Finals Stress Relief At Your Libraries

Finals are a stressful time, and your libraries are here to help! We have our Ask a Librarian research support services and our study spaces are open 24/7 until Dec. 14! We also have stress relief activities at 4 different locations! Check it out:

Ellis Library

  • Therapy Dogs, Dec. 9-12 by the North Doors on floor 1
    • Sunday 1-5pm
    • Monday 7-9pm
    • Tuesday 7-9pm
    • Wednesday 7-9pm
  • Zen coloring pages station by the North Doors on floor 1

Engineering Library

  • Games and coloring pages

Health Sciences Library

  • Relaxation Station with aromatherapy and a chair massager
  • Coloring pages, puzzles, origami and DIY snowflakes
  • On Tuesday 12/11, we will be giving out Hot Chocolate from 4-6pm

Journalism Library

  • Winter Themed Coloring Pages and DIY snowflakes
  • Handing out treats that week
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Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Ellis Library, Hours, Staff news Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Thanksgiving Hours at Ellis Library

Ellis Library will have limited hours during the Thanksgiving Break. For a complete list of the hours of Ellis Library and the specialized hours, visit library.missouri.edu/hours.

The Bookmark Cafe, which is run by Campus Dining Services, will be closed from November 17 to 25. For a complete list of hours for Campus Dining Services locations, visit dining.missouri.edu/hours.

Ellis Library Hours, November 17 to 25

Saturday (Nov. 17)…..10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sunday (Nov. 18)……Closed

Monday (Nov. 19)…..7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Tues (Nov. 20)…..7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Wed (Nov. 21)…..7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thurs (Nov. 22)……Closed

Fri (Nov. 23)…..Closed

Sat (Nov. 24)…..10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sun (Nov. 25)…..Noon to 12 a.m. (Return to 24 hour schedule)

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

This past year, Kate Harlin, a PhD student and graduate instructor, won the Gus Reid Award from the English Department. Gus Reid, having taught composition within this program, donated funds to support an award for graduate students and other instructors who teach exploratory/persuasive writing. The award stipulates that each recipient “should not only be a good writer but an even better critic—one who views the job and self with both discipline and light-heartedness.” Kate applied with materials created from her international composition course, a course that greatly benefited from Kelli Hansen‘s Special Collections assistance.

Kate and Kelli collaborated on an assignment designed so students could choose an object in Special Collections that they wanted to learn more about, generate questions and use as an object to springboard into an exploratory essay. From the get go, this open ended assignment was ambitious, but Kate says, “Kelli was so open and flexible with us that she was able to pull items that got every student in the class excited.”

Kelli Hansen

Kelli pulled a Physics textbook from the 1920s written in Arabic, which one of Kate’s students from Saudi Arabia was able to identify as a translation written by Mizzou professor Oscar Stewart. She also found a poetry manuscript, by Li He of the Tang Dynasty, written in Chinese that many of the Chinese speaking students were thrilled to look through. One of her students even submitted her work for the Mahan Freshman Essay Award and received an honorable mention.

“The best thing about these two examples is that it helped the international students to see themselves as experts and knowledge-producers, which can be hard for any first year college student, but is even more difficult when in a class that is all about a writing in a language that you’re still learning to master,” Kate says.

Kate suggests figuring out a way to incorporate Special Collections in your syllabus and if you don’t know how, reach out to your librarians.Special Collections provided examples that truly inspired Kate’s students and is one of the many reasons why she will continue to collaborate with Kelli for future classes.

“Every semester that I have brought students to Special Collections, I have received feedback that it was a major highlight of the semester! I value inquiry and discovery in the classroom, and there is no better venue for it than Special Collections.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 9

Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 9

Altmetrics: Article Level Metrics for Measuring the Impact of Research

It takes time for your work to be formally cited by other researchers and common citation indexes do not work equally well for all disciplines and research methods. Altmetrics (article level metrics) are faster and wider-ranging measures of the impact your work is having on other researchers and the general public. This workshop will introduce you to current altmetrics tools and how they’re being used to demonstrate the value of research.

Date: Friday, November 9, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

Complete List of Workshops @ Your Library

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Good Things Happen When You Talk To Your Librarian

Good Things Happen When You Talk To Your Librarian

Textbooks are a big expense for students and they are often met with the decision to buy or not to buy a textbook. Knowing textbooks can be an obstacle to his students’ education, Dr. Evan Prost, Associate Teaching Professor, decided to ask the library for assistance.

For the 59 students enrolled in Physical Therapy 6810 Case Management: Geriatrics and Orthopedics, the $111 cost per textbook was a hefty price tag. That’s a cost of $6,549 for the entire class to access Guccione’s Geriatric Physical Therapy Dr. Prost asked the library if there was a way his students to get access to this textbook without paying that astronomical price.

Dr. Prost consulted with Diane Johnson, information services librarian at the Health Sciences Library, to look into the options. While investigating, Diane found the library could purchase an unlimited user, online version of the textbook for $141. This would ensure all 59 students could view the book anytime, at the same time, day or night.

The online version provided instant access to the physical therapy students, along with searching and printing capabilities. Allie Lakie, a senior psychical therapy student, took the time to email to show her cohort’s appreciation for the textbook access. “I just wanted to thank you for your help in us being able to access the Geriatric PT text by Guccione. We really appreciate it!”

Collaborations like these help to advance the University of Missouri’s system-wide efforts to lower the cost of education by addressing textbook costs through the AOER initiative. Libraries and affordability have always gone hand in hand, and the University Libraries are here to help faculty identify high quality, affordable teaching materials to use in their classes. (Read more). If you are interested in consulting with a librarian on how we can work together to keep your students’ textbooks affordable, contact your subject librarian.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Ellis Library, Workshops Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 2

Workshops @ Your Library, Nov. 2

Preserving and Promoting Your Research: Theses/Dissertations in MOspace

Providing online access to your thesis or dissertation makes it more visible and available to fellow researchers around the world. But what about copyright and other publishing agreements? Do you need to get permission to include images and copyrighted material? Learn about these issues as well as the logistics, benefits, and complications of promoting your work with MOspace, MU’s online repository for MU theses and dissertations.

Date: Friday, November 2, 2018
Time: 1 to 2 p.m.
Location: 213 Ellis Library

Begin Registration

Complete List of Workshops @ Your Library

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

To Dr. William Krause, education needs to be open and without borders. “We should share information. Not hold it for a select few to access.”

Since the beginning of his Mizzou career in 1971, Dr. Krause has been a proponent of helping students learn and giving them the resources they need. “I’ve always felt very strongly that any student, under my tutelage, should have all their materials provided for them.” He even went as far as writing a couple of textbooks, streamlining them to fit the educational needs of the medical students and taking the extra step to find a publisher to make the textbooks as cheap as possible.

For several years, Dr. Krause taught 96 medical students anatomy and histology. “It was very difficult for me to rotate to all the groups in the labs and answer their questions about the slides. [They] would get frustrated waiting to get my help,” says Dr. Krause. Wanting to make sure his students received the help they needed, he applied for and was awarded a grant to work with a multi-headed microscope for help sessions. With this new equipment, he could easily show this large group the slides. “After three or four years of doing this, even those sessions became too crowded. Everyone wanted the extra help.” Dr. Krause knew he had to find a better way to help his students. When a new chair of the department came on board, Dr. Krause took the opportunity to pitch the chair his new idea.

Screenshot of Dr. Krause’s Blood and Bone Marrow Video

“I wanted to place a camera in the eye piece of the microscope and record me narrating and using the electronic pointer in real time.” The new chair was sold on the idea and gave him the go ahead to buy and use any equipment he needed to create these videos. Dr. Krause developed a set of 24 video tutorials and provided DVD copies for each medical student. That’s a total of 2,304 DVDs per year, mostly out of his own pocket. Eventually, it became too expensive to continue making copies, not to mention the DVDs would damage over time. Dr. Krause turned to the library and asked how could he still provide access to these videos while finding cheaper means of doing so.

Diane Johnson at the Health Sciences Library suggested adding them to Google as it was new and could handle 96 students watching 24 videos. Once placed on Google, Dr. Krause started receiving notes of gratitude not only from his students, but from students all over the world thanking him for sharing his knowledge. After a few years, Google wanted Dr. Krause to shorten the videos. Dr. Krause felt that shortening them would make the videos less helpful. Once again, he turned to the library.

Wanting to keep the integrity of the videos, while still keeping freely available, Dr. Krause consulted with Diane Johnson about how best to proceed. She suggested the new repository the library was managing: MOSpace. Following her advice, Dr. Krause added the videos, along with accompanying educational pdfs, to MOSpace. “I was happy to add to MOSpace. It gives the opportunity for people to tap into information from anywhere and makes it more universal,” explains Dr. Krause.

Top Countries by Downloads from April 2018-October 2018

Dr. Krause, while retired now, still continues to help students here at Mizzou and all over the world. With a total of 4,053 views for the videos and close to 19,000 views for the educational pdfs, users are still finding Dr. Krause’s collection. During the month of September 2018, his videos were downloaded over 800 times.

Dr. Krause cannot be more excited about the open education movement at Mizzou. He may have missed the initiative by three years, but he is happy to know that things are changing on campus. “I am delighted I’ve been able to help so many people from so many areas. This is such a tremendous avenue to make material available in the easiest format possible for our students at [little to] no cost.”

Dr. Krause’s videos, blogs and textbooks are found in MOSpace, where they are free to view and download.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Cycle of Success Edward McCain Receives NDSA Innovation Award

Edward McCain Receives NDSA Innovation Award

We are delighted to announce the recipients of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance’s (NDSA) annual Innovation Awards!

Individual Award: Edward McCain, University of Missouri Libraries and Reynolds Journalism Institute
Organization Award: Texas Digital Library
Project Award: UC Guidelines for Born-Digital Archival Description
Educator Awards: Heather Moulaison Sandy
Future Steward Award: Raven Bishop

These awards highlight and commend creative individuals, projects, organizations, educators, and future stewards demonstrating originality and excellence in their contributions to the field of digital preservation.

As the Digital Curator of Journalism and founder of the Journalism Digital News Archive, Edward McCain has been and is a leading voice and passionate advocate for saving born digital news. He has advanced awareness and understanding of the crisis we face through the loss of the “first rough draft of history” in digital formats. In collaboration and with support from colleagues and community members, he has led the “Dodging the Memory Hole” outreach agenda. Thus far, five “Memory Hole” forums have brought together journalists, editors, technologists, librarians, archivists, and others who seek solutions to preserving born-digital news content for future generations. By bringing together thought leaders in the news industry and information science, the forums have broadened the network of stakeholders working on this issue and helped these communities gain critical insight on the challenges and opportunities inherent in preserving content generated by a diverse array of news media, both commercial and non-profit.

Edward McCain would like to mention that the following people have been essential to the success of the “Dodging the Memory Hole” outreach program:

Dorothy Carner, Ann Riley, Jim Cogswell, Mike Holland and Jeannette Pierce, University of Missouri Libraries
Randy PIcht, Reynolds Journalism Institute
Katherine Skinner, Educopia Institute
Peter Broadwell, Todd Grapone and Sharon Farb, UCLA Library
Martin Klein, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Brewster Kahle, Mark Graham and Jefferson Bailey, Internet Archive
Brian Geiger, University of California, Riverside
Anna Krahmer, University of North Texas
Senator Roy Blunt and his staff
Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information
Martin Halbert, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Jim Kroll, Denver Public Library
Leigh Montgomery, Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Eric Weig, University of Kentucky
Frederick Zarndt, Global Connections
The Institute for Museum and Library Services
The Mizzou Advantage
And last but not least, my wife, Rosemary Feraldi

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Open Access Week 2018: Documentary Film Screening in Ellis Library

Open Access Week 2018: Documentary Film Screening in Ellis Library

Join us for an Open Access Week screening of the documentary film Paywall: The Business of Scholarship.

Tuesday, October 23
Ellis Library room 114A
2 to 3:15 pm

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary film on scientific publishing business and on the need for open science. It reports on the huge profit margins of the big publishing companies, like Elsevier, Springer and Wiley and the challenges for open science to change the situation. Scientists, science administration, librarians, editors of scientific journals, open access-activists, representatives of scientific publishing houses and the founder of Academia.edu give their opinions on the matter. This film focuses on the need for Open Access in research and science. There will be a 15 minute post-screening discussion for anyone who would like to stay after the viewing.

What is Open Access?
Open Access is a growing international movement that uses the Internet to throw open the locked doors that once hid knowledge. Encouraging the unrestricted sharing of research results with everyone, the Open Access movement is gaining ever more momentum around the world as research funders and policy makers put their weight behind it.

For more University Libraries’ Open Access Week events, check out this post.

home Digital Signage, Events and Exhibits Celebrate Open Access Week and MOspace 10th Anniversary, Oct. 25

Celebrate Open Access Week and MOspace 10th Anniversary, Oct. 25

October 25, 2018
Ellis Library Colonnade
1-3 p.m.

Join us for refreshments and information about Open Access activities at the University of Missouri. Everyone is welcome!

What is MOspace?
The MOspace Institutional Repository is an online repository for creative and scholarly works and other resources created by faculty, students and staff at the University of Missouri (Columbia) and the University of Missouri–Kansas City. MOspace makes these resources freely available on the web and assures their preservation for the future.

What is Open Access?
Open Access is a growing international movement that uses the Internet to throw open the locked doors that once hid knowledge. Encouraging the unrestricted sharing of research results with everyone, the Open Access movement is gaining ever more momentum around the world as research funders and policy makers put their weight behind it.