home Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

The University of Missouri Theatre Department presents an interdisciplinary conference titled “Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama,” to focus on Missouri’s own Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Lanford Wilson. The conference will be held April 26-29 at Ellis Library and the Rhynsburger Theatre and features an MU production of The Rimers of Eldritch directed by Dr. David Crespy.

The conference and all the events scheduled are free and open to the public, with a goal to encourage students and scholars to avail themselves of the Lanford Wilson Collection located in the University of Missouri Libraries Special Collections and Rare Books.  Both the production of The Rimers of Eldritch and a new book edited by David Crespy, Lanford Wilson: Early Stories, Sketches, and Poems, have been supported in part through research in the Lanford Wilson Collection. The conference also features onstage interviews and master classes with guest artists Marshall W. Mason, Lanford Wilson’s Tony® Award-winning director; Tanya Berezin, the former artistic director of New York’s Circle Repertory Company, where Wilson’s plays were first produced; Danny Irvine, founding director of its Circle Rep Lab; and Mary Sue Price, an Emmy award-winning Circle Repertory playwright and protégé of Lanford Wilson.

A full conference schedule and additional information can be found on the Missouri Self-Taught conference website.

home Cycle of Success, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Interlibrary Loan Delivers for Doctors in a Time Crunch

Interlibrary Loan Delivers for Doctors in a Time Crunch

Ever wonder who is behind the magic of Interlibrary Loan? At the Health Sciences Library it’s Katy Emerson.

She’s the one who receives your requests, scans what you need, and emails it to your inbox, all in the matter of a few hours.

If you search for an article and are hit with a paywall or told the library doesn’t have access, don’t worry! You can request it and Katy will work her magic.

Not only will she find articles the library doesn’t have access to, she will often scan items we have on site to save you the trip to your library.

“What I like most is getting to deliver articles to clinicians. It feels good knowing that the work I do could be having a positive impact on patient care.”

Last year, Katy and the Health Sciences Library’s Interlibrary Loan department borrowed close to 4500 articles and delivered another 1800 articles we had available on site all at no cost to our users. Interlibrary Loan is a free service for Mizzou.

To request articles and books, click on the Findit@MU button if it’s available or you can always fill out a request form.

 

 

 

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Friday Workshops Semester Wrap-Up

Friday Workshops Semester Wrap-Up

April 20, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Rm 159, Ellis Library

All Fridays @ the Library participants are invited to join librarians and archivists in a lively discussion of the workshop series. This is your chance to ask for new topics, suggest changes to the series, and reconnect with fellow researchers.

University Libraries Research & Information Services Division

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Asking the Right Questions Pays Off

Asking the Right Questions Pays Off

Mizzou has made its mark on Nikolaus Frier, a senior mechanical engineering major from St. Louis, and he will leave his mark on Mizzou as well. For his field of study, Nik had a couple of in-state options but chose Mizzou, which he says “seemed beautiful and big” and where he knew he’d have many options for getting involved.

Extracurricular activities have in fact brought Nik unanticipated opportunities. He was a member of the 3D Printing Club during the time when the service was transitioning from being student led to being hosted by Mizzou Libraries. “I was losing hours at another campus job,” he said, “so I sent out my feelers and asked if the library would need any additional help running this service.” After demonstrating his knowledge of 3D printing to Ernest Shaw, Manager of Information Technology for the Libraries, Nik found himself employed by Print Anything.

Nik worries that his favorite Mizzou memory “might be a little cheesy,” but going to the midnight barbeque the first week of his freshman year was life changing. He met his girlfriend there, and they celebrated four years together in August.

His second favorite memory is yet to come. As project lead for Make Mizzou, a project of the 3D Printing Club, he’s overseen the design of a 3D campus map for the quad. “We have the 2D kiosks around campus, right?” Nik asks. “We wanted a 3D one so visually impaired students would be better able to navigate campus.” The 3D campus map is currently in the prototype finalization stage and will be installed in the fall.

“Getting involved is the right step into learning about your resources here at Mizzou,” Nik advises his fellow Tigers. “As soon as you’re part of a club, you realize you need this thing done. Well, how would I get that done? Then you start asking the right questions.” Nik is proof that asking the right questions pays off.

Nik plans to work as an engineer after graduation but also is confident that he has learned the necessary skills to open his own model-making company. Either way, he won’t miss what he foresees as his second favorite Mizzou memory: the groundbreaking of the 3D campus map in the fall.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Create Blackout Poems in Ellis Library 4/9-13

Create Blackout Poems in Ellis Library 4/9-13

Celebrate National Poetry Month by creating your own blackout poem in the Ellis Library Colonnade April 9-13.

Blackout poetry is created by marking out words from a text, like a newspaper, until a poem is created from the words that remain. For inspiration, check out others’ creations at Newspaper Blackout.

Newspapers and markers will be provided. Select poems will be posted on Mizzou Libraries’ Instagram account. Sign your poem with your handle if you want to be tagged!

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Libraries Are Where You Go When You Run out of Ideas

Libraries Are Where You Go When You Run out of Ideas

Research Enriches Undergraduate Writers’ Creative Nonfiction

Julija Šukys, Assistant Professor of English and creative nonfiction writer, says, “Libraries are one of my great loves. I’m a huge champion of libraries.” Much of her work is deeply researched, including her most recent books. Epistolophilia: Writing the Life of Ona Šimaitė is an unconventional biography of the Lithuanian librarian whose heroic actions saved an untold number of lives during the Holocaust, while Siberian Exile: Blood, War, and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning, published in October, investigates her own family’s complicated history.

Julija introduces her advanced undergraduate students to the pleasures of combining research and creative work by incorporating a library research day into all of her nonfiction workshops. She finds that sometimes students at this level are “starting to tell the same stories over and over again,” and research is “a way of showing them how you break out of that, how you break out of writing the same narratives. It’s a way of showing them that there’s a bigger world and to look up, to look out, and to learn something as you write. Writing is a way of actually understanding the world better.”

Example Research Topics: the history and evolution of pinball, Berlin nightclub culture, narcissistic personality disorder and marriage, personality formation in fraternal versus identical twins, the hemp industry in the United States, the link between ear infections in children and the development of speech disorders, the influence of anxiety and depression on memory formation, the history of women in cycling, and American mobility and student mobility across the countryStudents begin by drafting personal essays and then are instructed to ask themselves, “What’s the piece that I could crack open with the help of research?” At this point, Julija sends Anne Barker, her subject librarian, their list of research questions. Because the topics arise out of students’ personal stories and interests, this list can be quite quirky.

By the time students show up at the library, Anne has gathered resources appropriate to the various topics. These workshops meet for weekly for two and a half hours, so one class session can accommodate both instruction and practice. During the first half of the session, Anne introduces them to library databases and also demonstrates search strategies that facilitate research “in the broadest terms.” Julija says, “We search really wide-ranging stuff, both scholarship as well as how to find things on Google Books, how to find movies, how to find video clips that are going to be interesting and useful. Students learn that there’s this enormous world that’s available to them.”

Then during the second half of the session, students begin their quest to find two sources for their essays. They have time to run searches, ask questions, and find books in the stacks. Julija reports that students often have their first experience requesting books through MOBIUS or interlibrary loan, or as she calls it, experiencing “the pleasure of having books sent to you from other places in the world.” Some of her students end up using maps or newspapers or doing genealogical research. “What I really want them to learn,” Julija says, “is how to work in a library and how to think about resources and for them to discover the pleasure of working both with archival materials and with books.”

This assignment brings what Anne calls her “detective instincts” to the forefront. She says, “I enjoy working individually with the students to think of different angles to pursue and different types of materials that could augment their research and then seeing them return with the things they’ve discovered. It’s like opening a treasure chest whose contents they can continue to explore for a long time.”

Anne Barker

In addition to helping students find new possibilities in their writing, Anne’s instruction helps Julija accomplish her mission of teaching her students how to use libraries. “Libraries are good places to work, and libraries are places for solace,” she tells them. “Libraries can be this place where you go when you’ve run out of ideas.”

Julija advises other instructors interested in incorporating library instruction into their classes to “plan it in advance and contact the subject librarian early.” She has also found that giving students concrete tasks helps them be able to put what they’ve learned to immediate use, and another recommendation is to “give students class time to do the hands-on work.” Conducting their own research with a librarian available gives students an appropriate balance of independence and support. “It’s very individualized, and on the other hand they’re learning transferable skills.”

Julija’s advice to students is simple: “Talk to a reference librarian because they have skills you can’t even imagine.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Engineering Library Congratulations Noel Kopriva, Head of Engineering Library & Technology Commons

Congratulations Noel Kopriva, Head of Engineering Library & Technology Commons

The University Libraries are pleased to announce that Noel Kopriva has been appointed as Engineering Librarian and Head of Engineering Library & Technology Commons!

Noel has earned a Bachelor’s in English and two Master’s degrees in Library and Information Science and English from the University of Missouri. She has been working for the University of Missouri Libraries for over three and half years as the Librarian to Textile and Apparel Management and to the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. She previously served as the Agriculture Librarian at West Virginia University for seven years.

This past year, Noel has been serving as the Interim Head of the Engineering Library & Technology Commons and we are happy to have her continue her work in a permanent position.

Congratulations, Noel!

home Cycle of Success, Events and Exhibits Congratulations to the 2018 Undergraduate Research Project Contest Winners!

Congratulations to the 2018 Undergraduate Research Project Contest Winners!

Congratulations to the winners of the 2018 University Libraries Undergraduate Research Project Contest!

Beckie Jaeckels won first prize and a $500 scholarship for her paper “Written in Stone: A Critical Look at the Nation’s Dealings with Racial Discussion in 2017.” Her paper is structured around her work with Dr. Berkley Hudson as a Discovery Fellow. Dr. Berkley describes the paper as an exploration of “the twists and turns that have led to today’s debate about the role and the legitimacy of monuments dedicated to the Confederacy and its Lost Cause and those connections with enslavement and with contemporary racial strife and brutality.” Beckie cites a wide variety of 38 primary and secondary sources, from traditional print sources to tweets.

Beckie Jaeckels
Autumn McLain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn McLain won second prize and a $250 scholarship for her research paper “Jonathan Swift, Misanthropy, and ‘The Voyage to The Land of The Houyhnhnms’.” Autumn began her research with primary documents, Swift’s correspondence around the time when he was drafting Gulliver’s Travels, before delving into secondary sources. Her course professor Dr. Stephen Karian says that this strategy “allowed her to foreground her own words and ideas and to prevent them from being subsumed by those of other scholars–something that many undergraduates struggle with when writing research papers.”

The winners’ papers are archived in MOspace, MU’s digital repository, and linked above.

Thanks to the Friends of the University of Missouri Libraries for sponsoring these awards.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean on Display at Ellis Library

Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean on Display at Ellis Library

The Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean exhibit continues with new pieces on display in the Ellis Library Colonnade.

The Museum of Art and Archaeology shares with us a selection of glass, stone, and pottery vessels that served various functions, dating from the Bronze Age to the 8th century CE. These objects represent the ancient cultures of Anatolia, Egypt, and Greece, in addition to those encompassed by the Roman and Islamic world.

 

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

MU Remembers

This year’s MU Remembers ceremony, commemorating students who have passed away since last April, will be held on April 6 at 2 p.m. in Stotler Lounge, Memorial Union. A book in honor of each student will be added to the University of Missouri Libraries’ collection. Commemorative bookplates are placed inside the books, and students are listed as honorees on the books’ library catalog records.

Family and friends are invited to visit Ellis Library to view the books. They will be on display following the ceremony near the Research and Information Desk.

The students’ names and the books selected in their memory are listed below.

John (Max) Critchfield (College of Business):

The Social Function of Accounts: Reforming Accountancy to Save Mankind by John Flower

Nicholas Foster (College of Engineering):

Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression–and the Unexpected Solutions by Johann Hari

Logan Gilbert (College of Arts & Sciences):

Weightlifting Rules: Poems and Photographs by Jean Barrett Holloway

Naira Kuzmich (College of Arts & Sciences):

Paper Lantern: Love Stories by Stuart Dybek

Carolin Scherf (College of Veterinary Medicine):

Plague, Print, and the Reformation: The German Reform of Healing 1473-1573 by Erik A. Heinrichs

Ryan Stoll (MU Informatics Institute):

The United States Tennis Association: Raising the Game by Warren F. Kimball

Andres Velasco Davila (College of Engineering):

Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930 by Benjamin René Jordan

Richard Ward (College of Arts & Sciences):

Counseling Children and Adolescents by Victoria E. Kress, Matthew J. Paylo, and Nicole A. Stargell

Ryan Wilt (College of Business):

A Wrestling Life: The Inspiring Life Stories of Dan Gable by Dan Gable

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.