home Cycle of Success, Resources and Services We’re here to support your teaching and research

We’re here to support your teaching and research

Faculty, as you start the semester, remember that librarians are here to help.

We’re here to support your teaching:

We’re here to support your research:

See our new Research Support page for information on…

  • citation management and impact tracking tools
  • data management and preservation
  • publishing, copyright, and Open Access issues
  • digital preservation and promotion

Our Friday workshops, both on site and online, provide more information.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Meet the Librarian: Diane Johnson, Assistant Director of Information Services and Resources, Health Sciences Library

Meet the Librarian: Diane Johnson, Assistant Director of Information Services and Resources, Health Sciences Library

Can you tell us a little about your background and experience and what led you to MU libraries?

I made up my mind to become a librarian when I was just a kid after seeing my hometown librarian, Anna Detjen, walk to a shelf, pull off a book, open it to a page, and say: “There’s the answer to your question.” How did she do that? How could I learn to do that? I wanted to be a public librarian – I didn’t even know medical libraries existed – but when I tried to set up an internship in college, none were available in public libraries. I was given the choice between an internship in a patient library in a hospital for the criminally insane or in a nursing school library, so I chose the latter. And once there, I found out about the Medical Subject Heading vocabulary, which is used for organizing medical journal articles and books. It made so much sense. I opted for medical librarianship and never looked back. 

I interviewed at MU back in 1980 when I was finishing library school at the University of Minnesota. It was a beautiful spring day, and I fell in love with Columbia and knew right away I wanted to come here.

 

What are some of the unique aspects of your job?

Here in the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, we spend a lot of time and effort trying to bring our services and collections to our users as part of their normal workflow. Some of us work with clinical teams, answering questions as they arise. In that context, we go beyond simply supplying bibliographies and reference lists to providing summary and synthesis of results.

I’ve also served as co-investigator on systematic reviews, a research method in which you search for, analyze and summarize all of the studies addressing a specific clinical question. I develop the searches and document the search strategies for the research protocol. Librarians are uniquely qualified for this role since it is our business to be familiar with the history, quirks and vagaries of different databases and search engines.


What are some of the ways technology has changed the way your library offers reference services?

Two recent exciting developments, proactive chat and co-browsing, have really helped us amp up our level of service. With proactive chat, if somebody sits on one of our webpages for more than a minute or two, a window pops up to ask them if they need any help. Another recent addition that people really seem to like is co-browsing. When somebody comes into the chat room and needs help doing a search, we can share our screen and talk them through each step in the search.  At the conclusion of one recent session, a user told me, "This may have been the most helpful customer service experience in my life."

It’s fun to look back at how far we’ve come. When I started in 1980, our library had two computers, which communicated over phone lines to the National Library of Medicine and the OCLC Library Catalog service. With the latter, we couldn’t just search for a book title, we had to use coded search keys. And we couldn’t search for organization names until after 4 p.m. because it would overwhelm the computer.

Even though the tools have changed dramatically, our core service of helping people get answers to their questions is still much the same.

 

What types of renovation are needed in the Health Sciences Library in order to better serve your patrons?

It will come as no surprise to anyone who has visited the Health Sciences Library that much of our carpeting and many of our chairs are older than most of our students!

Since the medical and health professions curriculum focuses on small-group learning, we need collaborative spaces where our students can work together in small groups without disturbing those studying around them.

I would like to have white noise machines installed so that people on the third floor can’t hear conversations from two floors below, and vice versa. We’ve had heating and cooling issues in this building ever since it opened, and it’s my fervent hope that we can address these issues in the renovations. 

I also think a renovation of the Health Sciences Library would provide an opportunity to retrofit an aging building to make it more energy-efficient. Library buildings much older than ours have achieved LEED gold certification by installing energy-efficient lighting, heating, cooling and plumbing and by choosing furnishings that make use of recycled content.

In this age of mobile computing, we are returning to an era when we can focus on designing spaces to meet the needs of people rather than machines. People will be bringing their increasingly portable computers with them, so we don’t need to have as many computer desks. Instead, we can focus on an inviting mixture of desks for individual study, small-group study areas, and soft seating where people can put their feet up.

 

home Cycle of Success Meet the Librarian: Corrie Hutchinson, Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development

Meet the Librarian: Corrie Hutchinson, Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development

Tell us a little about your background and experience?

I have been a professional librarian for almost 14 years and have worked only in academic libraries. Over the years, I have served in a variety of positions throughout the library including reference, technical services, and administration.I think this variation helps to give me a broad perspective and see how all the pieces of a library fit together. I think that knowing what others do helps me to be a better manager, understand the bigger picture, and find solutions to problems easier.

My bachelor’s degree is in mathematics along with a masters in library science and one in statistics.This foundation built in logic and problem solving has helped me immensely in the library profession, particularly in my current position as Acquisitions Librarian.

Your last position was as the director of the Stephens College library. What has been the biggest difference between working at Stephens College and working at MU?

I think the biggest difference is moving from a staff of 8 to a staff of 150 in the library.The interconnectedness and number of people involved in all the services and functions of library has taken some time to figure out. But now that I’ve been on the job for over year, I have a much better understanding of the workings of MU Library. I am better acquainted with all the division of duties, but I am still learning new things every day.

What do you love about your job?
I enjoy helping patrons gain access to information in a way that utilizes my strengths. Not many librarians like invoices or statistics. I like that my skills can help me to complement my colleagues and work towards creating a complete educational environment for others. I also like that my job challenges me and forces me to learn new things. 

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library MU Libraries Participates in Women’s and Children’s Hospital Reverse Trick-or-Treat

MU Libraries Participates in Women’s and Children’s Hospital Reverse Trick-or-Treat

For the past few years, the Women's and Children's Hospital has organized reverse trick-or-treating. MU employees are invited to hand out treats to pediatric patients, siblings, and children of adult patients. This year, one of our medical librarians, Taira Meadowcroft, asked for volunteers to go with her this Halloween to participate.

This fantastic group put together halloween bags filled with stickers, pencils, instruments, play-doh, and many other goodies. In all their Halloween glory, they loaded up several boxes, and headed to the hospital. Once there, they were greeted by superheros, princesses, football players, and tinkerbells, all waiting to trick-or-treat. By the end, there was no goodie bags left!

Thanks to all who volunteered to be apart of the 200 MU and MU health staff who handed out treats. Be sure to take a peek at the MU Health instagram and story https://www.instagram.com/muhealth/

reverse-trick-or-treat-instagram

 

Our volunteers included: Grace Atkins, Cindi Cotner- Halloween , Stara Herron- Jack Skellington , Taira Meadowcroft- Netlflix, Kimberly Moeller- Ninja, Paula Roper, Caryn Scoville, Deb Ward- Wizard , Rhonda Whithaus

 

Follow Mizzou.Libraries on instagram!

happy-halloween

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Meet the Librarian: Federico Martinez-Garcia, Head, Access Services

Meet the Librarian: Federico Martinez-Garcia, Head, Access Services

What led you to MU Libraries?

I was born in Sonora, Mexico in a small border town next to Arizona’s southwest corner. I have lived in desert, arid areas all of my life (Sonora, Arizona and Nevada), and I wanted to experience something different. This idea started after having the opportunity to study abroad in Paris and noticing how great it was to live in a place with green vegetation and rain. 

After receiving my Masters in Library and Information Sciences, my priority was to relocate to an area with four seasons. During my job search, I found that the University of Missouri Libraries were hiring.  Besides having the four seasons, I found out the percentage of international students and population in general, especially Hispanics, was almost not existent compared to the Southwest.  So, it got me more excited to join an institution where I can offer assistance to increase a more diverse university population and probably even to the population in general.

Describe some of the changes that are going on in access services in Ellis Library and at libraries everywhere?

Access Services is a department that is currently reevaluating many of its services to satisfy the current and future needs of all library users.  Some changes that are already taking place include the increase of renewals for faculty, graduate students, and staff from two to five, allowing them to possibly keep traditional checked out MU Library materials for up to four months; and extending our interlibrary loan services to visiting scholars.  We are also working on taking the library check out system from due date stamps to print receipts; self-checkout machines to avoid waiting in line; and searching for the best ways to advertise services and equipment that can be checked out from the library.

I foresee in the future of Access Services the increase of staff base knowledge in the means of cross-training to minimize the number of referrals.  This has been taking place in academic, public and private libraries in the world, which has increased the satisfaction level in all library users. I also envision advances in technology to reach all university affiliates, close and far away.

 What vision do you bring to your position?

My vision is to create a collaborative working environment among the different library departments as well as university departments with the sole purpose of facilitating access to information to all library users. Just like the MU Libraries and University Administration, I am pro-inclusion. I believe that the key to success is to work together to create a stronger institution.  I always welcome faculty, staff and student’s feedback to identify what must get done to satisfy everyone’s needs.

Promoting Open Access Research @ MU

Open Access week is an important week. A week dedicated to highlighting the importance of Open Access and advocating for free, and immediate online access to scholarly research. This year’s theme, “Open in Action,” is all about taking concrete steps to open up research and scholarship and encouraging others to do the same. This was the purpose in creating an open access blog; a way to share research MU faculty choose to publish open access.

Every few weeks, I post about an open access article, right here on our library news page. When typing up the post, I focus on the research itself, the academic accomplishments of the faculty, and the most important, the reasons why they chose to publish in open access. I've received several insightul thoughts on why they think open access is important, and to my great delight, all look fantastic as graphics. 😉 Marketing material aside, they are profound thoughts that I hope will strike a chord with other MU faculty, and scholars outside the university, further engaging others and promoting the open access initiative. 

 

copy-of-would-you-publish-open-access-again-1why-open-access-social-media-3

 

October 22nd-October 24th, I presented a poster at Merge&Converge'16, the 2016 Mid-Continent Medical Library Association conference. I wanted to show others that promoting open access, and engaging faculty is easier than we think. Faculty can be open access champions.

 

tairamcmlaposter2016

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books The Lucubrator and the Young Ladies Academy of Philadelphia

The Lucubrator and the Young Ladies Academy of Philadelphia

This post is the eighth and final part of our continuing series on Dr. Juliette Paul's English 4300 class and their research on an early American manuscript in Special Collections.

By an Anonymous English Major, Recently Graduated

While researching the origins of a mysterious manuscript that was donated to Ellis Library many years ago, our Early American Literature class learned not only about who might have written the book, when, and why, we also learned a great deal about what life was like in the time period in which it was written. The Lucubrator is a commonplace book, written in late eighteenth-century America. It includes many essays, one of which, “On Female Education,” helps to reveal how eighteenth-century readers felt about the roles of women in society.

The author of the essay begins by recalling the recent opening of a local school for women: “The admittance of females into the Academy in the United States, is an eminent instance, of their refined cultivation and advancement in literature.” The academy to which the author refers is likely the Young Ladies Academy of Philadelphia. The opening of this particular academy would have been deeply significant to many Americans, as it was, according to Marion B. Savin and Harold J. Abrahams, “the first chartered institution for the higher education of young women in the United States and perhaps in the world” (59). The Academy was established on June 4, 1782, by John Poor, and, five years later, on January 9, 1792, it was granted a charter by the laws of Pennsylvania. By that time, one hundred women were in attendance. They studied the expected subjects, such as reading, writing, math, and history. They also studied singing, piano, and astronomy.

It was considered a prestigious accomplishment to graduate from the Academy, though often completion meant women might be better wives and mothers, rather than opening doors for careers. In James A. Neal’s An Essay on the Education and Genius of the Female Sex (1795), he writes, “When admitted to an equal participation of the illuminating beams of science, we observe women rising to the most conspicuous and enviable state of eminence” (2). Neal published his Essay on Education with his account of the Academy’s commencement activities held on December 18, 1794. Neal’s praise for the Academy shows his faith in women’s intellectual capabilities, but his was not the prevailing opinion of the time. Indeed, when Benjamin Rush delivered an address to the Academy on July 28, 1787, he made glowing remarks on female learning, but only because he believed that receiving a liberal education would make a girl “an agreeable companion to a sensible man” (79).

Domestic life was quite important in the eighteenth century and women often played an important role in making domestic life run properly. The essay “On Female Education” seems to convey this idea. Its author writes of women: “If they are never to fill a public seat or harangue in public, will they never have an occasion to read in a company of friends, or, to teach what they have leart [sic] to their families and children?” While researching this essay in the The Lucubrator, we learned that when it was written, America was beginning to come around to the idea that women deserve an education in order to become happier, more productive people.

People, most often, will be as great as they are allowed to be. When we continue to treat women as inferior, less intelligent people, it makes it hard for them to prove otherwise. Many are not given the chance to better themselves, and when they are, their accomplishments are overlooked by people who only seem to pay attention to what they want to see. While there is still a long way to go before people who are not white men are treated with equal amounts of respect, education continues to be the best route to achieving this.


Works Cited

Rush, Benjamin. Essays, Literary, Moral & Philosophical (Philadelphia, 1798).

Savin, Marion B. and Harold J. Abrahams. “The Young Ladies’ Academy of Philadelphia.” History of Education Journal. Vol. 8. No. 2 (Winter, 1957): 68-67.

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Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Cycle of Success, Journalism Library 14 graduate students receive scholarships to attend digital news preservation event at UCLA

14 graduate students receive scholarships to attend digital news preservation event at UCLA

Fourteen graduate students from academic institutions across the U.S. have been selected to receive funding assistance to attend a conference next month where they will take active steps toward preserving digital news.

Each student has received a travel scholarship to help cover expenses to attend the Dodging the Memory Hole: Saving Online News forum Oct. 13 and 14 at UCLA. Students will work side by side with journalists, technologists, librarians and other stakeholders to craft a national agenda for preserving born-digital journalism — content created on a computer or digital sensor.

The forum is an initiative of the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute’s Journalism Digital News Archive with funding from RJI and an Institute of Museum and Library Services Award. Additional support is being provided by UCLA Library, University of Missouri Libraries and the Educopia Institute.

It’s important to make future journalists, archivists and technologists part of the solution now, says Edward McCain, digital curator of journalism at RJI and University of Missouri Libraries.

“It is critical we begin building awareness of the need to preserve born-digital news content today so that future generations will not suffer the looming ‘memory hole’ of lost journalistic reportage,” says McCain. “I’m delighted to have such talented individuals joining us as we work together to save online news.”

Attendees will hear from speakers from organizations including The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and the Library of Congress. Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent Peter Arnett will be a special guest speaker.

The scholarships are being funded by a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant from IMLS. The funding assistance was available to graduate students in the U.S. studying library/information science, journalism, computer science and other related fields.

As part of being selected to receive a scholarship, each student has been asked to propose and complete a project that supports one of the conference goals. They will also pitch their project ideas to the assembly during the forum.

Meet the scholarship recipients

Chris AllmanChris Allman of Charlotte, North Carolina, studies library and information science at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He wants to learn more about how the local news startup Charlotte Agenda is preserving its born-digital news content, and develop additional guidelines for how Charlotte Agenda staff can improve those efforts.

John BerlinJohn Berlin of Suffolk, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, where he works for the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group. His project goal is to improve the Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL) software system by adding a feature to enable users to specify criteria to track news or other content from media platforms such as Twitter. Once identified, this content could then be archived automatically.

Terry BrittTerry Britt of Sweetwater, Tennessee, is a doctoral candidate studying journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. He will write a research paper on the significance of efforts to assure the lifespan and accessibility of local online news content.

Itza CarbajalItza Carbajal of New Orleans, Louisiana, is an information studies scholar at the University of Texas in Austin. She plans to conduct a research project that lists tools such as ArchiveReady.com that measure the ability for a website to be archived properly. She then plans to assess the web archiving readiness of a variety of online news providers.

Jiwon ChoiJiwon Choi of Osan, South Korea, is studying convergence journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She plans to meet with international students from the University of Missouri to explore how to protect online media content and develop  possible solutions.   

Alison GuilloryAlison Guillory of Belmont, Massachusetts, is a library and information science scholar at Wayne State University in Detroit. She wants to determine which technologies have successfully protected content from the memory hole and which haven’t by studying how news saved in a digital format have fared over a 20-year period. She plans to document what she learns in a timeline. 

Matt HellmanMatt Hellman of Austin, Texas, is a journalism student at the University of Missouri in Columbia. His project involves a case study of how the Columbia Missourian photography staff is using open source software to provide access to and create a cloud-based long-term archive for digital content.

Shawn JonesShawn Jones of Virginia Beach, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project will explore the potential relationship between social media sharing of news articles and how quickly those articles are identified by web crawlers as candidates for archiving.

Mat KellyMat Kelly of LaBelle, Florida, is a doctoral candidate studying computer science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project addresses the need to provide individuals with ways to collect, archive and access news content they perceive as important. Kelly’s work is intended to supplement the large-scale collection work being done by institutions such as the Internet Archive and Library of Congress.

Eva ReaverEva Revear of Puyallup, Washington, studies journalism at New York University in New York. Her goal is to find a way to preserve data-driven news applications such as ProPublica’s Dollars for Docs. She is currently conducting a survey to collect data about news apps so she can devise ways to organize news app archiving systems. Her findings will be published as an academic paper.

Hanna SoltysHanna Soltys of St. Louis studies library and information science at Simmons College in Boston. Her project examines questions surrounding how to create more complete preservation methods that accommodate the complexity of digital news platforms. She will also investigate why current archival practices are struggling to preserve online news content.

Carolina VargasCarolina Vargas of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She wants to reach journalism students with messages that increase awareness of the problem of born-digital content loss and provide options for solving this problem.

Tamar WilnerTamar Wilner of Dallas studies journalism through the University of Missouri’s online journalism master’s program. She seeks to address problems associated with inaccurate and outdated news content by exploring technology that supports online correction methods.

Elizabeth ZirkElizabeth Zirk, of Palatine, Illinois, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She will help author and edit a white paper about the forum outcomes. This will include gathering details about the proposed national agenda for preserving born-digital news, projects proposed by working groups and reports summarizing panels and presentations from the event.

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books When Authors Go Missing: Putting Manuscripts into Perspective, by Tyler Morris

When Authors Go Missing: Putting Manuscripts into Perspective, by Tyler Morris

This post is the seventh part of our continuing series on Dr. Juliette Paul's English 4300 class and their research on an early American manuscript in Special Collections.

by Tyler Morris

After weeks of working to decode The Lucubrator, I can’t help but feel I’m left with more questions than answers. The title page offered our class a name: James Noyes. But we quickly realized that the manuscript’s authorship is more of a mystery than any of us originally thought. Simply searching for “James Noyes” in databases and Google was not going to cut it. So I altered my approach. I looked to find “Lucubrator” essays written by other authors who could potentially eliminate James Noyes as a candidate for the authorship of some or all of The Lucubrator’s essays.  

Though I found a few published essays written by “The Lucubrator,” none matched those bound in the manuscript. We concluded that we could not attribute the manuscript to Noyes definitely nor question the attribution made on the title page. Eventually, I posed a different question: what good is a book that no longer has a known author or place of origin?

When considering my answer, it dawned on me that I had learned more from the manuscript than I originally thought, even without knowing its author. The fact that we could not find a printed version of a Lucubrator essay suggests either that someone should have done a better job of bookkeeping or that the manuscript may not have been meant for the public. But, then again, I think my speculation that the manuscript’s essays were at one time printed to entertain and inform readers is a compelling one, for several reasons.

Some of the essays are not dated in chronological order and others are given two dates, which may signify the dates on which they were printed elsewhere. Moreover, the essays are morally edifying. My favorite essay is one entitled “On Friendship.” After overcoming the difficulty of having to read literature in the original handwriting, you find that the author of The Lucubrator actually offers a rather beautiful description of true friendship. Phrases like “Friendship, when it is sincere, is acknowledged by all to be a very fruitful source of happiness,” or “When there is a dissimilarity of opinions or pursuits, there seldom exist any great degree of friendship; for that difference is apt to create disputes between each other, and people in general are too much attached to their own ways of thinking to respect another of different or opposite sentiments,” offer some insight and advice that is still very useful today. The same goes for the essays that offer criticism, such as “Propriety of Behaving with Moderation In Parties,” which is pretty much self-explanatory, and “On the Propriety of Taxing Ministers of the Gospels for the Support of Government.”

Likewise, learning about the life of the best candidate for the manuscript’s authorship, James Noyes of Atkinson (1778-1799), was inspirational. Interestingly enough, Noyes was around the same age as me and my classmates when The Lucubrator was written, which made me feel like I needed to step my game up as far as everything is concerned! Noyes was a prodigy responsible for publishing a Federal Arithmetic for Congress, as well as a number of almanacs and even an astronomical diary, which are profound achievements for anyone, but especially for an author so young. A few years later, Noyes died of polio, after being forced to use crutches. Issues with immobility left him stuck in his house for most of his final days.

I think that integrating short essays like the Lucubrator essays with applications such as Twitter and Facebook would be an excellent way to entertain my generation, as well as a tool for teaching life lessons. The idea and form of The Lucubrator are what we can take away from our research experience and what we can call the manuscript’s history and purpose, even if the author conceived of it differently.

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Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

Lucubration and Inspiration

This post is part 6 of our continuing series on Dr. Juliette Paul's English 4300 class and their research on an early American manuscript in Special Collections.

by Jon Crecelius

Though we don’t have the technology to travel back to the past, we can still piece together clues that give us a glimpse of what the past was like. In conducting research on The Lucubrator, I did exactly that. My interests leaned towards the intellectual and literary cultures of post-revolutionary America, and how they might have influenced the mysterious author of the manuscript, called James Noyes on the title page.

Some of the most notable writers of eighteenth-century America were none other than the “Founding Fathers.” Men such as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and James Madison, with their works entitled Notes on the State of Virginia (1785), Poor Richard’s Almanack (1732-58), and The Federalist Papers (1787-88), all wrote well known publications that would have shaped the literary and social culture of the manuscript author’s time. But these men were not the only authors writing important pieces in and about early America. One important, but overlooked, author is J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur (1735-1813), an influential French immigrant farmer who lived in New York.

Post 7_Letters from American Farmer title page

The writings of Crèvecoeur espouse the type of freethinking, industriousness, and morally minded spirit so often dictated by The Lucubrator’s author. In his famous essay, “What is an American?,” Crèvecoeur asserts “We are all animated with the spirit of industry which is unfettered and unrestrained because each person works for himself” (2). This portrait of Americans, driven by a strong work ethic, is found also in Jefferson’s writings and may be compared to the industrious writer we meet in The Lucubrator. More significant, however, is that all three writers—Crèvecoeur, Jefferson, and the author of the manuscript—express admiration for the American farmer and the pastoral joys of agricultural life that many believed came with it. In one passage of his Notes, Jefferson writes “Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. It is the focus in which he keeps alive that sacred fire, which otherwise might escape from the face of the earth” (179). Likewise, the author of The Lucubrator writes in an essay entitled “On Agriculture”: “If gentleman in the highest walks of society possessed a taste for the amusement of gardening, the cultivation of fruit trees, and other branches of agriculture, it would perhaps contribute as much to health and innocence, as to national independence and prosperity.”

If James Noyes of Atkinson is the author of The Lucubrator, he seems to have been a man of high ideals and strong morals. In my opinion, though he makes himself out to be an important thinker, Noyes is mostly distilling the ideas of writers who came before him. However, this does not make his work unimportant. It is still, despite its enigmatic character, an important discovery that adds to our knowledge of the early American landscape; and, because this work is one that has been previously unstudied, it shows us how those people forgotten by history thought and lived.


Works Cited

St. John, James Hector. "What Is an American?" Letters From an American Farmer. 1782. 

National Humanities Center. Web. 15 Apr. 2016.

Jefferson, Thomas. Notes on the State of Virginia. The Federalist Papers Project. Web. 16 Apr. 2016.

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Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli