home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Cycle of Success: English 1000 Pilot Program Results in Increased Collaboration

Cycle of Success: English 1000 Pilot Program Results in Increased Collaboration

Last year, Cindy Cotner served as the Interim Head of Instructional Services at Ellis Library and oversaw a pilot program where new teaching assistants in the English department were each matched to an individual librarian for library instruction and research assistance for their sections of English 1000, the first-year writing course required of Mizzou students. Due to the success of the program, it has been expanded this year, with every English 1000 instructor matched to a librarian for their courses.

In April, Cindy and Anne Barker presented “Bringing the Library into the Classroom: Rethinking Library Resources” with Deanna Benjamin and Bailey Boyd, the English 1000 instructors they worked with, at the MU Composition Program’s Celebration of Writing and Teaching.

Collaboration with librarians is nothing new for Deanna Benjamin, a PhD candidate who, in addition to teaching a variety of courses here at Mizzou, has taught in St. Louis since 2008. Cindy co-taught two sessions regarding the research process with Deanna in her classroom. During the first class session, the class worked on “an exercise that connected Cindy’s introduction to the library and research with the semester research project.” They opened the second class session with a Q&A and then “visited with students individually while they all conducted research online.” Deanna says, “Our collaboration in class helped the students ask a variety of research questions that at least one of us was able to answer.”

When the students presented their research later in the semester, Cindy reinforced the library’s commitment to undergraduate research by attending the presentations.

During her master’s program here at Mizzou, Bailey Boyd first taught English 1000 and began collaborating with the library for research instruction. Now a first-year PhD student in creative nonfiction writing, her personal research interests include “uncovering new bits of information that have been hidden away, such as archival research and new sides to a well-known story.”

Anne Barker

Last year, Bailey met with Anne early in the fall semester to discuss how the library could help her students with their projects. Bailey requires her to students to “select a Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph, analyze that photograph, and then use research to fit that photograph within its original historical and cultural moment.” In conjunction with that assignment, Anne “put together an amazing course guide where the students could explore different research on eras, all collected in one place!” For this semester’s library visit for the same assignment, Anne went a step further. Bailey says she “had pulled out old Time magazine archives and Harper’s Bazaar archives so that students could see–in real, tangible form–what people in different decades would be seeing. Students were able to surround themselves and immerse themselves in that world for a short while.”

Bailey saw the effect of library instruction very clearly in her students’ final essays for this project. She says, “The research I saw in their papers was quite extraordinary–some students relayed background stories of famous photos that had changed their minds about the photographs. In my opinion, this research led to richer and more in-depth analysis of their photographs–every essay was interesting and thought-provoking.”

When Bailey wanted to assign her students the Ellis Library scavenger hunt, which can be completed by students on their cell phones, she worked with Anne to customize call numbers to the food research and cookbook area “so that they were led to the stacks that had the information they would need further in the semester.”

Inspired by this collaboration, Bailey has incorporated some changes into her curriculum. She says, “I’ve already increased our class library visits from one visit to three and now require my students to consult with a librarian at least once on their own time throughout the semester. These past semesters of library collaboration have really shown me how important early incorporation of the library truly is.”

Anne says that “the collaboration has allowed us to be more proactive and engaged with the TAs, so that the library portions dovetail more with their objectives for the class. We’ve also been able to experiment more with providing handouts, online lessons, guides, and brief videos that can be used outside of the classroom time, so that the time we have together with students can be a bit more interactive.” Because the level of collaboration between librarians and English 1000 instructors is still evolving, she finds being able to work with the same teaching assistants for multiple semesters helpful.

Deanna and Bailey shared some advice on how to take advantage of library services. Deanna advises teaching assistants and faculty to meet “with a librarian before the semester begins to talk about the topic and goals of the course and ways in which the librarian might use some of the instructional time to get to know students (and for students to get to know their librarian).” Bailey recommends a library tour for everyone new to Mizzou. She advises her fellow graduate students to form a relationship with their subject librarian “because we’re more likely to ask questions if we’ve established that relationship.” In her case, that was also Anne, whom she also visited for research help on her master’s thesis. She says, “I can’t really express how much Anne has helped me these past two years. I don’t think I could have accomplished many of the things I wanted to accomplish in my classroom or as a student if I hadn’t had that relationship.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: In-Person Library Instruction Leads to Online Instruction

Cycle of Success: In-Person Library Instruction Leads to Online Instruction

PhD student and essayist Corinna Cook’s personal research interests include the lyric essay, literary journalism, indigenous literature and cinema, and posthumanism. As a teaching assistant, she reached out to Paula Roper for library instruction for her English 1000 courses exploring mass incarceration. Both her on-ground and online students benefited from Paula’s help navigating library resources related to the course’s theme and their specific research assignment.

Corinna’s students read Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness and then identified an aspect they’d like to research and consider from other perspectives. They were required to consult a source cited in the original text in their research essays. As Corinna says, “Her book incorporates an enormous amount of research, so virtually any passage/topic they’ve chosen to supplement will include references and citations.” Paula concurs, “Alexander uses citations from a wide range of materials including books, books chapter, magazines, journals, newspapers, reports, and court cases.” In terms of their own research, students were also required to use one popular and one scholarly source.

For the in-person library session, Paula introduced students to the library and demonstrated the stages of research required for the assignment. Corinna says, “Paula incorporated passages from Alexander’s book, linked them to references from Alexander’s endnotes, and demonstrated research steps that exactly mimicked the assignment’s requirements. Paula was also on board as our class librarian: she met with students one-on-one, answered emails, and supported individual research processes as needed.”

Paula Roper

Paula then adapted this lesson, splitting the information into smaller lessons Corinna could integrate into her online course. One lesson illustrated how to use Discover@MU to find articles from popular publications, while the other focused on how to find the sources cited in The New Jim Crow. Corinna describes the lessons as “clear and detailed,” including links to resources from the library and beyond. “Again,” she says, the lessons were “specific to students’ assignment of doing supplemental research responding to The New Jim Crow.” Paula encourages students to reach out for assistance after the library instruction session if they need further assistance, but if they don’t, “it might indicate that the lessons served to answer questions they may have had regarding the library research needed for their work.”

Paula calls Corinna “a clearly dedicated and enthusiastic English 1000 instructor.” She says, “As an important part of the university’s educational effort, the Libraries encourage participation in these collaborative opportunities. Workload considerations coupled with the responsibility for designing lessons demonstrating some of the intricate complexities of research made this effort challenging but worthwhile.” She looks forward to more successful collaborations, “convinced that this enhanced the educational experience of our students.”

Corinna found Paula through a circuitous route: “I think I went scrolling around through the subject librarian pages. Why did I do this? I don’t remember. Following a rabbit hole for something unrelated to teaching. Best rabbit hole ever: I found out we have a social sciences librarian affiliated with the Black Studies program who had created pages and pages of these elaborate library guides–on slam poetry, on the contemporary African diaspora, on hip hop, on historical trauma. . . . In other words, I accidentally found out there was an expert invested in teaching research skills on themes related to my own class.”

Her advice to other instructors is to contact the subject librarian in the field of your class’s theme. “Dig around, click around, do your homework,” Corinna says. “Take the initiative to introduce yourself, bring a clear plan to the table, then ask genuinely open questions and listen to the feedback.” 

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Staying Ahead of the Curve at Fridays @ the Library

Cycle of Success: Staying Ahead of the Curve at Fridays @ the Library

Assistant teaching professor of physical therapy Brad Willis found out about the Fridays @ the Library workshop series after enrolling in the educational leadership and policy analysis program through the College of Education. He became full-time faculty in 2015 after several years of practice as a physical therapist. He teaches advanced courses on geriatric rehabilitation as well as foundational science courses in the doctoral program. He says, “As I grow into my new academic role, I hope to investigate curricular assessment strategies for allied health programs.”

In September, he attended “Staying Ahead of the Curve,” taught by Kimberly Moeller. Brad says, “During my previous coursework and early career as a faculty member at MU, I did not fully appreciate the scope of resources available to students and employees.”  The workshop provided him with an overview of library resources and services, ranging from the vast array of specialized databases to “the individualized attention and subject expertise of trained library science staff” to “ways young and experienced scholars may increase the visibility of their work and tools to greatly improve the efficiency of academic writing.”

Kimberly Moeller

Kimberly enjoys the opportunity to show that Mizzou Libraries have a lot more to offer than just books and articles. She says, “Sharing the different resources is a pleasure.”

Impressed by Kimberly’s teaching and audience engagement, Brad admits, “It was apparent that we were only skimming the surface during this session.” He says he will use her tips and tricks for years to come in his dual role as a faculty member and PhD student. Brad recommends getting to know your subject librarian and attending programming targeted to your interests and needs. His only regret is not attending a Fridays @ the Library workshop sooner.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Dr. Dannecker and Physical Therapy Evidence-Based Practice

Cycle of Success: Dr. Dannecker and Physical Therapy Evidence-Based Practice

Erin Dannecker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy. Since 2004, she has been teaching Evidence-Based Practice to between 44 to 60 Doctorate of Physical Therapy students with Rebecca Graves’ assistance. “Health professionals must learn how to search literature databases quickly and efficiently because they have little time in between treating patients. Rebecca teaches our students to do just that by delivering professional lecture recordings, a guest lecture, and individual tutoring. Without Rebecca’s expert and dedicated assistance, I would have to decrease the rigor of the course’s assignments dramatically.”

Rebecca Graves
Education Librarian

Rebecca has also helped Erin with her own literature searches, which Erin tells her students. “I’m always hesitant to write ‘no studies were located’ in a manuscript without using the literature searching skills I have learned from Rebecca and sometimes asking Rebecca to double check for me. It is important for our students to hear about collaboration among researchers, clinicians, patients, and academic librarians and to make the most of the amazing resources that the Health Sciences Library offers such as fast and free interlibrary loans and online and face-to-face training.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Multidisciplinary Research Leads to Publication in Agricultural Journalism Text

Cycle of Success: Multidisciplinary Research Leads to Publication in Agricultural Journalism Text

The Routledge Handbook of Landscape and Food, to be published in 2018, features the chapter “Using the Senses to Write Food Culture and Landscape” by MU’s own Nina Mukerjee Furstenau. As Director of Food Systems Communication and Instructor in Science and Agricultural Journalism, Nina has relied on Noel Kopriva, whom she calls “a jewel in the crown of subject librarians,” for research help many times.

When Nina found herself in need of “research materials on using sensory writing in food and landscape storytelling and how that type of writing effects communication across cultural borders,” she searched on her own but found that her searches were not producing results relating to her particular angle on the topics. That’s when she asked Noel to step in.

Noel Kopriva

Nina admits that she, of course, needed the information “pronto” and was out of the state at the time. She says Noel “not only had good ideas on how to approach the topic, she pointed out specific references and was able to walk me through how to get far-flung sources winging their way to Columbia. She made the entire experience manageable, accessible, and pleasant. Tip of the hat to Noel!”

Noel says, “It was a delight working with someone like Nina, who combines so many disciplines in her writing—makes it really fun to help her do research. She is an amazing patron and person, and I am grateful to have been able to help!”

“Make use of all the offerings at the library—databases, journals, statistics, and more,” Nina advises, but especially “the people there—the librarians—devoted to the exploration of knowledge and how to access it.” She says of Noel, “My personal opinion is that she performs magic.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Judith Goodman and the School of Health Professions

Cycle of Success: Judith Goodman and the School of Health Professions

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Judith Goodman, the Interim Associate Dean of Research for the School of Health Professions, and Gina Scavone, Executive Assistant to the Associate Deans, contacted the Health Sciences Library for help with gathering journal, article, and author metrics for all School of Health Professions faculty. They wanted a better idea of what and where their faculty were publishing, and the impact of their research. Gina Scavone had previously asked for help in Summer 2016 when she was asked to find this same information, but wasn’t sure where to start. Taira Meadowcroft sat down with Gina to show her how she gathered this information, and throughout the summer, Taira, along with Rachel Alexander and Gemille Purnell, gathered the required metrics. Fast forward to Spring 2017, when the School of Health Professions asked for updated metrics, on a short deadline, for their newly added faculty. The Department of Public Health merged with the School of Health Professions, and this merger added a few new faculty members.
“We needed to have the most up-to-date data concerning our faculty’s research profiles with a ridiculously quick turn-around for a presentation. We asked Taira Meadowcroft to find both the WOS and Scopus annual and cumulative number of publications and citations, the h-index, and journal impact factors for each tenured/tenure-track faculty member in the School of Health Professions. She did this efficiently and cheerfully! This partnership of MU Libraries and SHP enabled us to quickly pull together a presentation of SHP’s research growth for UM’s new president. We were so grateful for Taira [and the library’s] help in letting us tell our story.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Linda Hillemann, Clinical Instructor/Online Education and Field Support Specialist in the School of Social Work, works off campus and supports online students in southern Missouri. She was updating a lecture on the history of social work on Canvas when she realized she didn’t have a credit for a diagram by Mary Richmond, one of the founders of social work. Linda describes her research process: “I have digital copies of some of her documents and was pretty sure which one it came from, but I was wrong! Not only was it not from her book Social Diagnosis, it wasn’t in any of the other documents I have. So I started Googling. There are only so many websites devoted to social work history so I was pretty confident I could find it back, but it was much harder than I expected.”

After searching all the sites she knew with all the search terms she could think of to no avail, she contacted her subject librarian, Kimberly Moeller, for help. Kimberly was able to reverse engineer a search, and Linda says, “A mere two hours later I had the reference and a link to the document.”

Linda Hillemann

Kimberly found the original pencil drawing in conference proceedings over a century old. She explains, “The diagram was first presented and published at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in 1901, which didn’t originally come up in the search I ran. However, Richmond’s colleagues were apparently so impressed with her work that the diagram was mentioned in numerous iterations of this same conference, referring back to the proceedings from 1901.” Kimberly provided Linda with a link to the scanned version of the proceedings available through the digital library Hathi Trust, which meant she had immediate access.

Linda had never seen the conference proceedings before and found it be a fascinating historical document. More importantly, it provided the reference she needed to include vital information in her course. She explains that the diagram “demonstrates a clear line of a basic social work concept from our beginnings to current practice. That was something I wanted to demonstrate in this lecture: our connection today to our remarkable history, and thanks to Kim I was able to do that.”

Kimberly Moeller

Linda and her online students rely on Kimberly and other librarians to help them locate and obtain materials since they are not able to visit the library in person. When it comes to using the library or needing research assistance, Linda advises, “If you need something, ask, even if it seems like a pretty wild-eyed request. I think these librarians can pull rabbits out of a hat.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.” This summer, students in the Missouri Scholars Academy reaped those benefits.

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted rising high school juniors from around the state to our campus. Ben Batzer, one of 2017 instructors, described how this residential program benefits Missouri’s most gifted high school students: “They take intensive classes in the fields of their choosing, attend a lecture and speaker series, and learn ways they can become engaged citizens in their schools and community.”

Ben’s students were researching late twentieth-century topics that related science to science fiction. Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, guided the students by giving them a tour of Ellis Library and showing them how to find primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. She demonstrated how to use online databases to find scholarly information and historical newspapers.

“My students worked with Rachel in conducting periodical research,” Ben said, “which allowed them to pursue queries of their own choosing in order to better understand the historical and cultural influences that bear on literary production. For many students, this project was the most sustained research they had ever conducted.”

Here are a few of the many positive remarks students had about their experience working with Rachel:

  • Thank you for being so passionate about what you do.
  • Thank you for guiding us through the magical world of the library!
  • I’ve spent a lot of time in that library and I probably would have gotten lost if it wasn’t for you!
  • Thank you for sharing your passion for research and your love of the library with us!

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

Cycle of Success: R. B. Moody’s Great Granddaughter

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s land-grant mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

 

Finding Family History on a Visit to the Vet

In June 2017, Kellie Green stopped into the Zalk Veterinary Medical Library after having been at the Veterinary Health Center with her mom and her mom’s dog Stella. Kellie wondered if the library could help her find out any information about her great grandfather, R.B. Moody. She knew that he had been on the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) faculty, but wasn’t sure exactly when. She also knew that he graduated from Kansas State in 1943.

With that information, Kate Anderson, Head of Zalk Library, and Sue Giger, Library Information Assistant, went to work. One of the best sources of CVM history is the digitized collection of Veterinary Medical Review, the College’s newsletter published from 1967 to 2007. Because this MOspace collection is full-text searchable, they could quickly pinpoint articles of interest and send them to Kellie.

They found that R.B. Moody served on the Mizzou faculty from 1948-1951 and went on to work for the USDA’s Missouri office. As an added bonus, they found that Kansas State had digitized its collection of graduation composites!

 

 

Kellie was thrilled to find out these bits of information that help fill in some gaps in their family’s knowledge:

Oh my goodness!!!! I am overwhelmed with gratitude!! I cannot thank you both enough for taking time out of your day to research this for our family!!! My grandma will be overjoyed. He is greatly missed. It is so nice to see his handsome face on that graduation photo 🙂

I can’t wait to relay the info to my mom and grandma!! Thank you both so very much, that was so kind of you!!! We are so appreciative!

For Kate and Sue, the question was a fun reminder that they never know what they’ll be asked. As Sue commented, “Throw any question at us. We’re on it.”

 

Thank you, Kellie, for letting us highlight this story about your family!
And thank you to the MOspace team for digitizing CVM history and bringing it to life!

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Robert Altenbernd recently submitted a story about his experience working with Gwen Gray, our Social Sciences Librarian, during his time in the in the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) program. EBV is a "one-of-a-kind initiative designed to leverage the skills, resources and infrastructure of higher education to offer cutting-edge, experiential training in entrepreneurship and small business management to post-9/11 veterans with service-connected disabilities and a passion for entrepreneurship. The aim of the program is to open the door to economic opportunity for our veterans by developing their competencies in creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture." There are three phases, and Phase 2 is a nine-day residency at an EBV university. All of the participants apply to the program and go through an interview process.  This year, 19 are on the Univeristy of Missouri campus, for eight days.  There are three from Missouri, but participants come from North Carolina, New Mexico, Colorado, Minnesota, D.C., all across the country.  Their business ideas range from nonprofits that will serve post-9/11 veterans to retail storefronts to making apparel for reenactors. This is the second year Mizzou has participated in the program, and this participation was featured in Inside Columbia magazine last year. 


Gwen Gray's role, as one of the 11 EBV librarians around the country, is to be the support person for these participants while they are on campus, and after they leave. "Dr. Greg Bier (retired Army veteran) who runs the program, is a big proponent of the library and feels like too many entrepreneurs don’t know about the resources & services we offer." Phase 2 includes instruction within MU Libraries, and access to a guide created by Gwen. The guide includes information they can only access while here, links to free sites, and also links to the EBV Info Portal that participants have access to one year after starting the program. Gwen also sends the participants home with a handout, specific to each veteran, that includes information on public and academic libraries in their home areas as well as other sources of help to local entrepreneurs. She includes any useful databases and contact information for business librarians and Small Business Development Center counselors. This handout was a big hit during this program's inagural year at Mizzou: "Second, I want you to know I followed up with the small business development center you located near my home. Staff sat down with me and busted out my business financials. It was a lifesaver. I felt much more confident sending sound financial docs to lenders. I've secured land and my loan package is currently being processed. I owe you one."


Robert Altenbrend recently participated in Phase 2 of EBV, and had some kind words to say about Gwen's help:

"I am currently attending the EBV in-residence phase at Mizzou. I was having difficulties finding research data on starting a veteran support nonprofit. Gwen Gray was very helpful and found several resources that will assist with this project. This type of customer service and professionalism should be commended and reflects positive on Mizzou. This is coming from a lifelong Jayhawk who grew up in the Lawrence area:-) Please pass on my appreciation to her. Thank you."

We forgive Robert for his Jayhawk love, and wish him well with the rest of the program! 

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.