home Cycle of Success, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Interlibrary Loan Delivers for Doctors in a Time Crunch

Interlibrary Loan Delivers for Doctors in a Time Crunch

Ever wonder who is behind the magic of Interlibrary Loan? At the Health Sciences Library it’s Katy Emerson.

She’s the one who receives your requests, scans what you need, and emails it to your inbox, all in the matter of a few hours.

If you search for an article and are hit with a paywall or told the library doesn’t have access, don’t worry! You can request it and Katy will work her magic.

Not only will she find articles the library doesn’t have access to, she will often scan items we have on site to save you the trip to your library.

“What I like most is getting to deliver articles to clinicians. It feels good knowing that the work I do could be having a positive impact on patient care.”

Last year, Katy and the Health Sciences Library’s Interlibrary Loan department borrowed close to 4500 articles and delivered another 1800 articles we had available on site all at no cost to our users. Interlibrary Loan is a free service for Mizzou.

To request articles and books, click on the Findit@MU button if it’s available or you can always fill out a request form.

 

 

 

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Libraries Are Where You Go When You Run out of Ideas

Libraries Are Where You Go When You Run out of Ideas

Research Enriches Undergraduate Writers’ Creative Nonfiction

Julija Šukys, Assistant Professor of English and creative nonfiction writer, says, “Libraries are one of my great loves. I’m a huge champion of libraries.” Much of her work is deeply researched, including her most recent books. Epistolophilia: Writing the Life of Ona Šimaitė is an unconventional biography of the Lithuanian librarian whose heroic actions saved an untold number of lives during the Holocaust, while Siberian Exile: Blood, War, and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning, published in October, investigates her own family’s complicated history.

Julija introduces her advanced undergraduate students to the pleasures of combining research and creative work by incorporating a library research day into all of her nonfiction workshops. She finds that sometimes students at this level are “starting to tell the same stories over and over again,” and research is “a way of showing them how you break out of that, how you break out of writing the same narratives. It’s a way of showing them that there’s a bigger world and to look up, to look out, and to learn something as you write. Writing is a way of actually understanding the world better.”

Example Research Topics: the history and evolution of pinball, Berlin nightclub culture, narcissistic personality disorder and marriage, personality formation in fraternal versus identical twins, the hemp industry in the United States, the link between ear infections in children and the development of speech disorders, the influence of anxiety and depression on memory formation, the history of women in cycling, and American mobility and student mobility across the countryStudents begin by drafting personal essays and then are instructed to ask themselves, “What’s the piece that I could crack open with the help of research?” At this point, Julija sends Anne Barker, her subject librarian, their list of research questions. Because the topics arise out of students’ personal stories and interests, this list can be quite quirky.

By the time students show up at the library, Anne has gathered resources appropriate to the various topics. These workshops meet for weekly for two and a half hours, so one class session can accommodate both instruction and practice. During the first half of the session, Anne introduces them to library databases and also demonstrates search strategies that facilitate research “in the broadest terms.” Julija says, “We search really wide-ranging stuff, both scholarship as well as how to find things on Google Books, how to find movies, how to find video clips that are going to be interesting and useful. Students learn that there’s this enormous world that’s available to them.”

Then during the second half of the session, students begin their quest to find two sources for their essays. They have time to run searches, ask questions, and find books in the stacks. Julija reports that students often have their first experience requesting books through MOBIUS or interlibrary loan, or as she calls it, experiencing “the pleasure of having books sent to you from other places in the world.” Some of her students end up using maps or newspapers or doing genealogical research. “What I really want them to learn,” Julija says, “is how to work in a library and how to think about resources and for them to discover the pleasure of working both with archival materials and with books.”

This assignment brings what Anne calls her “detective instincts” to the forefront. She says, “I enjoy working individually with the students to think of different angles to pursue and different types of materials that could augment their research and then seeing them return with the things they’ve discovered. It’s like opening a treasure chest whose contents they can continue to explore for a long time.”

Anne Barker

In addition to helping students find new possibilities in their writing, Anne’s instruction helps Julija accomplish her mission of teaching her students how to use libraries. “Libraries are good places to work, and libraries are places for solace,” she tells them. “Libraries can be this place where you go when you’ve run out of ideas.”

Julija advises other instructors interested in incorporating library instruction into their classes to “plan it in advance and contact the subject librarian early.” She has also found that giving students concrete tasks helps them be able to put what they’ve learned to immediate use, and another recommendation is to “give students class time to do the hands-on work.” Conducting their own research with a librarian available gives students an appropriate balance of independence and support. “It’s very individualized, and on the other hand they’re learning transferable skills.”

Julija’s advice to students is simple: “Talk to a reference librarian because they have skills you can’t even imagine.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Debbie Parker, instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, pinpoints a key challenge for international students: “Avoiding plagiarism is a daunting task for all students, but it is complicated by the fact that international students have different ideas about what is expected when using support in papers or presentations.”

A major assessment of the Intensive English Program’s students’ mastery of academic English is a formal speech using PowerPoint. This speech must incorporate research and requires students to produce a bibliography. Debbie took her colleague Mary Browning’s advice and contacted Cindy Cotner, the librarian for international students, to set up an instruction session about avoiding plagiarism.

Cindy immediately thought of LibWIS, a series of library workshops for international students. Two of Ellis Library’s Graduate Reference Assistants, Haley Gillilan and Victoria Knight, had recently taught a workshop on just this topic. Planning and teaching workshops is just part of the professional-level training and experience Haley and Victoria receive as GRAs while they complete their degrees in library science. They also provide research assistance in person at the Research Help and Information Desk as well as online through our chat service and assist librarians with other projects.

Haley Gillilan
Haley Gillilan

Cindy suggested that Haley and Victoria teach the session since they had already prepared a lesson on plagiarism specifically for international students. She says, “I am grateful that Debbie granted permission for our graduate students to teach in her classroom. Her students were engaged and asked good questions, and I think this activity was a learning experience for all!”

The instruction session went beyond a dry summary of “how to cite sources in academic classes without plagiarizing.” As part of Haley and Victoria’s presentation, they assessed students’ understanding using example citations. Debbie explains, “They asked the students to guess which ones were correct. If it wasn’t acceptable, the students needed to explain what was wrong with it.”

Learning about plagiarism and potential consequences from current students beholden to the same university standards of academic integrity helped reinforce the message in a unique way. Debbie says, “It also made it easier for me to reinforce the importance of citing their sources because I could refer back to the visit and remind them about the presentation that they heard.”

Victoria Knight
Victoria Knight

Victoria and Haley benefited from the opportunity to modify a workshop they’d taught before for use in an individual classroom. Victoria says, “Plagiarism is such a big topic and can differ so greatly from country to country. It was an amazing opportunity to get to take one of our library sessions out into the actual classroom. I think it was really beneficial, and it was a fun class to teach.” Haley sums it up well: “I hope that the class helped them with their academic success at Mizzou!”

Debbie wants all students, especially international students, to know that “the library offers so much more than just books.” A former student worker in Ellis Library, she says, “Librarians are an under-tapped resource which can save faculty, staff and students time and energy. The resources and the workshops can make the students’ learning experience much fuller.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

This guest post is written by Mary Browning, Instructor at the Center for English Language Learning.

In the fall of 2017, Cindy Cotner, the liaison between Ellis Library and MU international students, and I collaborated on two workshops designed to teach students in my classes about Zotero, an online tool that helps students research, collect, and cite their sources. As an instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, I am interested in discovering ways to enhance the academic experience of international students for whom English is a non-native language. Last fall, Cindy offered a Zotero workshop for 11 of my advanced students who were studying English full-time at the Intensive English Program and 25 international students who were taking my SSC 1150 College Success Seminar at MU.

Mary Browning, Na (Sabrina) Hu, Tianyu (Michael) Bai, and Kazuya Suzuki

During each workshop, Cindy patiently led the students through a progression of steps that allowed them to achieve sufficient mastery to be able to go back to their classrooms and seamlessly use Zotero in subsequent writing assignments. Because of the challenges that many international students face when studying in a non-native language, workshops offered by Ellis Library can greatly enhance their academic experience while at MU.

The Zotero workshop was a definite success: students in both of my classes were able to immediately apply the knowledge and skills they learned in Cindy’s workshop to their academic classes. They reported using Zotero to develop a personal library of relevant research sources, to access this information in real time by incorporating in-text citations while writing their essay drafts, and to create a reference page for their research essays in several strokes.

Mary Browning, Yudi (Gloria) Si, and Junjie (Betty) Qin

I’d advise any MU student, especially international students, to check out and then attend one or many of the workshops offered by Ellis Library to discover tips and techniques to use while researching and writing essays and completing other assignments. MU faculty who are interested in learning more about ways to collaborate with the library, should contact their subject librarian. Cindy is the contact for support of international students.

Mary Browning and Yiqing (Sybil) He

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Cycle of Success, Databases & Electronic Resources, Ellis Library Curriculum on Missouri Trees Finds Worldwide Audience through MOspace

Curriculum on Missouri Trees Finds Worldwide Audience through MOspace

The University of Missouri has long been a partner and sponsor of activities offered by Missouri River Relief, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to connecting people to the Missouri River.  Now MOspace, the University of Missouri’s online repository, is partnering with Missouri River Relief to offer curriculum material to K-12 schools in Missouri. Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms: A Guide for Students is the first of these materials. Two Mizzou students assisted with its creation.

Missouri River Relief has removed 876 tons of trash from the river with the help of 23,000 volunteers over the past 16 years and has also reached 18,000 students through interdisciplinary and experiential educational events. Kristen Schulte, Missouri River Relief’s Education Coordinator, says these events are designed to “engage students’ innate sense of wonder and natural curiosity. We believe this approach inspires community engagement, academic achievement, and a sense of stewardship.”

Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms is not a foolproof taxonomic tree ID guide but instead a guide for a hands-on learning experience for elementary through high school students. It focuses on Missouri River floodplain trees’ bark rather than leaves, a unique approach to teaching and learning tree species. Many Missouri River floodplain trees are very tall with leaves out of reach, while tree bark is at the student level.

Kristen Schulte

Kristen knew that more young people would learn about Missouri River floodplain trees through this method if the guide were freely available online. As a graduate student at the University of Wyoming, she worked on Yellowstone Youth Conservation Corps Resources Education Curriculum, seventeen lessons designed for the youth employed in the program. The curriculum is housed in the Wyoming Scholars Repository, which tracks how many times it has been downloaded. “When I started working for Missouri River Relief,” Kristen says, “I knew that we wanted to have a similar curriculum for the Missouri River, and it would be helpful to have the statistical information of the downloads, which we are not able to capture on our website. So I reached out to Noël and Felicity and they were supportive of the idea.”

Felicity Dykas, Head of Digital Services, saw the collection as a good fit for MOspace, and Noël Kopriva, Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Librarian, agreed. Felicity says, “One of our goals for MOspace is to preserve research and scholarship and to make these resources available to the Mizzou community and others worldwide.”

The reach of Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms has truly been international. It was added to MOspace in August 2017, and Felicity shares that “It’s already been downloaded more than 400 times, including by people in China, France, Serbia, and the United Kingdom, among other countries.”

Missouri River Relief is developing additional resources to be uploaded to MOspace, including Missouri River Curriculum, Missouri River Information Packets, and Missouri River STEM Challenges.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Roots N Blues Musician Finds Time for Research

Cycle of Success: Roots N Blues Musician Finds Time for Research

When lifelong musician Murry Hammond came to Columbia with his band of twenty-five years, Old 97’s, for the Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival, he couldn’t pass up the opportunity to spend a few days conducting research in Ellis Library. In addition to being a musician, Murry describes himself as a “lay historian with a lifelong passion for preservation and writing history, specializing in transportation and industrial history of primarily Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma.” He has digitized and published thousands of images to his website Texas Transportation Archive over the past two decades and is the author of East Texas Logging Railroads.

How did Murry find out that Ellis Library had a wealth of resources in his areas of specialty? The answer is WorldCat, the online catalog that searches the collections of libraries worldwide. Old 97’s had been a Blue Note regular for years, but Murry never had enough time in Columbia for any real research. When they performed at Roots N Blues, however, he flew in several days early and had a “dream visit.”

Eric Cusick, Murry Hammond, Karen Eubanks

Eric Cusick, Karen Eubanks, and Burt Fields were the key staff members who helped make Murry’s time at Ellis Library a successful one. Karen describes her colleagues at the Circulation and Help Desk as the “face of the library” as students and visitors often ask their very first questions there–and the questions vary widely. Students may need anything from directions to the research help desk to a band-aid, and visitors may be curious about events on campus or downtown. Because each circulation team member has different strengths and experiences, they are able to help people find the information (or bandages) they need.

Murry initially corresponded with Eric about the materials he needed before his arrival, and Karen set him up in a location conducive to using his scanner and safely handling fragile materials. She says, “When Murry arrived early one morning at the circulation desk ready to begin his work, I was able to locate a quite study space in our offices that was suitable for his research as he had brought his own scanner and needed a large desk area to accommodate the many large volumes he had requested through Eric from the depository,” the off-campus storage facility. Burt worked with library staff at the depository to help Murry retrieve additional materials as needed during his visit. Murry spent three days, one clocking in at 16.5 hours, conducting research in Ellis Library and was back in December to work with more library materials.

“Mizzou Libraries helped significantly cut down my time at the New York Public Library and the Library of Congress,” Murry says. “I’ve been in literally dozens of the major archives and special collections in most of the lower 48 states, and Mizzou Libraries is in easily in my top ten, at least for what I research. Thank you!”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to produce and disseminate knowledge that will improve the quality of life in the state, the nation and the world.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Government Information Cycle of Success: Missouri’s Government Information Guru

Cycle of Success: Missouri’s Government Information Guru

Tove Klovning, who serves as US, MO, and EU Government Documents Depository Coordinator as well as Foreign/Comparative/International Law Librarian & Lecturer in Law at Washington University in St. Louis, often interacts with researchers seeking access to both historical and current government information. She explains, “Preserving government information and making it accessible for both current researchers and future generations is an important task for depository libraries.” In her work at a sub-regional and Federal depository library, she has benefited from the direction and guidance of Marie Concannon, Missouri’s regional coordinator for the Federal Depository Library Program and Head of Government Information and Data Archives here at Mizzou Libraries.

Tove says she “honestly could not have wished for a more competent Regional Depository Coordinator. Marie is always there to answer any questions we may have and is always willing to offer training, updates, and continuing education to both new and established depository librarians on a regular basis.” For example, when Tove needed input regarding weeding the local collection, Marie consulted with her.

Marie has also worked to help libraries free up much-needed space while retaining government resources in the region: “Thanks to her great work with area depository librarians, an Intrastate Regional agreement was put into place in 2012.” This model encouraged depository libraries to stay in the program, Tove explains, since sharing resources helps each individual library better cope with the perpetual struggle of space issues. Marie met face-to-face with about a dozen depository libraries in St. Louis to facilitate the process of drafting this agreement.

Marie Concannon

In terms of training and support for depository librarians in the region, Tove has found that Marie plays a vital role as educator. A frequently consulted resource is a guide for Missouri FDLP members which helps librarians navigate the federal depository system. Marie built and maintains this guide to facilitate online access to crucial information for these librarians and help keep them informed of training opportunities and conferences.

Organizing workshops and conferences is another way Marie makes sure librarians can get up-to-date training on government information so that they can help patrons access the data they need. In November, Missouri state government employees and both academic and public library employees attended the Missouri State Government Information Conference, which she co-organized. The 2017 theme was “Sunshine and Missouri’s Digital Future,” taking its name from the state Sunshine Law. Marie says the conference’s purpose is “to bridge the gap between libraries and government, and help lay groundwork for closer partnership on projects involving government information accessibility.”

For all of these reasons and more, as Tove says, “We are very fortunate to have Marie as our Federal and State Regional Coordinator.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva Wins Center for Research Libraries’ 2017 Award for Teaching

Cycle of Success: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva Wins Center for Research Libraries’ 2017 Award for Teaching

Daniel B. Domingues da Silva, former Assistant Professor of History at Mizzou, won the Center for Research Libraries2017 Award for Teaching, part of their annual Primary Source Awards. Rachel Brekhus, Humanities Librarian, nominated him for his creative use of primary sources in his Writing Intensive course Fighting the Atlantic Slave Trade.

Now an assistant professor of African history at Rice University, Daniel held the same position at Mizzou from 2012 to 2017, teaching courses on the history of early and modern Africa. His research focuses on the African slave trade, especially from West Central Africa, and he has participated in several digital humanities projects such as Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database and Visualizing Abolition: A Digital History of the Suppression of the African Slave Trade. Visualizing Abolition was developed here at Mizzou.

Rachel Brekhus

Daniel credits Rachel and other Mizzou librarians with playing key roles in his research and teaching. “They not only helped me secure important primary and secondary sources for my research,” he says, “but they also created study guides for my students, workshops on how to conduct research, and trained students in operating related equipment and computer softwares. They also reviewed applications and nominated students and myself to internal and external research and teaching awards.”

Humanities librarian Anne Barker provided students with valuable insights into copyright issues and the use of images. Digital services librarian Felicity Dykas trained students on scanning techniques and image specifications. In the spring of 2017, Ellis Library hosted an exhibit about the making of the Visualizing Abolition project, providing students an opportunity to showcase their work.

Anne Barker

Prior to the CRL Award for Teaching, Daniel had won teaching awards within the University of Missouri campus community and considers those awards “an important way of rewarding faculty for their teaching achievements” and letting faculty know they are on the right track. However, he says “the CRL award was something different. As a global consortium of research libraries, it meant that I was not only a good teacher among my peers at Mizzou, but that my teaching skills were also appreciated among a much larger community of scholars.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Cycle of Success: Grant Elementary School

Cycle of Success: Grant Elementary School

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university, no matter their age. The fifth graders from Grant Elementary School recently visited the Special Collections Department to get an in-depth look what the department has to offer.

Matt Kuensting and John Nies, fifth grade teachers at Grant Elementary, recognize the importance of community connections, and five years ago, revised their practice to focus on community connections. Since their revision, they have taken their students into the community to observe and cultivate their interests, and one of those stops is to Special Collections. Kelli Hansen, Tim Perry and the Special Collections staff, took the students through three stations based in the evolution of technology, map making, and historical botany books.

“Ellis Library is one of our first places we visit, and many kids favorite place. These experiences are very impactful for us because our students are currently studying observing organisms like plants, they are making maps of their own imaginative worlds, and technology is one of the biggest integrations in our community project.”

We asked John Nies what advice he would give for those interested in using the library: “[The] advice I would give to those interested in using the library is… GO!  Spend some time walking around the displays in the main hall, visit the Special Collections, and wander a bit. The staff has always been helpful. The building itself is fascinating and it holds an eternity of interesting materials.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Save

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Nursing Student Obtains Invaluable Assistance with Literature Review

Cycle of Success: Nursing Student Obtains Invaluable Assistance with Literature Review

My name is Erin, and I am a second year distance student in the BSN-to-PhD program at the MU Sinclair School of Nursing. My interest in researching type 1 diabetes (T1D) began three years ago, when my son (who was 9 years old at the time) was diagnosed with T1D. I have particular interests in data science and precision medicine, and my long-term goals involve the identification of pathophysiologic subtypes (i.e., phenotypes) of type 1 diabetes.

I am currently participating in a research practicum with Dr. Sonal Patil (MU Department of Family and Community Medicine) and as a part of this practicum, I am completing a systematic search of the literature pertaining to diabetes caregivers. Setting up and executing systematic searches can seem like such a daunting task (especially the first time around!) and Dr. Patil and my PhD advisor, Dr. Bonnie Wakefield, suggested that I talk with the health sciences librarians to ask for their assistance with developing appropriate search strategies. So I took their advice and went to the Health Sciences Library when I was on campus in early October.

Rebecca Graves

When health sciences librarian Rebecca Graves heard that I was at the library and that I had questions about how to begin my search, she stopped the work that she was doing that afternoon so that she could attend to my questions. Although I didn’t ask her to do that, my needs were important to her and she made time to give me the assistance I needed. She proceeded to work with me for quite some time, advising me on how to carry out a literature search, and walking me through a search in one database so that I could begin the process myself when I got back home.

During the last couple of weeks, I have had many additional questions about how to set up searches in other databases and Diane Johnson is the health sciences librarian who has helped me craft these other search strategies. Individuals who know me well know that I ask a lot of questions and Diane has been incredibly patient in answering my questions and concerns. For example, when I was having trouble acquiring search results in one database, Diane recognized that the issue was caused by a problem with the search syntax in that database (rather than by something I was doing wrong). She contacted the support specialists for that database,explained the issue, and she went on to craft a workaround for me that I could use to complete my search in the meantime! Her advice about fashioning appropriate searches in each database has been invaluable. She has even met with me online on two separate occasions so that I could share my computer screen with her, show her my search strategies, and request her assistance.

Diane Johnson

Effectively using research databases is challenging because the search syntax is different in each database. We are fortunate here at MU to have access to truly exceptional health sciences librarians who bring with them many years of experience and who possess the expertise that students need to be successful. Before you begin your research, do yourself a favor: reach out to the librarians and consult with them about your research needs. I’d also like to encourage graduate students to access the many additional resources available at the library including online and on campus classes and workshops , the after-hours “Ask the Librarians!” chat feature, and library email updates. Distance students can use MU Connect to schedule a time to consult with a librarian. These resources exist to help students be successful — so be sure to take advantage of them!

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research. 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.