Increase your Research Impact through LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great free tool, that you might already use. Since LinkedIn targets professionals, it is an ideal tool to interact with fellow researchers. 

 

Step 1: Create your profile

Write a strong headline that showcases your expert areas.

Add a picture.

Write a compelling summary of the work you’ve done, and why it matters. Here is an example from Monica F. Cox.

Finally, make yourself more “googleable” by ensuring your profile is public. 

Step 2: Connect with other academics

Add your email address and LinkedIn will suggest connections based on people you already know.

You can message and communicate with connections to build meaningful relationships. 

Step 3: Highlight your work

Add work that you’re particularly proud of to LinkedIn (Profile > Add Profile Section > Accomplishments).

Share new funding, publications, or thoughts on new research. 

Likely, the research audience you want to target already utilizes LinkedIn. So using LinkedIn to increase the impact and visibility of your research is quick and effective. 

Need help setting one up? Email us at asklibrary@health.missouri.edu

Increase Research Impact Through Video Abstracts

Video abstracts are a great way to increase your research impact. A video abstract allows you to explain research in your own words, encourage people to engage in your research, and increase your research visibility. Finally, video abstracts allow you to reach a wider demographic – allowing you to reach your community in a wider scale.

Tips for creating a video abstract:

  1. Keep it short, ideally 2-3 minutes.
  2. Clearly define the problem, your research, and the broader impact.
  3. Be accessible – use clear language and be succinct. Video abstracts are a great way to engage a larger audience.
  4. Include images – pictures, graphs, charts or tables.
  5. End with a call to action – encourage people to read your article!

Below are a few examples of video abstracts that successfully tell a story. 

You can checkout video, audio and computer equipment from the libraries. Post your video on YouTube or Vimeo and share it on MOspace.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Increase your Research Impact with Twitter

Increase your Research Impact with Twitter

One way to improve your research impact is to utilize free social media tools like Twitter, a microblogging service that makes it easy to engage with researchers and funders alike. It helps raise your professional profile and can help increase your Almetrics score.

Why should you utilize Twitter? 

  1. You can quickly follow emerging news and trends in your field 
  2. Connect and converse with people, inside and outside of your field, regarding your research 
  3. Increase your research visibility 
  4. Find out about conferences, calls for abstracts, and funding opportunities

How to make Twitter work for you?

  1. Add a short bio and #hashtag your research keywords. 
  2. Follow people, journals, and funders in your field – you can search for them by entering terms in the search box. Twitter will curate a specific feed on your homepage of relevant information, called “tweets”.
  3. Share! Make tweets about recent articles in your field – written by you or others. Your opinion on developments in your field or on others’ research or news and blog posts relevant to your research. Here are some tips to make your tweets gain traction:
    1. Use #hashtags to ensure you’re reaching the right community and @tag anyone relevant to the tweet. 
    2. Pictures and infographics are engaging and increase the likelihood of engagement. 
    3. Encourage discussion by asking thoughtful questions or thought-provoking commentary. 
    4. Remember to be professional.

Sign up for Twitter here and remember to follow @MizzouLibraries

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Increase your Research Impact through ORCiD

Increase your Research Impact through ORCiD

Your research is important and we want to help you ensure it is making an impact. ORCiD is a great way to start increasing your research impact with minimal effort.

What is ORCiD?

An ORCiD ID is a permanent unique identifier for researchers. Using your ORCID iD is more accurate and secure than a name: many people can have the same name but each ORCID iD is unique. They protect your unique scholarly identity and help you keep your publication record up-to-date with very little effort.

Why should you get an ORCiD ID?

ORCiD ID’s are permanent and will follow you throughout your entire career.

ORCiD is increasingly used by individuals (e.g. as a signature in emails) and systems (e.g. in Scopus, PubMed), enabling recognition and discoverability.

ORCiD automatically updates your profile from other systems – saving you time.

ORCiD is unique to you.

How to get an ORCID ID?

Here is a detailed explanation of how to get your ORCID started. Reach out to the library for help!

SPI-Hub: New Journal Evaluation Tool

The Scholarly Publishing Information Hub is a new journal evaluation tool created with biomedical scientists in mind. This tool quickly evaluates journals and allows users to compare journals based on impact metrics, editorial policies, and general journal information. Users can search this tool with keywords, journal names, or by author. SPI-Hub is a great resource when preparing to publish a manuscript. For more information on publishing your research check out our library guide.

TAGS:

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is a health sciences librarian at the University of Missouri. Rachel's work focuses on supporting the research mission of the University.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Use MOspace to Measure the Worldwide Impact of Your Research

Are you presenting at Health Sciences Research Day? Add your poster to MOspace to help boost your resume.

MOspace is the freely available online repository for scholarship and other works by University of Missouri faculty, students, and staff.

You retain copyright, and we provide access.

Once items are submitted, the platform can provide statistics like number of downloads, and from which countries.

Currently, all Health Sciences Research Day posters in MOspace have a total of 14,651 downloads from over 100 countries worldwide.

Interested in seeing the worldwide impact of your research? Submit your poster using our online form today.

You can further your impact by signing up for an ORCID ID at ORCID.org.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: May 17-18

Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: May 17-18

From May 17th-18th, the first floor will be restricted to third year medical students for testing between the hours of 7:30 PM to 5:00 PM. Wish our M3’s luck!

Remember if you need to print, use the Health Sciences Library Copy Room Printers located on the second floor of the library.

TAGS:

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is a health sciences librarian at the University of Missouri. Rachel's work focuses on supporting the research mission of the University.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: May 7th-11th

Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: May 7th-11th

From May 7th-11th, the first floor will be restricted to medical students for testing between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Wish our medical students luck!

Remember if you need to print, use the Health Sciences Library Copy Room Printers located on the second floor of the library.

TAGS:

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is a health sciences librarian at the University of Missouri. Rachel's work focuses on supporting the research mission of the University.

Health Sciences Library New Books

Check out this month’s new books at the Health Sciences Library. You can use the drop down menu to see previous month’s additions.

Have a purchase recommendation? You can request a book for your teaching or research using this form.

home Hours, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Spring Break Hours: J Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library

Spring Break Hours: J Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library

The Health Sciences Library will be open over Spring Break.

Sunday, March 25: 2:00PM-11:00PM

Monday, March 26- Thursday, March 29: 7:00AM-11:00PM

Friday, March 30: 7:00AM-6:00PM

Saturday, March 31: 10:00AM-7:00PM

Sunday, April 1: 5:00PM-12:00AM

University Libraries Hours

Have a safe and fun Spring Break!

 

 

TAGS:

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is a health sciences librarian at the University of Missouri. Rachel's work focuses on supporting the research mission of the University.