home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Institutional Support Models Could Revolutionize Open Access Publishing

Institutional Support Models Could Revolutionize Open Access Publishing

In addition to “producing grammatical descriptions and dictionaries for four varieties of the Luyia language cluster in western Kenya,” Michael Marlo is an Associate Professor of English and Linguistics and a member of the editorial board of the Language Science Press‘s Contemporary African Linguistics series. Language Science Press is an open access publisher of peer-reviewed linguistics books, including textbooks, and neither readers nor authors pay fees under the Knowledge Unlatched model, which instead relies on financial pledges from institutions and libraries to fund open access projects.

Michael’s editorship originally grew out of a desire to find a financially reasonable publishing outlet for the proceedings of the Annual Conference on African Linguistics. When researching potential publishers for book projects related to his National Science Foundation project, Structure and Tone in Luyia, he had also made note of their African Language Grammars and Dictionaries series.

“One of the major obstacles to the development of the field of linguistics is access to research results,” Michael says. For example, access to the digital version of the most prestigious publisher’s grammar series costs $10,000 plus annual fees for updates. A single book costs $200. Despite the prestige, Michael doesn’t intend to pursue publication through a press with such a prohibitive pricing model because that would limit his audience to those few whose libraries can afford access. He says, “While I recognize that there are still problems of access with publications that are primarily available as PDF downloads online, due to the fact that not everyone has internet access, having my work available for anyone to download is a major improvement in access over most other publishing options, which are either too expensive for readers or require a large subvention from the author, or both.”

Anne Barker

Last summer, Michael learned that Language Science Press was pursuing the institutional support funding model and asked Anne Barker, his subject librarian, if Mizzou Libraries could contribute. He was “thrilled” to learn that some funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities were able to be put toward the initiative. Michael says, “I believe [this model] has the chance to revolutionize publishing in my field, and possibly by extension many other fields in academia.”

Anne confirms, “Librarians have long been concerned that the commercialization of scholarly communication restricts access for individuals and strains library budgets. Changing the traditional publication funding model to provide for more open access is complex and challenging, but the Knowledge Unlatched model is promising. Mizzou Libraries is glad to be able to join this endeavor.”

Michael encourages students to use MOBIUS and Interlibrary Loan to access books outside of our collection. He also encourages students to find their subject areas in the stacks and look around. “There’s a lot of great stuff in there that you won’t easily find just by searching online databases!”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, September 21

Workshops @ Your Library, September 21

Introduction to Zotero

Bibliographies no longer have to be a frustrating component of your research paper. Zotero is a free and simple open-source research tool that can organize, manage and format your bibliography content. In our workshop, learn how to use Zotero to help create your bibliographies and in-text citations by extracting citations from PDFs and web pages.

Date: Friday, September 21, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

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home Ellis Library, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, September 14

Workshops @ Your Library, September 14

Introduction to Mendeley
Mendeley is a free reference manager that produces citations and bibliographies. It organizes your PDFs into a fully searchable database, allows you to annotate those PDFs, and share them with colleagues. Mendeley is also a social network, helping you discover researchers who share interests and see the papers that interest them.

Date: Friday, September 14, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

Complete List of Workshops @ Your Library

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Now hiring: graduate student needed for OER Facilitator position

Now hiring: graduate student needed for OER Facilitator position

Job Posting – MU Campus OER Facilitator

Title: MU Campus Open Educational Resources (OER) Facilitator

Description: Are you a graduate student pursuing strategic communication and/or fields related to higher education? Are you passionate about improving the affordability, accessibility, and equity of a college education?

The MU campus needs a dedicated PhD or Master’s student to facilitate communication, outreach, and assessment for OER projects.

In June 2017, the UM System launched an Affordable & Open Educational Resources initiative to lower the cost of textbooks by increasing the use of Open Educational Resources (OER). OER are free and openly licensed educational materials that can be used for teaching, learning, research, and other purposes. The initiative aims lower the cost of education and to make learning more assessable and equitable.

This year, to continue to grow the initiative, the UM System is partnering with OpenStax, a non-profit that creates OER and raises awareness about course material costs. Participating in this partnership is estimated to increase the use of OER at MU by 150%, which saves students millions of dollars. Many units on campus are working to assist OER efforts and the OpenStax partnership. However, additional support is required to make the most out of this partnership. The UM System has funded a part-time graduate student to coordinate communication, outreach, and assessment projects for MU campus OER projects.

Responsibilities:

  • Coordinate internal and external communication about campus OER usage and events
  • Plan and participate in OER awareness building messages, outreach, and events
  • Design infographics to communicate progress and marketing materials to raise OER awareness
  • Gather and organize MU campus OER and affordability data to submit to the UM System and OpenStax
  • Attend MU campus A&OER Operations Team meetings with the Mizzou Stores, Educational Technologies, the University Libraries, and the disabilities center.
  • Attend virtual meetings with the OpenStax institutional relations coordinator

Position goals and projects will be determined by the MU campus A&OER Operations Team. Position will be supervised by the University Libraries’ Open Education & Outreach Librarian.

Hours: 12 month part-time 0.5 FTE appointment (20 hours per week)

Salary: range is $21,852–$24,036

Requirements:

  • Must be a current PhD or Master’s student at the University of Missouri (Columbia campus)
  • Must be pursuing a career in communication, higher education, instructional design, information science or other relevant field(s)
  • Must have excellent external and internal communication skills
  • Must be highly organized

Preferred:

  • Experience with strategic communication projects
  • Experience with graphic design
  • Experience with project management
  • Experience with assessment projects/practices
  • Knowledge of Open Educational Resources (OER) or other trends in higher education

How to Apply: Position to be filled as soon as possible.
Contact Grace Atkins, MU A&OER Campus Committee Co-Chair, for instructions: atkinsge@missouri.edu

24/5 Hours

Ellis Library will be open from noon on Sunday until midnight on Friday and from 8 am until midnight on Saturday starting Tuesday, September 4.

  • Only students, faculty and staff with a valid ID will be allowed in the library from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
  • Service hours, such as check-out and research, are not available during all hours the library is open.

For a complete list of all library hours, please visit library.missouri.edu/hours.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, September 7

Workshops @ Your Library, September 7

Introduction to Endnote

Learn how to use EndNote, a powerful citation program, for your academic writings. The workshop will teach you how to use this tool in order to store citation data, produce in-text citations and bibliographies in various formats.

Date: Friday, September 7, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

Complete List of Workshops @ Your Library

home Ellis Library, Workshops New to Mizzou Fall Workshops @ Your Library

New to Mizzou Fall Workshops @ Your Library

New to Mizzou? Learn about our library and the research process at five one-hour workshops designed just for you!

All workshops are held from 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. in 4D11 Ellis Library. No registration required.

  • Monday, September 10: Exploring the University Libraries
  • Tuesday, September 11: Introduction to Research
  • Wednesday, September 12: Plagiarism: What It Is and How to Avoid It
  • Thursday, September 13: Advanced Research
  • Friday, September 14: Zotero

For additional information about these workshops and more, visit library.missouri.edu/workshops.

You can find workshop recordings at libraryguides.missouri.edu/recordingsandtutorials.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Writing Tutors in Ellis Library

Writing Tutors in Ellis Library

Tutors from the Writing Center will be offering one-on-one writing support in Ellis Library again this fall. All Mizzou students can take advantage of this service. Tutors can help with all stages of the writing process: brainstorming, revising and polishing a final draft. They are familiar with a variety of writing styles and formats.

Writing Tutors’ Schedule
Ellis Library, Room 151-E
Fall 2018

Saturday, August 26 through Finals Week
(no tutors during Thanksgiving Week)

Sunday 4 – 9 pm

Monday to Thursday 11 am – 9 pm

Sign up for appointments on the sign-up sheet which will be posted on the door to Room 151-E at the start of tutoring hours that day. Appointments are for fifty minutes.

Visit the Writing Center’s website to find out more about the writing assistance they offer.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits 13th Documentary Screening: One Read Event

13th Documentary Screening: One Read Event

Join us September 6th at 5pm in Ellis Auditorium for a screening of 13th by filmmaker Ava DuVernay.

This 2016 documentary explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation’s prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans. After the screening, stay for a guided discussion.

Michelle Alexander is prominently featured in the documentary, discussing how mass incarceration has and hasn’t changed since her book was first published.

After the screening, please stay for a guided discussion.

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Government Information Knowledge of Sailors’ Wages Enhances Tours of Only Above-Water Whaleback Ship Museum

Knowledge of Sailors’ Wages Enhances Tours of Only Above-Water Whaleback Ship Museum

This guest post is written by Martin Karpa, Volunteer with the Superior Public Museums in Superior, Wisconsin.

My first job after graduating high school was on a ship sailing the Great Lakes. I worked the freighters for four seasons, hauling iron ore, coal, grain, sand and limestone from Duluth, MN, to Buffalo, NY, and numerous ports in between.

It was just within the last two years that projects around the home were winding down, freeing up more time for interests. With a sailing history and fondness of said, I took an interest in the Superior Public Museums, Superior, WI, of which one of the museums is the last-in-the-world above-water whaleback steamship S.S. Meteor. Volunteer efforts with the museums started out with their annual Volunteer Work Weekend held every last weekend in April when people come from across the Upper Midwest to preserve and prepare the Meteor for guests who tour the ship and learn about its history, sailing in the 1890s, the conception of its unique design and the influence this design has had on the present day shipping industry.

The first work weekend on the Meteor only piqued my interests and I wound up volunteering to come every couple of weeks or so to help out with routine seasonal maintenance on the ship. One thing leads to another, and this role in maintenance has now expanded to also being a volunteer tour guide not only for the Meteor but also at another of the museums, Fairlawn Mansion.

My opinion: dedicated tour guides are not given enough credit. These individuals put themselves out there before the general public and are expected to be the resident authority of what they are teaching, able to field any question thrown at them. Guides will learn the tour script, of course, but many will go above and beyond, gleaning all the facts they can about their particular expertise in order to answer even the most unpredictable question as best they can.

Marie Concannon

One such question was, “What were the sailors’ wages at the time?” (referring to sailors in the 1890s). I didn’t know, said so, and spent some time with the individual after the tour trying to find an answer on the internet without satisfying success. This lead to a more extensive internet search later at home, also without much concrete success. Now, I am not an idiot, but doing such specific research is not in my educational background. All of the clicking around on the net somehow lead me to Marie Concannon‘s contact information as the University of Missouri Libraries’ Head of Government Information. With mounting frustrations over negative search results and no better idea as to where to go with this question, I fired off an email to Marie last August, knowing it was a crapshoot . . . a roll of the dice . . . and I hit the jackpot!

Marie responded promptly, and a very pleasant correspondence followed, impressing me with her passion and dedication to her work. It was obvious even across the internet that she is enthusiastic about researching an issue and my hat is off to her. Information provided by Marie has now been adopted and fit into my personal script when giving tours of the S.S. Meteor, giving those interested in this aspect of our nation’s industrial history a better understanding of daily life at the end of the Victorian Era, beginning of the Gilded Age and into the Progressive Era. Being able to offer more detailed information to guests of the museum also gives them a fuller experience, which in turn helps spread an even more positive review of their visit.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to produce and disseminate knowledge that will improve the quality of life in the state, the nation and the world.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.