Twenty Years of Successful Partnership

“The health sciences library is a jewel in the Mizzou library system,” says Dr. Vicki Conn, Professor Emerita at the Sinclair School of Nursing.

As a faculty member at the nursing school, Dr. Conn focused on why patients wouldn’t take their prescribed medications and finding ways to increase exercise in chronically ill adults. Her research spanned over many years and credits Diane Johnson with helping her throughout the journey.

“I was the principal investigator of three National Institutes of Health [NIH] R01 grants for enormous projects and [Diane’s] expertise was critical for securing funding,” relays Dr. Conn. Diane remained on the grants after the funding was secured, being named a co-investigator to assist with the “hard work,” as Dr. Conn calls it.

Diane Johnson

“[Diane] worked with my research staff to facilitate our easy access to the results of searches. For one of our projects, we evaluated over 37,000 potential studies for inclusion. The vast majority of those 37,000 were located by Diane. Diane was a central member of our research team.” With Diane as a member of the research team and closely working with the other researchers, allowed her to completely understand the project. Diane could easily adapt and change with search as needed and know the exact information the team found most beneficial.

Dr. Conn’s and her team also made great use of the library’s interlibrary loan (ILL) department, requesting articles if they needed to be reviewed in their entirety. If the articles weren’t available on campus, ILL borrowed them from other libraries, making sure Dr. Conn and her research team had access to the articles necessary for their grants.

These services were something Dr. Conn highly valued over the twenty years of working with Diane and the library. “I suggest people become acquainted with a librarian. It is very important for the librarian to understand your program of research. A librarian who completely understands your program of research can by a wonderful research collaborator.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Elsevier@Mizzou: Author Workshop

Have you ever wondered how to write a great paper, submit it to the right journal, and get accepted?  Join Elsevier’s David Parsons for an author workshop. The workshop will be Monday, April 29th from 3pm – 4pm in 114A Ellis Library. Attend this workshop to learn about:

  • Identifying the right journal
  • Using proper scientific language
  • Structuring your article
  • Understanding the peer review process
  • Open Access publishing
  • Publishing ethics
  • How to get your research noticed

Refreshments will be provided.  You must pre-register for this event at https://libcal.missouri.edu/event/5337666

home Digital Signage, Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services Digital Media Lab Extended Hours

Digital Media Lab Extended Hours

The Digital Media Lab (DML) now has extended hours in the evening one day a week.

*New*  Tuesday: 12:00 pm (noon) – 7:30 pm

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday: 12:00 pm – 4:30 pm

The Digital Media Lab provides an Audio Recording Booth (very popular); a Film Studio (popular) with green screen and lights; and 3D Scanners. These resources are available for students by reservation. Visit to learn more and reserve a DML space! https://library.missouri.edu/dmc

 

 

home Events and Exhibits Show Me Mizzou Day 2019

Show Me Mizzou Day 2019

Show Me Mizzou Day

Saturday, April 13, 2019
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.   |   Free admission and parking

Join us for a day of discovery and fun. Explore our state’s flagship university through more than 100 events for people of all ages.

Your 21st Century Library
Stop by the 104-year-old Ellis Library to view rare books from the special collections vault and test out high-tech equipment from the digital media lab. Enjoy refreshments and crafting tables for kids.

Register for Show Me Mizzou Day

 

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Providing Access to Resources Directly to Students

Providing Access to Resources Directly to Students

This guest post is written by Dr. Marilyn James-Kracke, Associate Professor of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology.

With the help of Rebecca Graves, Educational Services Librarian, and Mike Spears, System Support Analyst, my students in medical pharmacology are included in the list of students who can use UpToDate and its Lexi-comp drug database for 15 assignments that teach information technology to premedical and prehealth professional students. Each assignment explores different components of drug monographs, drug interactions reports, calculators for renal function, disease treatment strategies and pill identifiers etc.

My students greatly appreciate this opportunity for professional training. These assignments provide additional valuable active learning components to this advanced basic science course.

Mike Spears
Rebecca Graves

For the Medical Physiology course and the Medical Pharmacology course, I provide direct links within the CANVAS course components to electronic textbooks so students can freely access any part of these well recognized textbooks using the library fees they pay as students. The students feel that I have their best interest at heart by saving them textbook dollars while also providing access to quality textbooks.

Thank you librarians for providing these excellent services to my students. I’m glad my students get a great library experience so they learn to value these resources as future professionals.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Resources and Services A&OER Survey for Faculty and Graduate Instructors

A&OER Survey for Faculty and Graduate Instructors

Instructor A&OER Survey 2019

Online Survey – approximately 10 minutes
SURVEY

Open to MU faculty and graduate instructors. Please take this anonymous survey to help The UM System’s Affordable & Open Educational Resources (A&OER) learn more about instructor approaches and practices for the selection of teaching materials. The data received from this survey will be used to formulate new strategies for supporting teaching and learning at the University of Missouri. Survey is open until May 20, 2019.

Survey URL: https://missouri.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0lnuNvcUuysg6G1

Contact: oer@missouri.edu

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted high school juniors from around the state to the University of Missouri Campus. “With a carefully selected faculty and staff, a specially designed curriculum that focuses on the liberal arts, and a variety of stimulating extracurricular activities, the academy enables students to be part of a unique learning community.” One of those stops for the academy is the library.

Last year, the students visited with Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, who assisted the students with finding primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. The collaboration was so successful that, Ben Balzer, one of the Missouri Scholars instructors, jumped at the chance for his science fiction students to attend Rachel’s research workshop during the 2018 session as well as expanding that collaboration to include Kelli Hansen, Special Collections Librarian.

Rachel Brekhus

“Their work with my students was, in short, amazing! I extended my collaboration to Kelli because of how much last year’s students enjoyed working with library resources,” says Ben. Both his science fiction and censorship in literature classes met with Kelli, who provided literary texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries for the scholars to examine. The scholars looked at items ranging from a comic version of 2001, A Space Odyssey to a rare copy of Utopia by Thomas More. Ben found this opportunity provided his students the ability “to see the rich artistic tradition that underpins the literature we read today.” The scholars left their visit to Special Collections inspired and excited to work on their research projects.

Ben sees this collaboration being a regular component of his classes. “I want high school students to gain familiarity with university resources so they will feel prepared to make good use of academic libraries when they arrive on college campuses. Students of literature should also be introduced to the social, political, ethical, and historical significance of the texts they read. Working with research librarians helps students better recognize these broader contexts and how they enrich literary study,” says Ben.

Kelli Hansen
Kelli Hansen

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits Black History & Culture Trivia Night

Black History & Culture Trivia Night

Thursday, February 28, 2019
6 to 8:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

Join old and new friends for a fun and competitive celebration of African-American history and culture.

Expect questions about music, local and world history, sports, art, literature and more. Don’t worry if you don’t know much, because plenty of mulligans will be available!

We’ll provide food for all and prizes for the winning teams. Check-in and dinner begin at 6, play begins at 6:30.

Individuals and/or teams need to register. Please register at the University of Missouri Libraries website: https://library.missouri.edu/trivia

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Black History Month Event, Feb. 4

Exodus: Images of Black Migration in Missouri and Beyond, 1866-1940

Presentation on the images and other items in the Black History Month display in Ellis Library on Black Migration in Missouri. Contact: Joan Stack (stackj@ shsmo.org) and Paula Roper (roperp@ missour.edu) Sponsors: State Historical Society and Black History Month Committee

February 4, 2019
4 p.m.
114A Ellis Library

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

When You Find Your Oracle at the Library

This is a guest post written by Dr. Jessie Adolph, an instructor of English at Lincoln University.

oracle | ˈôrək(ə)l | noun a priest or priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity. • a place at which divine advice or prophecy was sought. • a person or thing regarded as an infallible authority or guide on something: casting the attorney general as the oracle for and guardian of the public interest is simply impossiblearchaic a response or message given by an oracle, typically one that is ambiguous or obscure.

Dr. Paula Roper, who I affectionately call “The Oracle” served a crucial role in my development as an educator and a scholar.  During our collaborations on subject topics for English 1000, she transformed the library from a center of archaic readings into a vibrant prophetic learning experience.  She introduced my students to peer-reviewed sources and resource methods making my lessons on historical trauma, spoken-word poetry, and hip-hop culture relative to the lives of my students.  Explicitly, she instructed my students about African and Global Studies traditions influencing popular culture in America.  The undergraduates learned “Nommo,” the power of the word (an Akan word meaning “To Make One Drink), can be utilized as a form of resistance and/or healing to build community. In other words, the young scholars learned they had a voice which can create the sound of power to change their reality.  This in mind, she inspired me as an academic to utilize my voice for change.

Dr. Paula Roper, the Oracle, and Mizzou library helped me to earn my Ph.D. in Africana Diaspora Studies.  My dissertation entitled “Dee-Jay Drop that Deadbeat;” Hip-hop’s Remix of Fatherhood Narratives” an interdisciplinary project required a substantial amount of research.  Specifically, I examined hip-hop fatherhood narratives that constructed imagery of African American fathers and Black identity formation.  Dr. Roper proved instrumental to the project by assisting me to compile an eclectic reading list African diasporic, history, sociology, and psychological to complete my task.  She helped me to maximize my time at the library—I could not have become Dr. Adolph without her expert-tutelage.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.