home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted high school juniors from around the state to the University of Missouri Campus. “With a carefully selected faculty and staff, a specially designed curriculum that focuses on the liberal arts, and a variety of stimulating extracurricular activities, the academy enables students to be part of a unique learning community.” One of those stops for the academy is the library.

Last year, the students visited with Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, who assisted the students with finding primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. The collaboration was so successful that, Ben Balzer, one of the Missouri Scholars instructors, jumped at the chance for his science fiction students to attend Rachel’s research workshop during the 2018 session as well as expanding that collaboration to include Kelli Hansen, Special Collections Librarian.

Rachel Brekhus

“Their work with my students was, in short, amazing! I extended my collaboration to Kelli because of how much last year’s students enjoyed working with library resources,” says Ben. Both his science fiction and censorship in literature classes met with Kelli, who provided literary texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries for the scholars to examine. The scholars looked at items ranging from a comic version of 2001, A Space Odyssey to a rare copy of Utopia by Thomas More. Ben found this opportunity provided his students the ability “to see the rich artistic tradition that underpins the literature we read today.” The scholars left their visit to Special Collections inspired and excited to work on their research projects.

Ben sees this collaboration being a regular component of his classes. “I want high school students to gain familiarity with university resources so they will feel prepared to make good use of academic libraries when they arrive on college campuses. Students of literature should also be introduced to the social, political, ethical, and historical significance of the texts they read. Working with research librarians helps students better recognize these broader contexts and how they enrich literary study,” says Ben.

Kelli Hansen
Kelli Hansen

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel Black History & Culture Trivia Night

Black History & Culture Trivia Night

Thursday, February 28, 2019
6 to 8:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

Join old and new friends for a fun and competitive celebration of African-American history and culture.

Expect questions about music, local and world history, sports, art, literature and more. Don’t worry if you don’t know much, because plenty of mulligans will be available!

We’ll provide food for all and prizes for the winning teams. Check-in and dinner begin at 6, play begins at 6:30.

Individuals and/or teams need to register. Please register at the University of Missouri Libraries website: https://library.missouri.edu/trivia

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Exodus: Images of Black Migration in Missouri and Beyond, 1866-1940

Presentation on the images and other items in the Black History Month display in Ellis Library on Black Migration in Missouri. Contact: Joan Stack (stackj@ shsmo.org) and Paula Roper (roperp@ missour.edu) Sponsors: State Historical Society and Black History Month Committee

February 4, 2019
4 p.m.
114A Ellis Library

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

This is a guest post written by Dr. Jessie Adolph, an instructor of English at Lincoln University.

oracle | ˈôrək(ə)l | noun a priest or priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity. • a place at which divine advice or prophecy was sought. • a person or thing regarded as an infallible authority or guide on something: casting the attorney general as the oracle for and guardian of the public interest is simply impossiblearchaic a response or message given by an oracle, typically one that is ambiguous or obscure.

Dr. Paula Roper, who I affectionately call “The Oracle” served a crucial role in my development as an educator and a scholar.  During our collaborations on subject topics for English 1000, she transformed the library from a center of archaic readings into a vibrant prophetic learning experience.  She introduced my students to peer-reviewed sources and resource methods making my lessons on historical trauma, spoken-word poetry, and hip-hop culture relative to the lives of my students.  Explicitly, she instructed my students about African and Global Studies traditions influencing popular culture in America.  The undergraduates learned “Nommo,” the power of the word (an Akan word meaning “To Make One Drink), can be utilized as a form of resistance and/or healing to build community. In other words, the young scholars learned they had a voice which can create the sound of power to change their reality.  This in mind, she inspired me as an academic to utilize my voice for change.

Dr. Paula Roper, the Oracle, and Mizzou library helped me to earn my Ph.D. in Africana Diaspora Studies.  My dissertation entitled “Dee-Jay Drop that Deadbeat;” Hip-hop’s Remix of Fatherhood Narratives” an interdisciplinary project required a substantial amount of research.  Specifically, I examined hip-hop fatherhood narratives that constructed imagery of African American fathers and Black identity formation.  Dr. Roper proved instrumental to the project by assisting me to compile an eclectic reading list African diasporic, history, sociology, and psychological to complete my task.  She helped me to maximize my time at the library—I could not have become Dr. Adolph without her expert-tutelage.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Citation Management Workshops

Collect, organize, and format your citations with EndNote, Zotero and Mendeley! Register today at https://library.missouri.edu/workshops

EndNote:

Friday, February 1, 1-2 p.m.

Tuesday, February 12, 3-4 p.m.

Thursday, February 28, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Mendeley:

Tuesday, January 29, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Tuesday, February 19, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Friday, March 8, 1-2 p.m.

Zotero:

Thursday, January 31, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Thursday, February 14, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

Thursday, April 4, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

All sessions held in Ellis Library 213.

Need a different date or time? Groups of five or more can request additional sessions of these workshops at https://library.missouri.edu/workshops

home Events and Exhibits Finals Stress Relief At Your Libraries

Finals Stress Relief At Your Libraries

Finals are a stressful time, and your libraries are here to help! We have our Ask a Librarian research support services and our study spaces are open 24/7 until Dec. 14! We also have stress relief activities at 4 different locations! Check it out:

Ellis Library

  • Therapy Dogs, Dec. 9-12 by the North Doors on floor 1
    • Sunday 1-5pm
    • Monday 7-9pm
    • Tuesday 7-9pm
    • Wednesday 7-9pm
  • Zen coloring pages station by the North Doors on floor 1

Engineering Library

  • Games and coloring pages

Health Sciences Library

  • Relaxation Station with aromatherapy and a chair massager
  • Coloring pages, puzzles, origami and DIY snowflakes
  • On Tuesday 12/11, we will be giving out Hot Chocolate from 4-6pm

Journalism Library

  • Winter Themed Coloring Pages and DIY snowflakes
  • Handing out treats that week
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Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Ellis Library, Hours, Staff news Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Ellis Library will have limited hours during the Thanksgiving Break. For a complete list of the hours of Ellis Library and the specialized hours, visit library.missouri.edu/hours.

The Bookmark Cafe, which is run by Campus Dining Services, will be closed from November 17 to 25. For a complete list of hours for Campus Dining Services locations, visit dining.missouri.edu/hours.

Ellis Library Hours, November 17 to 25

Saturday (Nov. 17)…..10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sunday (Nov. 18)……Closed

Monday (Nov. 19)…..7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Tues (Nov. 20)…..7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Wed (Nov. 21)…..7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thurs (Nov. 22)……Closed

Fri (Nov. 23)…..Closed

Sat (Nov. 24)…..10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sun (Nov. 25)…..Noon to 12 a.m. (Return to 24 hour schedule)

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

This past year, Kate Harlin, a PhD student and graduate instructor, won the Gus Reid Award from the English Department. Gus Reid, having taught composition within this program, donated funds to support an award for graduate students and other instructors who teach exploratory/persuasive writing. The award stipulates that each recipient “should not only be a good writer but an even better critic—one who views the job and self with both discipline and light-heartedness.” Kate applied with materials created from her international composition course, a course that greatly benefited from Kelli Hansen‘s Special Collections assistance.

Kate and Kelli collaborated on an assignment designed so students could choose an object in Special Collections that they wanted to learn more about, generate questions and use as an object to springboard into an exploratory essay. From the get go, this open ended assignment was ambitious, but Kate says, “Kelli was so open and flexible with us that she was able to pull items that got every student in the class excited.”

Kelli Hansen

Kelli pulled a Physics textbook from the 1920s written in Arabic, which one of Kate’s students from Saudi Arabia was able to identify as a translation written by Mizzou professor Oscar Stewart. She also found a poetry manuscript, by Li He of the Tang Dynasty, written in Chinese that many of the Chinese speaking students were thrilled to look through. One of her students even submitted her work for the Mahan Freshman Essay Award and received an honorable mention.

“The best thing about these two examples is that it helped the international students to see themselves as experts and knowledge-producers, which can be hard for any first year college student, but is even more difficult when in a class that is all about a writing in a language that you’re still learning to master,” Kate says.

Kate suggests figuring out a way to incorporate Special Collections in your syllabus and if you don’t know how, reach out to your librarians.Special Collections provided examples that truly inspired Kate’s students and is one of the many reasons why she will continue to collaborate with Kelli for future classes.

“Every semester that I have brought students to Special Collections, I have received feedback that it was a major highlight of the semester! I value inquiry and discovery in the classroom, and there is no better venue for it than Special Collections.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 9

Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 9

Altmetrics: Article Level Metrics for Measuring the Impact of Research

It takes time for your work to be formally cited by other researchers and common citation indexes do not work equally well for all disciplines and research methods. Altmetrics (article level metrics) are faster and wider-ranging measures of the impact your work is having on other researchers and the general public. This workshop will introduce you to current altmetrics tools and how they’re being used to demonstrate the value of research.

Date: Friday, November 9, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

Complete List of Workshops @ Your Library

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Good Things Happen When You Talk To Your Librarian

Good Things Happen When You Talk To Your Librarian

Textbooks are a big expense for students and they are often met with the decision to buy or not to buy a textbook. Knowing textbooks can be an obstacle to his students’ education, Dr. Evan Prost, Associate Teaching Professor, decided to ask the library for assistance.

For the 59 students enrolled in Physical Therapy 6810 Case Management: Geriatrics and Orthopedics, the $111 cost per textbook was a hefty price tag. That’s a cost of $6,549 for the entire class to access Guccione’s Geriatric Physical Therapy Dr. Prost asked the library if there was a way his students to get access to this textbook without paying that astronomical price.

Dr. Prost consulted with Diane Johnson, information services librarian at the Health Sciences Library, to look into the options. While investigating, Diane found the library could purchase an unlimited user, online version of the textbook for $141. This would ensure all 59 students could view the book anytime, at the same time, day or night.

The online version provided instant access to the physical therapy students, along with searching and printing capabilities. Allie Lakie, a senior psychical therapy student, took the time to email to show her cohort’s appreciation for the textbook access. “I just wanted to thank you for your help in us being able to access the Geriatric PT text by Guccione. We really appreciate it!”

Collaborations like these help to advance the University of Missouri’s system-wide efforts to lower the cost of education by addressing textbook costs through the AOER initiative. Libraries and affordability have always gone hand in hand, and the University Libraries are here to help faculty identify high quality, affordable teaching materials to use in their classes. (Read more). If you are interested in consulting with a librarian on how we can work together to keep your students’ textbooks affordable, contact your subject librarian.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.