home Workshops Fridays @ the Library: Public Access Policies (or…Zen and the Art of Compliance), Oct. 28

Fridays @ the Library: Public Access Policies (or…Zen and the Art of Compliance), Oct. 28

Need to make your research publically available? This session will provide an overview on complying with Public Access Policies from funding agencies such as NIH and NSF. Topics will also include a brief overview of Open Access journals and how they relate to agency policies

Register here: https://libraryguides.missouri.edu/fridaysworkshops

  • Friday, Oct 28
  • 1-2pm
  • in-person in Ellis 213 or online

This Fridays @ the Library workshop kicks off our Open Access Week activities! Click here for more information on Open Access Week 2016.

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home Events and Exhibits, Resources and Services, Workshops Open Access Week Oct. 21-28, 2016

Open Access Week Oct. 21-28, 2016

MU Libraries are celebrating Open Access Week 2016 from October 21-28.

How can you participate in Open Access Week 2016?

  1. Learn more about Open Access: What is Open Access (OA) and why does it matter?
    Check out our OA guide for more information: https://libraryguides.missouri.edu/openaccess
     
  2. Attend an Open Access workshop: We have 2 workshops for OA week.

     

    • Share Alike: Creative Commons – October 21 @ 1-2pm in Ellis 213 or online
      If you’re looking for content (images, videos, music, etc.) that you can freely and legally use for your coursework, search through Creative Commons. Or, if you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you can publish it under a CC-license. Whether you’re a user or creator, this workshop will answer all of your questions about Creative Commons materials and licenses.
      Register to attend in-person or online
    • Public Access Policies (or…Zen and the Art of Compliance) – October 28 @ 1-2pm in Ellis 213 or online
      Need to make your research publically available? This session will provide an overview on complying with Public Access Policies from funding agencies such as NIH and NSF. Topics will also include a brief overview of Open Access journals and how they relate to agency policies.
      Register to attend in-person or online
       
  3. Read and share the latest news on Open Access:
    To raise awareness about OA, we'll be posting and retweeting information about Open Access all week long. Check out our

     

To spread the word about Open Access Week, feel free to share this OA Week blogpost, OA Week flyer, or OA Week poster!

Special thank you to our sponsors for supporting our Open Access Week events and helping to raise awareness about the importance of Open Access:

home Ellis Library, Government Information, Resources and Services Register to Vote at the Ellis Library Reference Desk

Register to Vote at the Ellis Library Reference Desk

The Ellis Library Reference Desk is now a voter registration place. 

To vote in the November presidential elections, Missouri voters must be registered by Wednesday, Oct 12th!

We encourage all students, staff and community members to register! Check out our guide all about how to register! https://libraryguides.missouri.edu/register-to-vote

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Families Welcome at Ellis Library Open House After the Homecoming Parade

Families Welcome at Ellis Library Open House After the Homecoming Parade

Visit Ellis Library immediately after the Homecoming Parade on Saturday, Oct. 22 for refreshments, tours and family activities. The first 100 kids will receive a free mini pumpkin. This event is free and open to the public.

home Cycle of Success, Journalism Library 14 graduate students receive scholarships to attend digital news preservation event at UCLA

14 graduate students receive scholarships to attend digital news preservation event at UCLA

Fourteen graduate students from academic institutions across the U.S. have been selected to receive funding assistance to attend a conference next month where they will take active steps toward preserving digital news.

Each student has received a travel scholarship to help cover expenses to attend the Dodging the Memory Hole: Saving Online News forum Oct. 13 and 14 at UCLA. Students will work side by side with journalists, technologists, librarians and other stakeholders to craft a national agenda for preserving born-digital journalism — content created on a computer or digital sensor.

The forum is an initiative of the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute’s Journalism Digital News Archive with funding from RJI and an Institute of Museum and Library Services Award. Additional support is being provided by UCLA Library, University of Missouri Libraries and the Educopia Institute.

It’s important to make future journalists, archivists and technologists part of the solution now, says Edward McCain, digital curator of journalism at RJI and University of Missouri Libraries.

“It is critical we begin building awareness of the need to preserve born-digital news content today so that future generations will not suffer the looming ‘memory hole’ of lost journalistic reportage,” says McCain. “I’m delighted to have such talented individuals joining us as we work together to save online news.”

Attendees will hear from speakers from organizations including The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and the Library of Congress. Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent Peter Arnett will be a special guest speaker.

The scholarships are being funded by a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant from IMLS. The funding assistance was available to graduate students in the U.S. studying library/information science, journalism, computer science and other related fields.

As part of being selected to receive a scholarship, each student has been asked to propose and complete a project that supports one of the conference goals. They will also pitch their project ideas to the assembly during the forum.

Meet the scholarship recipients

Chris AllmanChris Allman of Charlotte, North Carolina, studies library and information science at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He wants to learn more about how the local news startup Charlotte Agenda is preserving its born-digital news content, and develop additional guidelines for how Charlotte Agenda staff can improve those efforts.

John BerlinJohn Berlin of Suffolk, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, where he works for the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group. His project goal is to improve the Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL) software system by adding a feature to enable users to specify criteria to track news or other content from media platforms such as Twitter. Once identified, this content could then be archived automatically.

Terry BrittTerry Britt of Sweetwater, Tennessee, is a doctoral candidate studying journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. He will write a research paper on the significance of efforts to assure the lifespan and accessibility of local online news content.

Itza CarbajalItza Carbajal of New Orleans, Louisiana, is an information studies scholar at the University of Texas in Austin. She plans to conduct a research project that lists tools such as ArchiveReady.com that measure the ability for a website to be archived properly. She then plans to assess the web archiving readiness of a variety of online news providers.

Jiwon ChoiJiwon Choi of Osan, South Korea, is studying convergence journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She plans to meet with international students from the University of Missouri to explore how to protect online media content and develop  possible solutions.   

Alison GuilloryAlison Guillory of Belmont, Massachusetts, is a library and information science scholar at Wayne State University in Detroit. She wants to determine which technologies have successfully protected content from the memory hole and which haven’t by studying how news saved in a digital format have fared over a 20-year period. She plans to document what she learns in a timeline. 

Matt HellmanMatt Hellman of Austin, Texas, is a journalism student at the University of Missouri in Columbia. His project involves a case study of how the Columbia Missourian photography staff is using open source software to provide access to and create a cloud-based long-term archive for digital content.

Shawn JonesShawn Jones of Virginia Beach, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project will explore the potential relationship between social media sharing of news articles and how quickly those articles are identified by web crawlers as candidates for archiving.

Mat KellyMat Kelly of LaBelle, Florida, is a doctoral candidate studying computer science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project addresses the need to provide individuals with ways to collect, archive and access news content they perceive as important. Kelly’s work is intended to supplement the large-scale collection work being done by institutions such as the Internet Archive and Library of Congress.

Eva ReaverEva Revear of Puyallup, Washington, studies journalism at New York University in New York. Her goal is to find a way to preserve data-driven news applications such as ProPublica’s Dollars for Docs. She is currently conducting a survey to collect data about news apps so she can devise ways to organize news app archiving systems. Her findings will be published as an academic paper.

Hanna SoltysHanna Soltys of St. Louis studies library and information science at Simmons College in Boston. Her project examines questions surrounding how to create more complete preservation methods that accommodate the complexity of digital news platforms. She will also investigate why current archival practices are struggling to preserve online news content.

Carolina VargasCarolina Vargas of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She wants to reach journalism students with messages that increase awareness of the problem of born-digital content loss and provide options for solving this problem.

Tamar WilnerTamar Wilner of Dallas studies journalism through the University of Missouri’s online journalism master’s program. She seeks to address problems associated with inaccurate and outdated news content by exploring technology that supports online correction methods.

Elizabeth ZirkElizabeth Zirk, of Palatine, Illinois, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She will help author and edit a white paper about the forum outcomes. This will include gathering details about the proposed national agenda for preserving born-digital news, projects proposed by working groups and reports summarizing panels and presentations from the event.

Adobe Software Available on Library Computers

Library Technology Services has an array of Adobe Software available for students, faculty and staff of the University of Missouri. The software includes 

  • Adobe Acrobat Pro
  • After Effects
  • Audition
  • Bridge
  • Dreamweaver
  • Fireworks
  • Flash
  • Illustrator
  • InCopy
  • InDesign
  • Lightroom
  • Muse
  • Photoshop
  • Prelude
  • Premiere Pro

Users can access the software on the Macs in the Information Commons at Ellis, the Health Sciences Library 1st floor computers, the Journalism Lab and the Journalism Macbook Pro laptops. However, the software is not included within Software Anywhere.

This software will be useful for digital storytelling students, journalism students and anyone interested in using more creative software for a variety of projects.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections and Archives Life and Letters in the Ancient Mediterranean

Life and Letters in the Ancient Mediterranean

An intriguing event is coming up in Ellis Library! It's called "Life and Letters in the Ancient Mediterranean" and is being presented by the departments of Classical Studies, Art History and Archaeology, the Museum of Art and Archaeology, Special Collections, the Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection, and Gamal Castile.  See actual artifacts of everyday life in Ancient Greece, the first books by Classical poets printed on this side of the Atlantic, a 3000 year old fragment of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, authentic reproductions of Ancient Greek hoplite weapons and armor along with a demonstration of Ancient Greek warfare tactics.

Please join us for a multi-department celebration of Ancient Mediterranean Life and Letters 5 p.m. Monday, October 10 at room 114A Ellis Library. Special Collections Librarian Tim Perry will introduce the range of materials relating to the ancient Mediterranean that are housed in Ellis Library's Special Collections, from a 3,000 year old fragment of The Book of the Dead to an translation of Cicero printed by Benjamin Franklin. Benton Kidd, Curator of Ancient Art, will explain the artifacts of daily life.  The event will be a riveting and valuable source of information. Any and all are welcome. We hope to see everyone in Ellis Library room 114A on October 10, 2016.gallery

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home Events and Exhibits, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library A Personal Perspective on Race, Opportunity and the US Health System LIVE STREAM

A Personal Perspective on Race, Opportunity and the US Health System LIVE STREAM

You're Invited: Louis W. Sullivan, MD, US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–1993), will talk about his life story, and racial disparities and medical care on Tuesday, October 4, 2:00-3:00 pm (eastern time). Dr. Sullivan’s presentation will be live-streamed globally. It will also open be to the public at NIH, Building 10, in the Lipsett Auditorium.

A meet and greet with Dr. Sullivan, sponsored by the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences, will follow the presentation.

Dr. Sullivan will share his life story, growing up in rural Georgia during the period of legally-sanctioned and enforced racial segregation, and the impact it had on him, his family, and on the black community. He was inspired to become a physician when, at age 5, he met the only black physician in Southwest Georgia.

After becoming a hematologist and professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, he went on to found the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, followed by an appointment as US Secretary of Health and Human Services in the administration of George H.W. Bush.

Dr. Sullivan developed initiatives to increase racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in the US Department of Health and Human Services and in the nation’s health workforce.

Throughout his career, Sullivan has worked to improve the effectiveness of the US health system and the diversity of its workforce. The elimination of disparities in health care, which exist between whites and the nation’s underserved minorities, is an ongoing priority of Dr. Sullivan. He’ll discuss progress to date and remaining challenges.

History of Medicine Lecture Series
Dr. Sullivan’s presentation is part of NLM’s History of Medicine Lectures for 2016. The lecture series, sponsored by the NLM History of Medicine Division, promotes awareness and use of NLM and other historical collections for research, education, and public service in biomedicine, the social sciences, and the humanities. The series also supports the commitment of the NLM to recognizing and celebrating diversity.

All lectures are free and open to the public. They are also live-streamed globally, and subsequently archived, by NIH VideoCasting.

 

Database Spotlight: Artstor

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. While adding one to your presentation or paper won’t actually add a thousand words to your word count, they can help put your project over the top.

Artstor is a great resource featuring a growing collection of more than 2 million high-quality images for education and research uses. The digital library allows you to search for images in art, architecture, the humanities, and social sciences and use them in your assignments for class. Artstor contains images from all parts of the world and of all different objects including a collection of old master drawings, African masks, medieval manuscripts, images of grottoes in the Gobi Desert, and archives of Islamic textiles.

The image viewer allows you to manipulate the images in a variety of ways including enlarging, panning, and rotating. Want to use an image in a project or paper? You can print them out with their descriptions or download and save them for later. You can even share images with classmates.

The free account that you can create offers even more features to help you maximize your Artstor experience. After you make your account, you can set viewing preferences, create folders to save images in, save citations, and even save your searches.

Speaking of searching, there are several ways you can find the images you need. There is a simple keyword search but when that won’t cut it, there is a robust advanced search that allows you to search by date or date range, geography, classification, or collection. This can really help you.

In addition to Artstor’s large digital collection, they also give us access to the Shared Shelf Commons. Shared Shelf is a place where institutions like Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and many art museums can upload and share their own collections.

Tips and Tricks:

  • Use * for truncation and _ for wildcards when searching.
  • Spelling matters on searches, so double check on how to spell that artist’s tough name.
  • Be sure to check out the copyright rules when using Artstor, their images are not to be put on the open web or used commercially. For a full list of what is permitted, please visit their page at http://www.artstor.org/content/permitted-prohibited-uses. If you have any questions, feel free to contact a librarian who will be able to help you out.
home Cycle of Success, Events and Exhibits, Hours ULSAC Meeting: Library Hours

ULSAC Meeting: Library Hours

The University Libraries Student Advisory Council will be meeting Tuesday, October 4th @ 5pm in Ellis Library meeting room 114A.

This meeting is being held to discuss the recent student demand for increased library hours and funding. Due to the impact of this major issue and the nascent nature of this council, executive or senior leaders of your organizations are encouraged to attend in addition to appointed ULSAC representatives.

Plans for the ULSAC governance document, chair elections, and regular meeting schedule will also be discussed. If you cannot attend, assign a proxy so that your organization’s needs are represented and information from the meeting can be communicated back to your organization.

Questions? Contact user engagement librarian Grace Atkins at atkinsge@missouri.edu

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  • FourFront
  • Graduate Professional Council (GPC)
  • lnterfraternity Council (lFC)
  • Library Ambassadors (LA)
  • Legion of Black Collegians (LBC)
  • Missouri lnternational Student Council (MISC)
  • Missouri Student Association (MSA)
  • National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
  • Panhellenic Association (PHA)
  • Residence Hall Association (RHA)