MERLIN Catalog Unavailable March 30

Due to server maintenance, the MERLIN Catalog will not be available on Thursday, March 30.

Please consult the information page to learn about services affected.

Contact the Ellis Library Circulation Desk with questions.

HSL Spring Break Hours

March 27th – April 2nd 

Monday 7:00 am – 11:00 pm
Tuesday 7:00 am – 11:00 pm
Wednesday 7:00 am – 11:00 pm
Thursday 7:00 am – 11:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday 10:00 am – 7:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 pm – 1:00 am

For an up-to-date list of all library hours visit: MU Libraries Hours

Dr. Loboa: Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method (Open Access Article)

This week's open access article features Dr. Elizabeth Loboa, Dean of the College of Engineering, and professor of bioengineering. Her research and techincal focuses are tissue engineering & biomaterials, regenerative medicine and wound healing, and stem cells. Take a look at Dr. Loboa's faculty profile to learn more about her role as the dean, as well as her research. 

Dr. Loboa, with her research team, published in the Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Research (JOSR) back in October. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal that encompasses all aspects of clinical and basic research studies related to musculoskeletal issues. JOSR encourages the publication of multidisciplinary research with collaboration amongst clinicians and scientists from different disciplines, which will be the trend in the coming decades. This is why her article is also featured. Dr. Loboa's article is an interdiscplinary collaboration with medicine and engineering. 

Her research in Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method, looked to provide a new method for enhanced cellular infiltration in meniscal allografts. The memiscus is crucial in knee joint function in terms of join stability, and allowing shock absorption, and stress distribution. Their new approach was found to better help better remodel post-surgery, and improve long-term efficacy of meniscal transplantation. 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

Sharing Days Poster Help

Do you have a project that has shown significant process in the past year? If so, why not share your poster during the 5th Annual Sharing Days May 2-4, 2017. 

The library has prepared a wonderful guide for you to refer to. Powerpoint for Posters provides resources for design tips, templates, MU Logos and Colors, infographics, and much more. Of course, there are other ways to create posters, by powerpoint is commonly used. Of course, apart from the layout of your poster, it is important to consider the information that goes on your poster. Does your poster provide enough information? Does it have too much? Be sure to pay special attention to the Evaluating Your Poster tab, which provides a poster evaluation checklist, along with evaluation surverys and rubrics to help you determine if your poster has a focus.  You do want your poster to be visually appealing, but you also want your poster to be informative.


When you have the finished product, the Center for Health Care Quality (CHCQ) will print your poster for free on non-laminated paper. Be sure to check that option when you submit the poster in the QI Tracker. Remember, the deadline to submit your poster is April 16th, either through the QI Tracker or through SharePoint
 

If you would like some one-on-one assistance, Taira Meadowcroft, one of our librarians, is more than happy to schedule a consultation or answer any questions you may have. To contact Taira, you can email her at meadowcroftt@health.missouri.edu or call at 573-884-3575.

The library information desk is also open from 8-5 everyday, as well as our chat service. We are here to help!


*On Friday March 17th at 1pm, MU Libraries will be hosting a workshop entitled Creating a Research Poster, both in person or online. This workshop will provide tools you will need in order to effectively communicate your work with your poster. 

To view last year’s posters, please visit https://mymuhealth.org/2016sharingdays.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

History of Women in STEM


Throughout history, women have been passionate about working hard to create a better future. In 1987, after being petitioned by the National Women's History Project (NWHP), Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as Women's History Month. Today, the NWHP is known nationally as the only clearinghouse providing information and training in multicultural women’s history for educators, community organizations, and parents-for anyone wanting to expand their understanding of women contributions to U. S. This month, the Health Sciences Library is commemorating the notable women in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).


Earlier this month we featured several items from our catalog in this month's book display: History of Women and Medicine. All are fantastic examples of the impact women have had on the history of medicine. All items in the display are still available for check out. 

 

Coninciding with the book display, we created a series of tweets highlighting these extraordinary women. All tweets were inspired by Women in Science- 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World written and illustrated by Rachel Ignotofsky. The book is full of wonderful information, and beautiful illustrations.  Below,  is an excerpt from the book about Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell.


She advocated for better hygiene standards in hospitals and homes, and went on to found the Women's Medical College of of the New York Infirmary in 1868 and the London School of Medicine for Women around 1874. While we don't have this book in our library catalog, we do have some other wonderful items you can check out

 

 

https://www.rachelignotofskydesign.com/

Final impact on the Health Sciences Library of the 1.2 million dollar collections cut

As previously announced, as part of the University Libraries $1.2 million collections cut currently underway, the “big deal” journal packages from Elsevier, Wiley, Springer, and Sage were evaluated and renegotiated. 

That work is now complete, achieving an additional  savings of about $588,000 to count toward the collections cut.   This is the latest is a series of cuts affecting the Health Sciences Library collections

 

What do these cuts mean for the health sciences? 

Delayed access for articles in over 200 journals

As a result of these cuts, instant article access will not be available for over $300,000 in health sciences journals from Wiley, Springer and Sage.  While we will retain online access to back issues for the cancelled titles, articles from 2017 forward will need to be requested via Interlibrary loan.  Most articles arrive within two business days.

 

 Pay more, keep less

Instant access will be maintained to all of the Elsevier titles.  However,  in order to balance the budget, 90 titles  are being converted from purchase to rental access.  Seven of these  titles are health sciences journals.

Despite the loss of permanent archival access to articles in these 90 journals from 2017 forward, the total cost of the Elsevier package  is still over $1 million dollars a year, and will continue to increase by $50,000+ per  year for each of the next 3 years under the terms of the new contract.

 Alternate online access

Despite being removed from their respective packages, we will maintain complete online access to current issues for the following titles through alternate routes:

Clinical Rehabilitation (Sage) 

The Neurohospitalist (Sage)  

Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics (Wiley)

 

What can you do?

Hang on to your author rights when you publish. YOU could be our organization’s best defense against a publishing model in which university faculty give away their work over free, or even pay to have it published, and the libraries must then purchase it back from them at ever-increasing prices.