings before and found it be a fascinating historical document. More importantly, it provided the reference she needed to include vital information in her course. She explains that the diagram “demonstrates a clear line of a basic social work concept from our beginnings to current practice. That was something I wanted to demonstrate in this lecture: our connection today to our remarkable history, and thanks to Kim I was able to do that.”

Kimberly Moeller

Linda and her online students rely on Kimberly and other librarians to help them locate and obtain materials since they are not able to visit the library in person. When it comes to using the library or needing research assistance, Linda advises, “If you need something, ask, even if it seems like a pretty wild-eyed request. I think these librarians can pull rabbits out of a hat.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library MU Libraries Participates in Women’s and Children’s Hospital Reverse Trick-or-Treat

MU Libraries Participates in Women’s and Children’s Hospital Reverse Trick-or-Treat

For the past few years, the Women's and Children's Hospital has organized reverse trick-or-treating. MU employees are invited to hand out treats to pediatric patients, siblings, and children of adult patients. This year, one of our medical librarians, Taira Meadowcroft, asked for volunteers to go with her this Halloween to participate.

This fantastic group put together halloween bags filled with stickers, pencils, instruments, play-doh, and many other goodies. In all their Halloween glory, they loaded up several boxes, and headed to the hospital. Once there, they were greeted by superheros, princesses, football players, and tinkerbells, all waiting to trick-or-treat. By the end, there was no goodie bags left!

Thanks to all who volunteered to be apart of the 200 MU and MU health staff who handed out treats. Be sure to take a peek at the MU Health instagram and story https://www.instagram.com/muhealth/

reverse-trick-or-treat-instagram

 

Our volunteers included: Grace Atkins, Cindi Cotner- Halloween , Stara Herron- Jack Skellington , Taira Meadowcroft- Netlflix, Kimberly Moeller- Ninja, Paula Roper, Caryn Scoville, Deb Ward- Wizard , Rhonda Whithaus

 

Follow Mizzou.Libraries on instagram!

happy-halloween

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Next time you publish: claim your rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Why? According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights —including copyright — go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Yes. The SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. Learn more.

This open access message has been brought to you by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 

home Special Collections and Archives, Workshops Primary Source Workshop: Great Content for your Classroom

Primary Source Workshop: Great Content for your Classroom

Are you excited about using primary sources with your students? Do you want to know how the State Historical Society of Missouri and MU Special Collections can contribute sources for your classroom? Are you helping students find resources for National History Day projects? This free educator workshop is for you!

Join the State Historical Society of Missouri in Ellis Library on the University of Missouri campus to explore:

· SHSMO collections in person and online, with a focus on the 2017 National History Day theme: Taking a Stand in History

· MU Special Collections

· SHSMO’s art gallery with curator Dr. Joan Stack

· Strategies for using primary sources effectively to make National History Day projects stand out

Please RSVP at shsmo.org/events. Attendees will be offered a free parking pass. In order to guarantee delivery, please register prior to November 4.

TAGS:

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is head of the Special Collections and Rare Books department.

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Resources and Services Trial Available for Oxford Scholarly Editions Online

Trial Available for Oxford Scholarly Editions Online

Including the complete works of Jane Austen and all of the plays of Shakespeare, Oxford Scholarly Editions (OSEO) also features 880 Oxford critical editions. OSEO coverage includes annotated texts originally written from 1485 to 1901, as well as some classic Greek authors. One of the nice aspects of this resource is how the annotations are displayed. Annotations are located in an adjustable panel to the right of the text. By clicking the annotation or the footnote, the interface scrolls automatically to the appropriate position. Additionally, this database is easily browsed by author, work, or edition, and includes a list of selected works. Check it out before our trial ends on November 17, 2016.

More info

Oxford Scholarly Editions Online