home Cycle of Success, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Judith Goodman and the School of Health Professions

Cycle of Success: Judith Goodman and the School of Health Professions

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Judith Goodman, the Interim Associate Dean of Research for the School of Health Professions, and Gina Scavone, Executive Assistant to the Associate Deans, contacted the Health Sciences Library for help with gathering journal, article, and author metrics for all School of Health Professions faculty. They wanted a better idea of what and where their faculty were publishing, and the impact of their research. Gina Scavone had previously asked for help in Summer 2016 when she was asked to find this same information, but wasn’t sure where to start. Taira Meadowcroft sat down with Gina to show her how she gathered this information, and throughout the summer, Taira, along with Rachel Alexander and Gemille Purnell, gathered the required metrics. Fast forward to Spring 2017, when the School of Health Professions asked for updated metrics, on a short deadline, for their newly added faculty. The Department of Public Health merged with the School of Health Professions, and this merger added a few new faculty members.
“We needed to have the most up-to-date data concerning our faculty’s research profiles with a ridiculously quick turn-around for a presentation. We asked Taira Meadowcroft to find both the WOS and Scopus annual and cumulative number of publications and citations, the h-index, and journal impact factors for each tenured/tenure-track faculty member in the School of Health Professions. She did this efficiently and cheerfully! This partnership of MU Libraries and SHP enabled us to quickly pull together a presentation of SHP’s research growth for UM’s new president. We were so grateful for Taira [and the library’s] help in letting us tell our story.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Linda Hillemann, Clinical Instructor/Online Education and Field Support Specialist in the School of Social Work, works off campus and supports online students in southern Missouri. She was updating a lecture on the history of social work on Canvas when she realized she didn’t have a credit for a diagram by Mary Richmond, one of the founders of social work. Linda describes her research process: “I have digital copies of some of her documents and was pretty sure which one it came from, but I was wrong! Not only was it not from her book Social Diagnosis, it wasn’t in any of the other documents I have. So I started Googling. There are only so many websites devoted to social work history so I was pretty confident I could find it back, but it was much harder than I expected.”

After searching all the sites she knew with all the search terms she could think of to no avail, she contacted her subject librarian, Kimberly Moeller, for help. Kimberly was able to reverse engineer a search, and Linda says, “A mere two hours later I had the reference and a link to the document.”

Linda Hillemann

Kimberly found the original pencil drawing in conference proceedings over a century old. She explains, “The diagram was first presented and published at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in 1901, which didn’t originally come up in the search I ran. However, Richmond’s colleagues were apparently so impressed with her work that the diagram was mentioned in numerous iterations of this same conference, referring back to the proceedings from 1901.” Kimberly provided Linda with a link to the scanned version of the proceedings available through the digital library Hathi Trust, which meant she had immediate access.

Linda had never seen the conference proceedings before and found it be a fascinating historical document. More importantly, it provided the reference she needed to include vital information in her course. She explains that the diagram “demonstrates a clear line of a basic social work concept from our beginnings to current practice. That was something I wanted to demonstrate in this lecture: our connection today to our remarkable history, and thanks to Kim I was able to do that.”

Kimberly Moeller

Linda and her online students rely on Kimberly and other librarians to help them locate and obtain materials since they are not able to visit the library in person. When it comes to using the library or needing research assistance, Linda advises, “If you need something, ask, even if it seems like a pretty wild-eyed request. I think these librarians can pull rabbits out of a hat.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.” This summer, students in the Missouri Scholars Academy reaped those benefits.

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted rising high school juniors from around the state to our campus. Ben Batzer, one of 2017 instructors, described how this residential program benefits Missouri’s most gifted high school students: “They take intensive classes in the fields of their choosing, attend a lecture and speaker series, and learn ways they can become engaged citizens in their schools and community.”

Ben’s students were researching late twentieth-century topics that related science to science fiction. Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, guided the students by giving them a tour of Ellis Library and showing them how to find primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. She demonstrated how to use online databases to find scholarly information and historical newspapers.

“My students worked with Rachel in conducting periodical research,” Ben said, “which allowed them to pursue queries of their own choosing in order to better understand the historical and cultural influences that bear on literary production. For many students, this project was the most sustained research they had ever conducted.”

Here are a few of the many positive remarks students had about their experience working with Rachel:

  • Thank you for being so passionate about what you do.
  • Thank you for guiding us through the magical world of the library!
  • I’ve spent a lot of time in that library and I probably would have gotten lost if it wasn’t for you!
  • Thank you for sharing your passion for research and your love of the library with us!

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

Cycle of Success: R. B. Moody’s Great Granddaughter

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s land-grant mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

 

Finding Family History on a Visit to the Vet

In June 2017, Kellie Green stopped into the Zalk Veterinary Medical Library after having been at the Veterinary Health Center with her mom and her mom’s dog Stella. Kellie wondered if the library could help her find out any information about her great grandfather, R.B. Moody. She knew that he had been on the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) faculty, but wasn’t sure exactly when. She also knew that he graduated from Kansas State in 1943.

With that information, Kate Anderson, Head of Zalk Library, and Sue Giger, Library Information Assistant, went to work. One of the best sources of CVM history is the digitized collection of Veterinary Medical Review, the College’s newsletter published from 1967 to 2007. Because this MOspace collection is full-text searchable, they could quickly pinpoint articles of interest and send them to Kellie.

They found that R.B. Moody served on the Mizzou faculty from 1948-1951 and went on to work for the USDA’s Missouri office. As an added bonus, they found that Kansas State had digitized its collection of graduation composites!

 

 

Kellie was thrilled to find out these bits of information that help fill in some gaps in their family’s knowledge:

Oh my goodness!!!! I am overwhelmed with gratitude!! I cannot thank you both enough for taking time out of your day to research this for our family!!! My grandma will be overjoyed. He is greatly missed. It is so nice to see his handsome face on that graduation photo 🙂

I can’t wait to relay the info to my mom and grandma!! Thank you both so very much, that was so kind of you!!! We are so appreciative!

For Kate and Sue, the question was a fun reminder that they never know what they’ll be asked. As Sue commented, “Throw any question at us. We’re on it.”

 

Thank you, Kellie, for letting us highlight this story about your family!
And thank you to the MOspace team for digitizing CVM history and bringing it to life!

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Robert Altenbernd recently submitted a story about his experience working with Gwen Gray, our Social Sciences Librarian, during his time in the in the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) program. EBV is a "one-of-a-kind initiative designed to leverage the skills, resources and infrastructure of higher education to offer cutting-edge, experiential training in entrepreneurship and small business management to post-9/11 veterans with service-connected disabilities and a passion for entrepreneurship. The aim of the program is to open the door to economic opportunity for our veterans by developing their competencies in creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture." There are three phases, and Phase 2 is a nine-day residency at an EBV university. All of the participants apply to the program and go through an interview process.  This year, 19 are on the Univeristy of Missouri campus, for eight days.  There are three from Missouri, but participants come from North Carolina, New Mexico, Colorado, Minnesota, D.C., all across the country.  Their business ideas range from nonprofits that will serve post-9/11 veterans to retail storefronts to making apparel for reenactors. This is the second year Mizzou has participated in the program, and this participation was featured in Inside Columbia magazine last year. 


Gwen Gray's role, as one of the 11 EBV librarians around the country, is to be the support person for these participants while they are on campus, and after they leave. "Dr. Greg Bier (retired Army veteran) who runs the program, is a big proponent of the library and feels like too many entrepreneurs don’t know about the resources & services we offer." Phase 2 includes instruction within MU Libraries, and access to a guide created by Gwen. The guide includes information they can only access while here, links to free sites, and also links to the EBV Info Portal that participants have access to one year after starting the program. Gwen also sends the participants home with a handout, specific to each veteran, that includes information on public and academic libraries in their home areas as well as other sources of help to local entrepreneurs. She includes any useful databases and contact information for business librarians and Small Business Development Center counselors. This handout was a big hit during this program's inagural year at Mizzou: "Second, I want you to know I followed up with the small business development center you located near my home. Staff sat down with me and busted out my business financials. It was a lifesaver. I felt much more confident sending sound financial docs to lenders. I've secured land and my loan package is currently being processed. I owe you one."


Robert Altenbrend recently participated in Phase 2 of EBV, and had some kind words to say about Gwen's help:

"I am currently attending the EBV in-residence phase at Mizzou. I was having difficulties finding research data on starting a veteran support nonprofit. Gwen Gray was very helpful and found several resources that will assist with this project. This type of customer service and professionalism should be commended and reflects positive on Mizzou. This is coming from a lifelong Jayhawk who grew up in the Lawrence area:-) Please pass on my appreciation to her. Thank you."

We forgive Robert for his Jayhawk love, and wish him well with the rest of the program! 

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Resources and Services, Zalk Veterinary Medical Library Cycle of Success: Gwen Gray, Kate Anderson, and Supporting Entrepreneurship

Cycle of Success: Gwen Gray, Kate Anderson, and Supporting Entrepreneurship

Gwen Gray
Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Gwen Gray, Business, Economics & Public Poloicy Librarian, spearheads the libraries’ involvement with a variety of programs. Through her work with Entrepreneurship Alliance students, Gwen promotes the libraries as an integral resource for teaching and research. Greg Bier, Director of the Entrepreneurship Alliance, indicates her positive impact. “I just wanted to thank you for working with my Entrepreneurship Alliance students Tuesday,” Bier said. “I think it is very important that they understand the tools right at their fingertips on campus. Unfortunately, not many of them think of Ellis as one of them. I also think you change their opinions. Thanks for being a great help!”

Gwen strives to integrate library resources and services into MU’s entrepreneurship programs. One such program is the Biodesign & Innovation Program. Through her work, Gwen assists Biodesign Fellows as they seek out information and research. The Fellows she works with speak highly of the assistance she provides. “Our Biodesign Filtering presentation tonight was a great success,” one Fellow said. 

Kate Anderson

Kate Anderson is the head of the Zalk Vetinary Medical Library and works with Gwen on a number of projects, including that Biodesign Program and the Coulter Translational Partnership. In Coulter boot camps, teams of physicans and engineeers build their case for funding from the Coulter Foundation. The goal of the Coulter Foundation is to accelerate the translation of biomedical innovations into products the improve patient care.  

Because entrepreneurs need expertise and resources from multiple disciplines, Gwen and Kate collaborate extensively. The biodesign fellows and the boot camp participants often acknowledge Gwen’s and Kate’s teamwork.

  • “I wanted to say a big ‘THANK YOU!’ to both of you for getting us all the information we needed in such a short period of time. You both made the success of [our] presentation possible!”
  • “Thank you so much for checking in with us. It really means a lot to know we have your support!"
  • “Many thanks for your kind help in award.  Really appreciate [Gwen’s] help and Kate’s timely support.”
     


This active collaboration enables the Libraries to have a positive impact on the biotech entrepreneurial climate not only on campus but in the greater mid-Missouri region as well.


If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Marybeth Bohn, Orthopedic Surgery

Cycle of Success: Marybeth Bohn, Orthopedic Surgery

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Marybeth Bohn

 

Maryboth Bohn is the executive assistant to Dr. James P. Stannard, MD. in the Missouri Orthopedic Institute.  Marybeth works in the academic office and assists with administrative paperwork. With a tight deadline approaching, and needing the information by the end of the business day, Marybeth contacted the health sciences library to ask for help in gathering metrics for promotion and tenure. Katy Emerson, Library Specialist Sr. in Interlibrary Loan, gave Marybeth some information on the possible metrics she could use for the Promotion and Tenure packet, while Taira Meadowcroft, Information Services Librarian, and Rachel Alexander, Graduate Library Assistant, gathered the metrics. It was definitely a great collaborative effort! 
 

Rachel Alexander

 

"I work in a fast-paced office assisting Dr. Stannard with his administrative work. Much of that includes academic activities such as reviewing P&T packets, writing letters, and gathering articles for research. If it weren't for the help of the librarians in the Health Science Library, I would be in dire straits! They come to my rescue often! They are quick, upbeat, and always helpful. Recently, I needed publication metrics for a P&T review. Two of the librarians stopped what they were doing to help me and speed things along. They also took the time to explain what everything meant. I also appreciate their helpfulness in pulling articles for me when I am not able to access the articles myself. I have used the online request system and their online chat system quite easily and have always received excellent assistance. Don't hesitate to ask a friendly librarian!"

 

Katy Emerson

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, 
please use the Cycle of Success form

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Susan Scott, PhD., RN.

Cycle of Success: Susan Scott, PhD., RN.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Susan Scott, PhD., RN.
Susan Scott, PhD., RN., Manager of Patient Safety and Risk Management in the Office of Clinical Effectivness at MU Health, makes great use of the health sciences librarians. In order for the patient safety standards, and reviews in the hospital to be evidence-based, Susan regularly sends search requests to Taira Meadowcroft, the designated Quality Improvement library liasion, within the Health Sciences Library. 

Health Sciences Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

"MU Health Care's Patient Safety Team is responsible for the review of clinical care events in which the patient experienced harm from the care rendered. Review of current standards of care and matching them with care rendered is an important part of a comprehensive review. In the past, HSL resources have been an invaluable asset to help us with everything from basic reviews of the literature to more comprehensive and detailed literature reviews. Review of these cases in a timely manner is important. I have found the HSL resources as being highly dependable completing thorough reviews with a quick turnaround time. How awesome to have such amazing resources to help complement our clinical resources! Thank you, HSL and team, for helping us provide the safe care to our patients! Your efforts are truly appreciated but more importantly, I truly appreciate your partnership! Please keep up the great work!"

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form