home Ellis Library, Workshops U Publish @ Your Library: How to Publish Your Research

U Publish @ Your Library: How to Publish Your Research

Date:  October 3, 2019
Time:  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Place:  114A Ellis Library

Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop

Join us for a presentation and panel discussion on scholarly publishing, moderated by Daniel Ascher, from the academic publisher Springer Nature.

Panelists:

  • Jung Ha-Brookshire
    Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, College of Human Environmental Sciences
    Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Textile and Apparel Management
    Book author: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry
    Editorial board member: Fashion & Textiles
  • Harvey S. James, Jr.
    Professor, Associate Division Director & Director of Graduate Studies, Division of Applied Social Sciences
    Editor-in-Chief, Agriculture and Human Values
    Book editor:  Ethical Tensions from New Technology: The Case of Agricultural Biotechnology
  • Shibu Jose
    Professor, Interim Associate Dean for Research, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources &
    interim Director, MO Agricultural Experiment Station
    Editor-in-Chief, Agroforestry Systems
    Book editor: Biomass and Biofuels: Advanced Biorefineries for Sustainable Production and Distribution

Topics include:

  • Journal selection
  • Submission process
  • Working with editors
  • Collaborating with authors from different institutions
  • Open access publishing

Refreshments will be provided.

Sponsored by 

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Rare Materials Essential to Understanding History

Rare Materials Essential to Understanding History

Colton Ochsner, a history doctoral student at MU, does research on the origins of fantasy and science fiction films in modern German history. Colton chose the German cinema as his concentration because German films have become very influential. “They made a lot of movies that have spread across the world and influenced film, especially to America. Anything from Blade Runner to Star Wars has been inspired in some way by a lot of these older movies, especially visually. I have been drawn to these older movies in particular because I have known about the occult and I have seen it working in these movies and yet no scholar has pointed it out,” he said.

Knowing how specialized his research could be, Colton sought the help of Ellis librarians. “My research wouldn’t be possible without the librarians help because the books and movies from this era require Interlibrary Loan (ILL) to access them,” Colton said.

“The research Colton is doing on film and esoteric groups in Germany in the 1920s requires materials that are pretty sparse and many have not survived World War II and post-war disruptions,” said Anne Barker, humanities librarian. Anne is also fluent in German and how German libraries are structured, which makes it easier to fulfill Colton’s research requests. Anne helped Colton with deciphering references as he was trying to locate books and articles often with incomplete information. Anne said, “We’re so used to finding things online, it’s easy to forget that many things have not yet been digitized or indexed well.”

Since 2013, the ILL department processed more than 1,200 ILL requests for Colton. Oi-Chi (Ivy) Hui, head of ILL borrowing, works with Colton to fulfill the obscure requests. “It’s teamwork,” Ivy said. She has requested materials for Colton from Germany, France, Switzerland, Canada and throughout the United States. “Since these requests were not processed through the system, tracking correspondence manually and signing papers for copyright compliance is a challenge. Some of these materials took months before they got here,” Ivy said.

“The basic related teachings of the occult during this time-period that includes writings and images are important because in Germany people associated images, ideas and emotions with films,” Colton said. The research materials gave Colton the confirmation he needed. During his research, Colton found a poster from a 1919 film. While looking at the poster, he discovered the name of a book he had never heard. It turns out only two libraries in the world had the book. “It was a piece of pulp fiction literature from 1919. It was only published because it was going to be used to make an action and adventure movie,” he stated. Ivy was able to find the obscure book with the minimal information available and successfully filled the request.

With Anne and Ivy’s help, Colton continues to work on his research with a projected graduation date of 2023.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Article written by Christina Mascarenas

 

 

home Ellis Library, Workshops Upcoming Workshops @ Your Library

Upcoming Workshops @ Your Library

For a complete schedule of workshops, visit library.missouri.edu/workshops.

Getting Started with EndNote
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Tuesday, September 24
11 a.m.–Noon

Publishing an Academic Book: What Authors Need to Know
Location: 114A Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop
Tuesday, September 24
3:30–4:30 p.m.

Getting Started with Mendeley
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Wednesday, September 25
3:15–4:15 p.m.

Getting Started with Zotero
Location: 213 Health Sciences Library
Register for in-person workshop
Thursday, September 26
3:15–4:15 p.m.

Getting Started with Zotero
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Friday, September 27
1–2 p.m.

 

Need a different date or time? Groups of five or more can request additional sessions of these workshops at:
library.missouri.edu/workshops
Workshop recordings at:
libraryguides.missouri.edu/recordingsandtutorials

home Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Companies Get Rich Off Of University Research

Companies Get Rich Off Of University Research

Scholarly publishing is big business

“The industry built to publish and disseminate scientific articles — companies such as Elsevier and Springer Nature — has managed to become incredibly profitable by getting a lot of taxpayer-funded, highly skilled labor for free and affixing a premium price tag to its goods.” (1)

In order for universities to access this research, they are often required to purchase subscriptions with a hefty price tag. Universities worldwide spend millions per year so faculty can download and read their own work and that of their colleagues. Since these journals are behind university paywalls, the only option for members of the tax-paying public to gain access is for them to purchase individual articles. That can be pricey when articles may cost $20-$50 each.

Pay more, get less every year

How much money is at stake? Billions of dollars (2). Every year universities struggle to keep up with price increases to journal subscription packages that are far above annual inflation. Since subscription prices are rising much faster than library budgets, collections cuts are necessary.

Universities are fighting back

Many universities have established or are currently looking into establishing programs to assist in the transition of journals from the subscription model to open access. Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles coupled with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. Open access is the needed modern update for the communication of research that fully utilizes the Internet for what it was originally built to do—accelerate research. Accelerated research means increased return on investment, increased potential contributors, increased audience and collaborators, and increased access for the public. (3).

The University of Missouri System currently has the Open Access Publishing Task Force examining the rising costs of journal subscriptions and review the many open access opportunities available to the four campus system.

Read more about the impact these increases are having across the country.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Open Textbook Library Review Workshop for Faculty

Open Textbook Library Review Workshop for Faculty

Date: Friday, October 4, 2019
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Registration Required

Are you an instructor who is concerned about the impact of high textbook costs on your students? Explore possible open textbook solutions by attending the Open Textbook Library Review Workshop — a one-hour session where you can discover open textbooks in your field. After the workshop, you’ll be asked to write a short review of an open textbook from the Open Textbook Library Qualified faculty instructors who go on to write a review are eligible for a $250 stipend.

Not sure if you’re eligible for the $250 stipend? Please contact Joe Askins, Head of Instructional Services, at askinsj@missouri.edu.

home Ellis Library University of Missouri System Open Access Publishing Task Force

University of Missouri System Open Access Publishing Task Force

Since April 2019, the UM System Open Access Publishing Task Force has been hard at work examining the rising costs of journal subscriptions and reviewing the many open access opportunities available.

The system task force, representing all four universities, including faculty, librarians and vice chancellors of research and academic leadership, is chaired by Ann Campion Riley, Vice Provost for Libraries and University Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. Campion Riley is a nationally-recognized leader with nearly 30 years of professional service in academic and research libraries, serving as president of the Association of College and Research Libraries in 2015 and a research library leadership fellow by the Association of Research Libraries. Campion Riley brings key experience in open access publishing and scholarly communication to the task force.

University of Missouri System President Mun Choi tasked the group to “recommend potential strategies, actions and desired outcomes for the UM System to embark on a path to a more sustainable model of scholarly communication and library collection costs. Additionally, they will build faculty consensus to support open access publishing; develop systemwide guiding principles; support faculty in retaining copyrights and protecting author rights; identify alternative sources for access to scholarly publications; increase financial support for institutional repositories; and establish a data-driven process to inform decision-making.”

The task force will release a final recommendation report at the end of the month.

In addition to Campion Riley, members of the task force include:

  • James Birchler, Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences, MU
  • Michael Bruening, Associate Professor of History and IFC Rep., Missouri S&T
  • Brenda Dingley, Scholarly Communications Librarian, UMKC
  • Jun Fan, Cynthia Tang Missouri Distinguished Professor in Computer Engineering, Missouri S&T
  • Emily Goldstein, Assistant Director for the Center for Teaching and Learning and Instructional Designer, UMSL
  • Sherry Mahnken, Research Librarian, Missouri S&T
  • Ed Malone, Professor of English and Technical Communication, Missouri S&T
  • Gary Myers, Earl F. Nelson Professor of Law, MU
  • Tim Nelson, Collection, Development and Acquisitions Librarian, UMSL
  • John Spertus, MD, MPH, FACC and FAHA, UMKC
  • Jill Wood, Director, Academic Affairs, UM System
  • Xiaolan Yao, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences , UMKC
  • Bethany Zolman, Associate Professor in Biology and Director of the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Program, UMSL
TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Upcoming Workshop: Software Carpentry-Python

Upcoming Workshop: Software Carpentry-Python

University of Missouri Libraries is hosting a 2-day Software Carpentry Python workshop at 114A Ellis Library on October 7 and 8. This hands-on workshop will focus on basic concepts and skills to help researchers perform their work in less time and with less pain with Python code, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

Specific tools covered (no prior experience necessary) will be:

  • Unix shell
  • Git
  • Python

Pre-registration is required. Please visit https://libcal.missouri.edu/calendar/workshops/SWC-2019 for registration and information.

Presented with thanks to Research Computing Support Services and the Great Plains Network Carpentries Foundation Membership for sponsorship of this workshop.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Fall 2019 Group Study Room Reservations

Fall 2019 Group Study Room Reservations

We are excited to share that Ellis Library group study rooms will be renovated during Fall 2019. Rooms will receive some combination of new carpeting, paint, furnishings, white boards and technology. The Libraries are working closely with campus facilities to ensure the work is completed with the least amount of disruption possible. However, we may at times need to cancel a reservation or move groups to a new space. Please be aware when making a reservation that we will contact you as soon as we are aware of any possible disruption. We look forward to offering students improved group study spaces.

Thank you to the Student Technology Fee and the Student Fee Capital Improvement Fund for funding the renovations.

Reserve a Study Room

home Ellis Library, Workshops Upcoming Workshops @ Your Library

Upcoming Workshops @ Your Library

For a complete schedule of workshops, visit library.missouri.edu/workshops

Choosing a Citation Manager
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop
Tuesday, September 10
11 a.m.–Noon

Maximizing Your Research Identity and Impact
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop
Wednesday, September 11
3:15–4:15 p.m.

Welcome to the University Libraries: Services and Resources for the Savvy Researcher
Location: 114A Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop
Thursday, September 12
3:15–4:15 p.m.

Demystifying the Literature Review
Location: 213 Ellis Library
Register for in-person workshop
Register for online workshop
Friday, September 13
1–2 p.m.

Need a different date or time? Groups of five or more can request additional sessions of these workshops at:
library.missouri.edu/workshops
Workshop recordings at:
libraryguides.missouri.edu/recordingsandtutorials

home Ellis Library, Workshops U Publish Series: Publishing an Academic Book

U Publish Series: Publishing an Academic Book

Publishing an Academic Book: What Authors Need to Know

Tuesday, September 24, 3:30 – 4:30 pm
114A Ellis Library

Register here.

Do you plan to publish a book some day? Do you have questions about the book publishing process? David Rosenbaum, Director of the University of Missouri Press, Andrew Davidson, Editor in Chief, and Carli Conklin, Associate Professor and author of Pursuit of Happiness in the Founding Era: An Intellectual History (2019), will share information and advice on the book publishing process with new and aspiring authors. Attendees will learn how book publishers work with authors from first contact to putting a newly published work out into the world.

U Publish
Are you new to publishing your work? Do you have questions you need answered about the publishing process? This series provides University of Missouri authors with opportunities to hear from major academic publishers about their processes as well as learn from librarians and campus colleagues about important trends and issues related to academic publishing.

Sponsored by the University of Missouri Libraries