home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

To Dr. William Krause, education needs to be open and without borders. “We should share information. Not hold it for a select few to access.”

Since the beginning of his Mizzou career in 1971, Dr. Krause has been a proponent of helping students learn and giving them the resources they need. “I’ve always felt very strongly that any student, under my tutelage, should have all their materials provided for them.” He even went as far as writing a couple of textbooks, streamlining them to fit the educational needs of the medical students and taking the extra step to find a publisher to make the textbooks as cheap as possible.

For several years, Dr. Krause taught 96 medical students anatomy and histology. “It was very difficult for me to rotate to all the groups in the labs and answer their questions about the slides. [They] would get frustrated waiting to get my help,” says Dr. Krause. Wanting to make sure his students received the help they needed, he applied for and was awarded a grant to work with a multi-headed microscope for help sessions. With this new equipment, he could easily show this large group the slides. “After three or four years of doing this, even those sessions became too crowded. Everyone wanted the extra help.” Dr. Krause knew he had to find a better way to help his students. When a new chair of the department came on board, Dr. Krause took the opportunity to pitch the chair his new idea.

Screenshot of Dr. Krause’s Blood and Bone Marrow Video

“I wanted to place a camera in the eye piece of the microscope and record me narrating and using the electronic pointer in real time.” The new chair was sold on the idea and gave him the go ahead to buy and use any equipment he needed to create these videos. Dr. Krause developed a set of 24 video tutorials and provided DVD copies for each medical student. That’s a total of 2,304 DVDs per year, mostly out of his own pocket. Eventually, it became too expensive to continue making copies, not to mention the DVDs would damage over time. Dr. Krause turned to the library and asked how could he still provide access to these videos while finding cheaper means of doing so.

Diane Johnson at the Health Sciences Library suggested adding them to Google as it was new and could handle 96 students watching 24 videos. Once placed on Google, Dr. Krause started receiving notes of gratitude not only from his students, but from students all over the world thanking him for sharing his knowledge. After a few years, Google wanted Dr. Krause to shorten the videos. Dr. Krause felt that shortening them would make the videos less helpful. Once again, he turned to the library.

Wanting to keep the integrity of the videos, while still keeping freely available, Dr. Krause consulted with Diane Johnson about how best to proceed. She suggested the new repository the library was managing: MOSpace. Following her advice, Dr. Krause added the videos, along with accompanying educational pdfs, to MOSpace. “I was happy to add to MOSpace. It gives the opportunity for people to tap into information from anywhere and makes it more universal,” explains Dr. Krause.

Top Countries by Downloads from April 2018-October 2018

Dr. Krause, while retired now, still continues to help students here at Mizzou and all over the world. With a total of 4,053 views for the videos and close to 19,000 views for the educational pdfs, users are still finding Dr. Krause’s collection. During the month of September 2018, his videos were downloaded over 800 times.

Dr. Krause cannot be more excited about the open education movement at Mizzou. He may have missed the initiative by three years, but he is happy to know that things are changing on campus. “I am delighted I’ve been able to help so many people from so many areas. This is such a tremendous avenue to make material available in the easiest format possible for our students at [little to] no cost.”

Dr. Krause’s videos, blogs and textbooks are found in MOSpace, where they are free to view and download.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease: Open Access Blog

Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease: Open Access Blog

In August, the physician research team of Dr. Francis Dailey, Dr. Erica Turse, Dr. Maliha Naseer, Dr. Jack Bragg, and Dr. Veysel Tahran published “Review of stem cells as promising therapy for perianal disease in inflammatory bowel disease,” in the open access journal World Journal of Transplantation (WJT).

Launched in 2011, WJT is devoted to reporting the latest research progress and findings in the field of transplantation. The fact the the journal was an open access journal indexed in Pubmed was a big draw to the team. Dr. Tahran says, “if the journal is open access, your papers and ideas can [reach] more people.” For Dr. Dailey, the instant access was the key factor for an open access journal as well. “As a reader of the medical literature I prefer the articles I search for to be open access for ease of obtaining access, and I want others to have this ease as well.”

This review presents current literature of stem cell therapy for patients with perianal inflammatory bowel diseases since the therapy’s emergence in the early 2000s. The team looked at several adipose and bone marrow stem cell studies to analyze the efficacy, outcomes, and safety within those studies. Seeing this as much needed information for their field, the open access journal avenue allowed the team to see their research published sooner rather than later.  “Getting published in this journal was quicker and easier than traditional, subscription-only journals,” mentions Dr. Bragg. Not being a completely print journal gives open access journals the unique ability to review, provide feedback, and publish faster. Open Access journals are able to do this all while still providing quality research.

“There is no difference to me in the manuscript requirements for open access versus other journals. The quality of open access journals is also comparable to that of non-open access journals,” says Dr. Dailey.

If you are interested in publishing in an open access journal, the Health Sciences Library can assist in steering you toward the journals that best fit your research.


Dr. Francis Dailey is a Gastroenterology Fellow at MU Healthcare. He has publishes research related to gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel diseases, clinical gastroenterology, and others. His passion is clinical medicine and gastroenterology, but lovesalso being able to produce clinical research in these fields that can affect everyday clinical practice.

Dr. Jack Bragg is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at MU Healthcare.

Dr. Vesyel Tahran is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine whose research focuses on inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis, and liver cancer, to name a few. in 2017, he was recognized as a Quality Improvement Champion by the MU Healthcare Department of Medicine’s Quality Improvement Committee  for outstanding work in quality improvement. More recently, Dr. Tahran co-edited the book Viral Hepatitis: Chronic Hepatitis B.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library October is Medical Librarians Month

October is Medical Librarians Month

Happy Medical Librarians Month! Something we know you’ve all been waiting for 😉.

In 1997, the Medical Library Association declared October the month of the medical librarian to celebrate and raise awareness of the important work they do. How do your health sciences librarians help, you ask? Oh, let me count the ways we support you:

  • Finding reliable, trustworthy, and evidenced-based literature for projects, big or small
  • Consulting and teaching on effective searching and research; we’ll give you the tips and tricks of the trade
  • Providing the resources you need, whether it be journals, books, etc.
  • Identifying where to publish and tracking the impact of your work
  • Creating guides to make finding the information you need faster

We want to be your first stop on the research journey! We are here for you.

Thank you for letting us do what we love.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Doctor Discovers Librarians Are On Her Research Team

Doctor Discovers Librarians Are On Her Research Team

Dr. Elizabeth Malm-Buatsi didn’t know where to turn when she wanted to improve her standing as a researcher. As the only pediatric urologist at MU HealthCare, and often called away for surgeries, she had no built-in research team she could lean on. After flying solo for a few months, she found herself on the verge of abandoning projects she was passionate about, frustrated by the research process and unsure how to proceed. Luckily, a colleague suggested she contact Diane Johnson at the Health Sciences Library. Dr. Malm-Buatsi says that initial meeting was absolutely lifechanging

When she first contacted Diane, Dr. Malm-Buatsi was creating an educational flyer to give to parents about newborn circumcisions. In order to provide this vital information to parents about the process, she needed to find the best evidence-based research, but she already conducted a literature search and found no information after several hours of searching. Diane, however, was able to find the information in the matter of minutes, at least that’s how Dr. Malm-Buatsi describes it. “Ever since meeting Diane, my outlook on research projects has changed,” she says, “and I’ve learned to enjoy the process. She makes sure to keep me on track, makes the process easier, and helps me think critically about what I’m working on.”

Diane Johnson

Diane’s assistance wasn’t limited to the patient education project. Dr. Malm-Buatsi was also in the midst of applying for an internal grant related to the urinary microbiome. Diane conducted literature searches and created an EndNote Library, not only adding relevant articles, but also pointing out the most relevant sections of information. “Diane was able to cut the time I would’ve spent on researching in half.” Dr. Malm-Buatsi says the grant proposal was recently accepted, and she expects Diane will still be an integral contributor of the project. Diane has also found several additional grant opportunities for Dr. Malm-Buatsi to pursue.

Two projects wasn’t enough for Dr. Malm-Buatsi, though. She also wanted to assess residents’ satisfaction with and the perceived usefulness of an online surgical training system, including a pre-surgery assessment that allows the residents to set goals and view videos before surgery. They determined the best way to capture these qualitative results was developing a survey. Caryn Scoville, Information Services Librarian, consulted with Dr. Malm-Buatsi, designed the survey in Qualtrics, and distributed it to the residents. Dr. Malm-Buatsi and her colleagues submitted an abstract about their system, and although it hasn’t been accepted yet, she is positive it will, in large part because of Caryn’s behind-the-scenes work.

Caryn Scoville

Looking to strengthen your own research profile? Dr. Malm-Buatsi suggests consulting with your librarians from day one of your project and learning how they can contribute to your research process. “They are so open and I feel I can bounce my ideas off of them,” she says. Dr. Malm-Buasi has also discovered an unanticipated benefit: “Now that I am in their minds, I often receive emails with suggestions or pieces of information related to my projects.Their help has had a huge impact on my career.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Health Sciences Library New Books

Check out this month’s new books at the Health Sciences Library. You can use the drop down menu to see previous month’s additions.

Have a purchase recommendation? You can request a book for your teaching or research using this form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library New Art on Display – The Mosaics of Alpana Ray

New Art on Display – The Mosaics of Alpana Ray

The Health Sciences Library is pleased to exhibit the works of artist Alpana Ray. By day she is a Mizzou professor, researching cancer, and by night she’s an artist creating mosaics inspired by sculptures, scenery, and nature. Come in and see the beautifully designed and brightly colored mosaics featuring diverse subject matter.

Angular pieces of glass are skillfully assembled to create graceful, curving lines of the human body in motion and the delicate shapes of butterfly wings. Several of her works on display including Om, a hummingbird and a beachfront.

Dr. Alpana Ray is an entirely self-taught artist who, one day, decided to take more time to explore her artistic side. Alpana’s artwork provides her the opportunity to bring together her two passions: art and being environmentally friendly. She believes in living on a greener earth and chose broken glass pieces as her creative medium. It is her way of recycling what otherwise would be left to a landfill.

When placed near a light source, these hand painted glass shards reflect light off the glass, giving a three dimensional effect, making it look like her mosaics are moving. This illusion is striking when viewed in person.

Below is a small preview of Alpana Ray’s works. Be sure to take a look during your next trip to the Health Sciences Library and leave her a note. The mosaics will be on display through the end of the semester.

 

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2018

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: September 2018

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article:

Glutamate Triggers Long-Distance, Calcium-Based Plant Defense Signaling”, was co-authored by Dr. Abraham J. Koo of the Department of Agriculture Biochemistry. The article was published in Science (impact factor of 41.058 in 2017).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: http://library.muhealth.org/resourcesfor/faculty/faculty-publications/sep2018/

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Hours, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: October 1-5

Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: October 1-5

On October 1-5, the first floor will be restricted to first and second year medical students for testing between the hours of 7:30am to 5:00pm.

If you need a book from the first floor, please visit the Service Desk.

Remember, if you need to print, use the Health Sciences Library Copy Room printers located on the main floor of the library.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services More Computers on the Main Floor of the Health Sciences Library

More Computers on the Main Floor of the Health Sciences Library


You asked, we listened: More computers on the main floor!

We recently asked what you’d like to see at the library and a popular answer was more computers (See image below 😊).

Three more computers were placed in the back of the library, in the blue colored room. Not only did we add new computers, the six computers, toward the front of the library, were replaced with newer models.

The library has many computers, both windows and macs, on the 1st floor, but we know computer access is limited when the 1st floor is restricted for exams. We hope these computer additions will provide the access you need.

We welcome any ideas you have to make the library your library.

If you have a recommendation, please contact us or write your ideas on the pad of paper when you first walk in. We love all ideas big and small.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Hours, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: September 27-28

Exams in Progress at the Health Sciences Library: September 27-28

On September 27-28, the first floor will be restricted to third year medical students for testing between the hours of 7:30am to 5:00pm.

If you need a book from the first floor, please visit the Service Desk.

Remember, if you need to print, use the Health Sciences Library Copy Room printers located on the second floor of the library.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.