home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2018

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: October 2018

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article:

Characterization of Licensees During the First Year of Missouri’s Assistant Physician Licensure Program”, was co-authored by Dr. Jim Stevermer of the Department of Family & Community Medicine. The article was published in JAMA (impact factor of 47.661 in 2017).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: http://library.muhealth.org/resourcesfor/faculty/faculty-publications/oct2018/

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

home Government Information, Resources and Services Government Documents give a glimpse at the beginnings of Daylight Saving Time in the U.S.

Government Documents give a glimpse at the beginnings of Daylight Saving Time in the U.S.

“This daylight-saving plan will afford an opportunity to many thousands of working people, those who work in offices and in factories and in mills and probably in mines, and on railroads, so that if they feel disposed they will have an opportunity to use an hour in the evening, or more, to till their gardens. If we are going to start an individual conservation scheme, and it looks as though that idea is going to take root, it will be one of the blessings that will grow out of this world difficulty. It will get the people back to the land, if it is only a square rod or two. It will give them an opportunity to know how to raise produce.”

Thus spoke Mr. Arthur E. Holder, representing the American Federation of Labor, at a hearing before the Committee on Interstate Commerce on Thursday, May 3, 1917, where he was adding his voice to the support of a bill to establish a daylight saving time in the United States.

Harris & Ewing, photographer. Senate Sergeant at Arms Charles Higgins turns forward the Ohio Clock for the first Daylight Saving Time, while Senators William Calder NY, William Saulsbury, Jr. DE, and Joseph T. Robinson AR look on, U.S. Capitol building, Washington, D.C. [Between 1910 and 1920] Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress.
With the end of this year’s Daylight Saving Time approaching on November 4th, MU Libraries’ historical government document collection can shed a little light on the early days of national daylight saving laws (there have been many) in the United States – a little something to think about as you turn your clocks back.

The 1958 Interstate Commerce Commission monograph Standard Time by Thomas E. Pyne examines the Standard Time Act, the result of ‘the agitation for ‘daylight saving’ during World War I to conserve fuel and increase national efficiency”, which caused the first national daylight saving to be inaugurated at 2 o’clock on March 31, 1918.

“The act, approved March 19, 1918, is entitled ‘An act to save daylight and to provide standard time for the United States.’ It served a twofold purpose. It divided the territory of the continental United States into five zones, eastern, central, mountain, Pacific, and Alaska…. It also provided that the time of each zone should be advanced 1 hour on the last Sunday in March of each year and returned to normal time on the last Sunday of October…”

The document gives a glimpse of the situation prior to this act, when each State adopted one of four standards of time “for its own use by statute, ordinance, or more usually, public sentiment or habits”:

“The areas embracing the States, cities, towns, and railroads observing the same standard of time were so irregular as to preclude an attempt to define them even approximately. In some instances localities employed a different time form that of the railroad serving them, and in other instances two railroads serving the same point used different standards of time.”

Imagine how difficult that must have made coordinating travel and the transport of goods!

While the daylight saving provision of this Standard Time Act was short lived (it ended after only two summers), other national daylight saving laws have a curious history in the U.S.—one was reinstated year round during World War II, another was passed in 1966, more—that you can learn more about by visiting the Government Information department at Ellis Library after you enjoy an extra hour of sleep on Sunday.

And now you know a bit more about daylight saving time in the United States, how it was initially coupled with the standardization of the time zones and how it was influenced by railroads and the World Wars.

home Events and Exhibits, Resources and Services Library Resources for Mizzou Extension

Library Resources for Mizzou Extension

Did you attend the MU Extension Summit? The University Libraries gave a presentation on resources available for MU Extension. In case you missed it, the slides and handout are below. As always, if you have any questions, ask a librarian!

 

 

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease: Open Access Blog

Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease: Open Access Blog

In August, the physician research team of Dr. Francis Dailey, Dr. Erica Turse, Dr. Maliha Naseer, Dr. Jack Bragg, and Dr. Veysel Tahran published “Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease,” in the open access journal World Journal of Transplantation (WJT).

Launched in 2011, WJT is devoted to reporting the latest research progress and findings in the field of transplantation. The fact the the journal was an open access journal indexed in Pubmed was a big draw to the team. Dr. Tahran says, “if the journal is open access, your papers and ideas can [reach] more people.” For Dr. Dailey, the instant access was the key factor for an open access journal as well. “As a reader of the medical literature I prefer the articles I search for to be open access for ease of obtaining access, and I want others to have this ease as well.”

This review presents current literature of stem cell therapy for patients with perianal inflammatory bowel diseases since the therapy’s emergence in the early 2000s. The team looked at several adipose and bone marrow stem cell studies to analyze the efficacy, outcomes, and safety within those studies. Seeing this as much needed information for their field, the open access journal avenue allowed the team to see their research published sooner rather than later.  “Getting published in this journal was quicker and easier than traditional, subscription-only journals,” mentions Dr. Bragg. Not being a completely print journal gives open access journals the unique ability to review, provide feedback, and publish faster. Open Access journals are able to do this all while still providing quality research.

“There is no difference to me in the manuscript requirements for open access versus other journals. The quality of open access journals is also comparable to that of non-open access journals,” says Dr. Dailey.

If you are interested in publishing in an open access journal, the Health Sciences Library can assist in steering you toward the journals that best fit your research.


Dr. Francis Dailey is a Gastroenterology Fellow at MU Healthcare. He has publishes research related to gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel diseases, clinical gastroenterology, and others. His passion is clinical medicine and gastroenterology, but lovesalso being able to produce clinical research in these fields that can affect everyday clinical practice.

Dr. Jack Bragg is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at MU Healthcare.

Dr. Vesyel Tahran is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine whose research focuses on inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis, and liver cancer, to name a few. in 2017, he was recognized as a Quality Improvement Champion by the MU Healthcare Department of Medicine’s Quality Improvement Committee  for outstanding work in quality improvement. More recently, Dr. Tahran co-edited the book Viral Hepatitis: Chronic Hepatitis B.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services University Libraries Undergraduate Research Contest Call for Submissions

University Libraries Undergraduate Research Contest Call for Submissions

The University Libraries Undergraduate Research Contest recognizes and rewards outstanding research conducted by undergraduate students at the University of Missouri. Undergraduates in any discipline are invited to enter the contest, which will be judged by a cross-disciplinary panel of librarians.

One $500 scholarship, and one $250 scholarship will be awarded to an individual or group project. The winners will have their projects archived in MOspace, MU’s digital repository.

The research project can be a traditional research paper, a musical composition, a work of art, a video, a web page, or other creative work. It has to have been researched using the resources of the MU Libraries. The project will be judged primarily on sophistication of the research process and the materials used (as documented in the Research Process Statement).

Examples of projects:

  • A set design for theater where the student researched period-appropriate furniture, lighting, and architecture to create the perfect backdrop
  • A documentary film for class that researches the history of race relations at MU using library and archive materials
  • Composition of a piece of music created in the style of a famous composer informed by research into their style, skills, etc. through library materials
  • A business plan for a new company or product showing market need, demographics of customers, patents, design, etc. informed by research using library materials
  • A political science paper comparing the rise of fascism today with that in the early 20th century
  • A parody of a famous piece of literature or any original piece of fiction for which the author did library research for their setting, criticisms, etc.

The deadline for submission of all materials is January 31, 2019.

Questions? Contact Rachel Brekhus at brekhusr@missouri.edu.

 

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Digital Media Lab Now Available to Students

Digital Media Lab Now Available to Students

Ellis Library’s Digital Media Lab is now available for student use by appointment.The Digital Media Lab in Room 153 provides a recording booth with various software, a 3D scanner (Structure Sensor), art tablets and virtual reality goggles. The Digital Media Commons also has the film studio in 3E21. Students can request an appointment through the Digital Media Commons website at library.missouri.edu/dmc. The Digital Media Lab is open between the hours of 10 am and 3 pm, Monday through Friday. Feel free to stop by or make an appointment to see all we have to offer.

Health Sciences Library New Books

Check out this month’s new books at the Health Sciences Library. You can use the drop down menu to see previous month’s additions.

Have a purchase recommendation? You can request a book for your teaching or research using this form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2018

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2018

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article:

Glutamate Triggers Long-Distance, Calcium-Based Plant Defense Signaling”, was co-authored by Dr. Abraham J. Koo of the Department of Agriculture Biochemistry. The article was published in Science (impact factor of 41.058 in 2017).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: http://library.muhealth.org/resourcesfor/faculty/faculty-publications/sep2018/

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services More Computers on the Main Floor of the Health Sciences Library

More Computers on the Main Floor of the Health Sciences Library


You asked, we listened: More computers on the main floor!

We recently asked what you’d like to see at the library and a popular answer was more computers (See image below 😊).

Three more computers were placed in the back of the library, in the blue colored room. Not only did we add new computers, the six computers, toward the front of the library, were replaced with newer models.

The library has many computers, both windows and macs, on the 1st floor, but we know computer access is limited when the 1st floor is restricted for exams. We hope these computer additions will provide the access you need.

We welcome any ideas you have to make the library your library.

If you have a recommendation, please contact us or write your ideas on the pad of paper when you first walk in. We love all ideas big and small.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Thanks for Your Input: Library User Survey Results

Thanks for Your Input: Library User Survey Results

The University Libraries conducted the Ithaka S+R survey in the fall of 2017 with the goal of better understanding the research and teaching goals of our faculty and graduate students and their perspectives on the role of the library in helping them to achieve these goals.

Faculty Survey
The survey was distributed by e-mail to all 3,090 faculty members on October 2, 2017. There were 680 respondents who clicked on the survey, with 611 starting the survey and 433 respondents completing the survey for an overall response rate of 14%. Responses were received from faculty in all colleges and schools. Note that law school faculty were not included in this survey process.All respondents answered questions on discovery and access, research practices, perception of students’ research skills, and the role of the library. Respondents were presented randomly with additional modules on library space planning, scholarly communication or market research.

Graduate and Professional Students Survey
The survey was distributed by e-mail to all 6,543 enrolled graduate and professional students on October 2, 2017. There were 1,307 respondents who clicked on the survey, with 1,191 starting the survey (18%) and 939 respondents completing the survey for an overall response rate of 14%. Responses were received from students in all colleges and schools. Note that law school students were not included in this survey process. All graduate student respondents answered questions on higher education objectives, coursework and academics, and role of the library. In addition, respondents were presented randomly with either a module on library space planning or research practices.

Over the next few weeks, the University Libraries will be sharing some of the key findings from the survey. If you would like to see the survey summaries and a complete list of the aggregated results for all questions, visit library.missouri.edu/about.