home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel, Staff news MLK Teach-In Exhibit at Ellis Library

MLK Teach-In Exhibit at Ellis Library

In support of the MLK Teach-In this month, University Libraries has created an exhibit on Confederate Rock. Confederate Rock was a monument erected by the John S. Marmaduke Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1935. The monument originally stood in the area we know today as Speakers Circle. In 1974, Mizzou activists led by the Legion of Black Collegians succeeded in having the monument removed from the MU campus. The monument has had many homes in Boone County, eventually being placed at the Centralia Battlefield Historical Site in 2015. This exhibit contains several newspaper articles and photographs that highlight the history of the monument.

Explore this topic with us at Ellis Library. The theme of this year’s MLK Teach-In is “Where Do We Go From Here?”  The exhibit will be on display through Friday, March 29th. Interact with us at libraryguides.missouri.edu/mlk

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Hidden Gems @ the Library: The Architectural Review

Hidden Gems @ the Library: The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review is “a curated selection of the best architectural ideas in the world to inspire your mind and feed your soul,” as described on their website.  This magazine is a monthly international architectural magazine, which has been published in London since 1896.  It features a collection of significant buildings from around the world, accompanied by critiques, photography, drawings, and technical details.  The Architectural Review also includes commentary that focuses on the history of the buildings, the social impact, and the reasons why certain choices were made.

MU Ellis Library has been collecting the magazine since 1896.  Online access is available for issues after 5/1/1993 and can be accessed here: https://bit.ly/2UIkIWp.  Paper copies are available from 1896-present.  To view the records, please click here: http://merlin.lib.umsystem.edu/record=b1878198.

The December 2018/January 2019 naturally caught our eye because it is the library issue, which features books and buildings, “with pieces exploring the architecture and influence of books as well as libraries and archives from across the world, including the winner of the AR Library awards.”

Their digital content is updated daily and can be viewed at https://www.architectural-review.com/.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services Digital Media Lab Open House, March 19

Digital Media Lab Open House, March 19

Mizzou students!  You are invited to the Digital Media Lab’s Open House on March 19th from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm in Ellis Library rooms 156 and 153.  We’d like to introduce you to all the fun resources available in the DML.  During this time, you will get the chance to view 360 videos with VR goggles, perform 3d scans of objects or yourself and take pictures in front of a green screen with your choice of background. Stop for a few minutes just to look around, or stay longer for a hands-on experience!

home Ellis Library, Workshops Open Ed Week event for faculty – $250 stipend

Open Ed Week event for faculty – $250 stipend

Are you an instructor who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on your students?

Explore possible open textbook solutions by attending the Open Textbook Library Review Workshop — a one-hour, in-person session where you can discover open textbooks in your field. After the workshop, you’ll be asked to write an optional short review of an open textbook from the Open Textbook Library. Qualified faculty instructors who go on to write a review are eligible for a $250.*

Date: Friday, March 8 from noon-1pm
Location: Ellis Library classroom 213

REGISTRATION

More information:

  • For more information about OER on our campus, visit oer.missouri.edu
  • For more information about the UM System’s Affordable & Open Educational Resources faculty grant program, visit umsystem.edu/ums/aa/oer

*Not sure if you’re eligible for the $250 stipend? Please contact Grace Atkins, the Open Educational and Outreach Librarian at atkinsge@missouri.edu

TAGS:

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Workshops MU Open Education Week 2019 Activities and Events

MU Open Education Week 2019 Activities and Events

Celebrate Open Education Week 2019 (March 4-8) by learning more about how you can support Open Education!

Open Education Week is an international celebration of the global Open Education Movement. Its goal is to raise awareness about the movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide.

Check out these Open Education Week activities and events at Mizzou!

Instructor OER Survey 2019

Online Survey – approximately 10 minutes
SURVEY

Open to MU faculty and graduate instructors. Please take this anonymous survey to help The UM System’s Affordable & Open Educational Resources (A&OER) learn more about instructor approaches and practices for the selection of teaching materials. The data received from this survey will be used to formulate new strategies for supporting teaching and learning at the University of Missouri. Survey is open until March 31, 2019.

Survey URL: https://missouri.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0lnuNvcUuysg6G1

Contact: oer@missouri.edu

OER Commons: Where Do I Start?

Online Webinar
Wednesday, March 6, 2019 at 12:00pm Central (noon)
REGISTER

Are you a faculty member who wants to learn how to find and share OER content? Are you a librarian who wants to learn more about how to create tailored OER collections for your campus? Do you want to know how to help instructors showcase the open course materials they are creating? Are you just really exited about Open Education Week? Then this webinar is for you!

Join MOBIUS OER System Leaders, Grace Atkins and Christina Virden to learn more about how to get the most out of this new resource available to member institutions. We will cover how to create collections on the hub, use OER Commons authoring tools, and implement strategies for collecting OER already existing on your campus.

Registration URL: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6536469480293590027

Contact: Christina Virden, christina@mobiusconsortium.org

Open Textbook Library Review Workshops for Faculty

In-Person Workshop
Ellis Library classroom 213
Two opportunities to attend!

  • Tuesday, March 5 at 4pm
  • Friday, March 8 at noon

REGISTER

Are you an instructor who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on your students? Explore possible open textbook solutions by attending the Open Textbook Library Review Workshop — a one-hour session where you can discover open textbooks in your field. Attendees who go on to write a review for the Open Textbook Library qualify for a $250 stipend. Please only attend one workshop.

Registration URL: http://library.missouri.edu/news/ellis-library/open-textbook-library-review-workshop-for-faculty

Contact: Grace Atkins, atkinsge@missouri.edu

 

OER REMINDERS

AOER Grant Proposals Due March 8, 2019

AOER Grant Proposals Due March 8, 2019

Reminder: Affordable and Open Educational Resources grant proposals are due on March 8.

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OER.MISSOURI.EDU

oer.missouri.edu

Interested in finding or creating OER? Just curious to learn more about OER?

Check out oer.missouri.edu or email oer@missouri.edu

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home Ellis Library, Workshops Open Textbook Library Review Workshop for Faculty

Open Textbook Library Review Workshop for Faculty

Are you an instructor who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on your students?

Explore possible open textbook solutions by attending the Open Textbook Library Review Workshop — a one-hour, in-person session where you can discover open textbooks in your field. After the workshop, you’ll be asked to write an optional short review of an open textbook from the Open Textbook Library. Qualified faculty instructors who go on to write a review are eligible for a $250.*

Dates: Tuesday, March 5 at 4pm & Friday, March 8 at noon
Location: Ellis Library classroom 213

REGISTRATION
There are 2 opportunities to attend. Please only attend one workshop:

More information:

  • For more information about OER on our campus, visit oer.missouri.edu
  • For more information about the UM System’s Affordable & Open Educational Resources faculty grant program, visit umsystem.edu/ums/aa/oer

*Not sure if you’re eligible for the $250 stipend? Please contact Grace Atkins, the Open Educational and Outreach Librarian at atkinsge@missouri.edu.

TAGS:

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted high school juniors from around the state to the University of Missouri Campus. “With a carefully selected faculty and staff, a specially designed curriculum that focuses on the liberal arts, and a variety of stimulating extracurricular activities, the academy enables students to be part of a unique learning community.” One of those stops for the academy is the library.

Last year, the students visited with Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, who assisted the students with finding primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. The collaboration was so successful that, Ben Balzer, one of the Missouri Scholars instructors, jumped at the chance for his science fiction students to attend Rachel’s research workshop during the 2018 session as well as expanding that collaboration to include Kelli Hansen, Special Collections Librarian.

Rachel Brekhus

“Their work with my students was, in short, amazing! I extended my collaboration to Kelli because of how much last year’s students enjoyed working with library resources,” says Ben. Both his science fiction and censorship in literature classes met with Kelli, who provided literary texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries for the scholars to examine. The scholars looked at items ranging from a comic version of 2001, A Space Odyssey to a rare copy of Utopia by Thomas More. Ben found this opportunity provided his students the ability “to see the rich artistic tradition that underpins the literature we read today.” The scholars left their visit to Special Collections inspired and excited to work on their research projects.

Ben sees this collaboration being a regular component of his classes. “I want high school students to gain familiarity with university resources so they will feel prepared to make good use of academic libraries when they arrive on college campuses. Students of literature should also be introduced to the social, political, ethical, and historical significance of the texts they read. Working with research librarians helps students better recognize these broader contexts and how they enrich literary study,” says Ben.

Kelli Hansen
Kelli Hansen

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Exodus: Images of Black Migration in Missouri and Beyond, 1866-1940

Presentation on the images and other items in the Black History Month display in Ellis Library on Black Migration in Missouri. Contact: Joan Stack (stackj@ shsmo.org) and Paula Roper (roperp@ missour.edu) Sponsors: State Historical Society and Black History Month Committee

February 4, 2019
4 p.m.
114A Ellis Library

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

This is a guest post written by Dr. Jessie Adolph, an instructor of English at Lincoln University.

oracle | ˈôrək(ə)l | noun a priest or priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity. • a place at which divine advice or prophecy was sought. • a person or thing regarded as an infallible authority or guide on something: casting the attorney general as the oracle for and guardian of the public interest is simply impossiblearchaic a response or message given by an oracle, typically one that is ambiguous or obscure.

Dr. Paula Roper, who I affectionately call “The Oracle” served a crucial role in my development as an educator and a scholar.  During our collaborations on subject topics for English 1000, she transformed the library from a center of archaic readings into a vibrant prophetic learning experience.  She introduced my students to peer-reviewed sources and resource methods making my lessons on historical trauma, spoken-word poetry, and hip-hop culture relative to the lives of my students.  Explicitly, she instructed my students about African and Global Studies traditions influencing popular culture in America.  The undergraduates learned “Nommo,” the power of the word (an Akan word meaning “To Make One Drink), can be utilized as a form of resistance and/or healing to build community. In other words, the young scholars learned they had a voice which can create the sound of power to change their reality.  This in mind, she inspired me as an academic to utilize my voice for change.

Dr. Paula Roper, the Oracle, and Mizzou library helped me to earn my Ph.D. in Africana Diaspora Studies.  My dissertation entitled “Dee-Jay Drop that Deadbeat;” Hip-hop’s Remix of Fatherhood Narratives” an interdisciplinary project required a substantial amount of research.  Specifically, I examined hip-hop fatherhood narratives that constructed imagery of African American fathers and Black identity formation.  Dr. Roper proved instrumental to the project by assisting me to compile an eclectic reading list African diasporic, history, sociology, and psychological to complete my task.  She helped me to maximize my time at the library—I could not have become Dr. Adolph without her expert-tutelage.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Citation Management Workshops

Collect, organize, and format your citations with EndNote, Zotero and Mendeley! Register today at https://library.missouri.edu/workshops

EndNote:

Friday, February 1, 1-2 p.m.

Tuesday, February 12, 3-4 p.m.

Thursday, February 28, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Mendeley:

Tuesday, January 29, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Tuesday, February 19, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Friday, March 8, 1-2 p.m.

Zotero:

Thursday, January 31, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Thursday, February 14, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Thursday, April 4, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

All sessions held in Ellis Library 213.

Need a different date or time? Groups of five or more can request additional sessions of these workshops at https://library.missouri.edu/workshops