home Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services, Uncategorized Library Curbside Pickup Now Available for MU Faculty and Students

Library Curbside Pickup Now Available for MU Faculty and Students

Library circulation services ceased abruptly in mid-March at the beginning of the Covid-19 closures. Reopening these services will be incremental starting July 1, and continue gradually until full check out services will be restored by the beginning of the fall semester.

How does Ellis Library Curbside Pickup work?

Starting July 1, curbside pickup of MU library materials will be available for MU-affiliated library users. Library materials requested through the MERLIN catalog (up to 30 requests per user) may be picked up at the Ellis Library Loading Dock. When the books requested (See How to Request/Place Holds for Curbside Pickup) are ready for pickup, you will receive an email with a link to the Ellis Library Loading Dock appointment calendar with instructions to select a time. (Pickup slots are 15 minutes long, Mon-Fri, between 10am-3pm.) You will not be able to make an appointment before the books are ready.

When you arrive during your 15-minute appointment, park in the loading dock area (or nearby on Hitt Street) and call the Check Out Desk (573-882-3362). Staff will then deliver your bag of checked out library materials. Please have your ID card out and ready to view. Staff are not able to accept library returns during pickup appointments. Please return library materials in the book drop located at the Ellis Library West Entrance, accessible 24/7.

How long must I wait to pick up my books after I place the request/hold?

Due to on-site staffing shortages, book quarantines, and reduction in some library services, the time for this process may take four to eight business days. We will try as hard as possible to fill requests quickly.

Can I get books from the specialized libraries? 

Books from the specialized libraries may be picked up at Ellis Library, but this may take a few additional days. If you wish to pick up these books at the specialized libraries, however, please contact that library directly for specific details.

 

Curbside pickup for non-MU library users and for materials from other MERLIN and MOBIUS libraries will be available later this summer. In addition, equipment check out will resume when the fall semester begins.

Questions? Call Ellis Library Check Out Desk at 573-882-3362 or email MULibraryCircDesk@missouri.edu

 

 

 

 

 

New Books at the Engineering Library

Happy Summer Tigers!  Although we are bummed that we can’t see you in person yet, rest assured we are busy preparing for the day we do!  Here are a sampling of new books that will be waiting for you when you return.

Advancing diversity, inclusion, and social justice through human systems engineering – Advancing Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice through Human Systems Engineering highlights how scholars and practitioners of HSE (inclusively defined to span many fields) can apply their theories and methods to understand and support healthy communities, include and empower diverse populations, and inspire strategies for a more inclusive future. T59.7.A37 2020

All blood runs red: the legendary life of Eugene Bullard – boxer, pilot, soldier, spy
The incredible life story of Eugene Bullard, the first African American military pilot in WWI, who went on to become a self-taught jazz musician, a Paris nightclub impresario, a spy in the French Resistance and an American civil rights pioneer. Eugene Bullard lived one of the most fascinating lives of the twentieth century. The son of a former slave and an indigenous Creek woman, Bullard fled home at the age of eleven to escape the racial hostility of his Georgia community.  TL540.B7492K425 2019

Culture of women in tech – This book offers a critical analysis of the contemporary and global tech culture and exposes the gender bias of masculine tech ideology and stereotypes.  T36.H37 2020

Computer vision-based agricultural engineering – This unique work provides student, engineers and technologists working in research, development, and operations in the agricultural engineering with critical, comprehensive and readily accessible information. The book applies development of artificial intelligence theory and methods including depth learning and transfer learning to the field of agricultural engineering testing.  S675.Z49 2020

In the making: digital fabrication and disability – The basic principles of digital fabrication – the transformation from concept to physical entity – offer intriguing possibilities for aesthetic and cultural readings, particularly from the perspectives of disability. Online, open access maker communities mean that anyone with an internet connection and a desktop 3D printer is able to download and print a wide variety of replicable and customisable objects. What might this mean for disabled people?  TS171.95.H87 2020

Motor vehicles, the environment, and the human condition : driving to extinction – The world now has more than a billion motor vehicles, and this number continues to increase as developing countries imitate developed societies in their adoption of the culture of automobility. Motor Vehicles, the Environment, and the Human Condition: Driving to Extinction explores the political ecology of motor vehicles in an era of growing social disparities and environmental crises, the latter of which are most manifest in anthropogenic climate change to which motor vehicles are a major contributor. TD886.5.B34 2019

 

Do you have a purchase recommendation?  Email us at eltc@missouri.edu

 

Mara Inge

Mara Inge is a Sr. Library Information Specialist in the Engineering Library. She specializes in outreach activities and facilitates Comic Book Club.

home Government Information, Resources and Services A Government Document explores the history of that summer staple, the swim suit!

A Government Document explores the history of that summer staple, the swim suit!

Summer officially arrived a couple of weekends ago, and with it the promise of many hot, sunny days — days just right for a nice dip in a cool body of water. As you gather up your swimming gear for a trip to your favorite secret swimming hole, backyard slip ‘n slide, or social distancing pool, we invite you to consider what that swimming kit would have looked like in years gone by with the help of a government document.

An MU Librarian in Jefferson City in 1969.

Published in 1969, Women’s Bathing and Swimming Costume in the United States is a paper from the Smithsonian Institution’s Bulletin series. In it, costume historian Claudia B. Kidwell traces the evolution of the bathing costume and, later, the swimming costume, starting in the late 18th century. At the same time, she sheds light on history of the sport itself.

In the late 1700s and into the 1850s, long linen or flannel bathing gowns were worn by bathers such as Martha Washington when they went for therapeutic plunges in mineral springs (p.6-7). These loose gowns resembled the chemise, an undergarment also worn at the time, but were usually in dark colors to better hide the figure. Some had weighted hems or were belted to keep them in place when entering the water (p.14-15).

Next, from the 1840s to 1870s, came the bifurcated bathing dress featuring pantaloons under a long overdress or combination of blouse and skirt made of woolen, linen or serge fabric. This style gave bathers more freedom to frolic in the waves on the seashore. Some of the ankle length drawers, or bloomers, featured suspenders, while others were belted. Straw bathing hats, a hooded bathing mantle or cloak, and manila or cork slippers completed the ensemble (p. 16-20).

A swim cap in 1942.

Starting in the 1880s and into the first quarter of the 20th century, the princess style bathing dress was to be found worn by beach-goers. A combination blouse and drawers with a removable skirt, this style allowed even more activity in the water. The skirt could be taken off while swimming, then modestly buttoned back to the waist when out of the water. Serge and mohair fabrics in dark blue and black were commonly used. Sleeves began to shorten during this time, and the use of knitted bathing tights instead of drawers or knickerbockers appeared in the 1890s. Waxed linen, oiled silk, or rubber bathing caps, sometimes covered by a bright turban, protected the hair (p.21-23).

By 1917, there were a two main options for bathing suits: a loose straight suit with no waistline worn with a belt or sash at the hips or the short-sleeved surplice suit with a skirt and bloomers. A third option, the knitted jersey suit, was reserved for expert swimmers (p.26-27). And with the growing popularity of swimming, such swimming suits all but replaced the prior bathing costumes in the 1920s (p.24).

Advertisement from the May 1923 issue of Vanity Fair.

The earliest swimming suits for women appeared in the 1880s; called “bathing jerseys”, they were form-fitting tunics that reached mid-thigh, featured high necks and cap sleeves, and were worn over trunks and stockings or tights (p.24). Knitted one-piece, skirtless swimsuits of the style typical for men were worn by pioneering women swimmers in the late 1900s and 1910s (p.26). By the 1920s, one- and two-piece knitted swimming suits were available; they were worn with stockings and satin or canvas slippers and accompanied by a beach cloak or wide-collared bathing wraps, colorful beach hats, and parasols (p.28). Necklines and armholes grew lower as the decade progressed and by the 1930s, when having a sun tan became popular, “swimming suits covered less of the bather” (p.30).

An MU Librarian’s grandparents on their honeymoon in Mexico in 1946.

In the 30s, colorful suits featuring novelty effects were produced as swimsuits became stylish as well as functional. The introduction of man-made fabrics and elastic yarn were important innovations in the emerging swim suit industry. The 1940s saw the first bikini arrive in the U.S. from France, while in the 1950s swim suits were designed to sculpt and control the figure with the help of the skillful use of fabrics and plastic boning (p.31-32).

As shown in this highlight of Ms. Kidwell’s interesting look at the history of swimwear, the bathing and swimming costumes worn by our ancestors mirrored the changing social acceptability of swimming over the years. So as you put on your goggles this weekend, give a thought to those who used to swim swathed in yards of fabric or in itchy wool suits!

An MU Librarian’s grandfather in the mid 1930s.
At the beach in 1935!
An MU Librarian’s grandmother at the pool in Kansas City in the late 1940s.
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Lindsay Yungbluth

Lindsay Yungbluth is a Library Information Specialist at Ellis Library where she works in Government Documents.

home Gateway Carousel Zalk Veterinary Medical Library, Resources and Services, Staff news Antiracist Reading List: Ebooks Available at Mizzou Libraries

Antiracist Reading List: Ebooks Available at Mizzou Libraries

Not sure where to start? Here are a few books that can help you be more than “not racist.”

Mizzou students, staff, and faculty can access these ebooks using the links. If you have a Daniel Boone Regional Library library card, you can check out the titles featured in the Daniel Boone Regional Libraries’ list of antiracist recommendations.

We have many more books available in print, and starting in July, you can place a copy on hold to pick up using our curbside service.

Racism

Education and Racism

Image courtesy of Jane Mount.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

LGBTQ Library Resources at Mizzou

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots. This year marks the 50th anniversary of LGBTQ+ pride traditions.

With Pride Month, we wanted to highlight a few of our guides dedicated to LGBTQ resources. These guides are updated throughout the year.

Our guide, LGBTQ Resources, provides useful resources for research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer issues, and for members, family, and friends of the LGBTQ community. Whether you are a student looking for help with your papers and projects or you are looking for reading recommendations, this guide is a good resource.

If you are interested in LGBTQ health resources, we have a guide that links to community and nationwide resources, as well as books & media recommendations in Mizzou Libraries and beyond.

Not everything on these guides are behind a paywall. If there is a resource you cannot access, we encourage you to look at your local and university library or local bookstore.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services Race and University Life: Readings for MU Faculty and Staff

Race and University Life: Readings for MU Faculty and Staff

Back in November 2015, Race and University Life: Readings for MU Faculty and Staff, was created as a response to anti-racist activism at the University of Missouri. This guide is often updated to continue to contribute to the anti-racism conversation on campus and in the United States.

In this guide, you will find resources listed under the following categories:

  • Narratives– either firsthand accounts of racism as it is experienced by racial minorities in the United States, or journalistic reports and editorials from popular media.
  • Studies- there are hundreds of studies examining various aspects of racism and how people deal with it. These are selected for strength of method, readability by the educated nonspecialist, suggested solutions.
  • Books- authors of these studies are scholars in the fields of economics, geography, history, journalism, law and sociology.
  • Statistics- includes both statistics related to race and racism at Mizzou and beyond Missouri.
  • Underrepresented Groups at Mizzou- this includes histories, periodicals, and resources from our student unrest and activism collection in the University Archives.
  • Podcasts, Video, and Social Media- recommendations of non-book resources as well as links to prominent black voices on social media
  • Supporting Local- a list of black owned businesses in Columbia, Missouri.

This guide is a curated list of resources, not just for information related to Mizzou, but for information related to race and racism beyond the Mizzou campus. Not everything on this guide is behind a paywall. If there is a resource you cannot access, we encourage you to look at your local and university library or local bookstore.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Summer 2020 Online Textbooks at the Health Sciences Library

Summer 2020 Online Textbooks at the Health Sciences Library

Summer 2020 required and recommended online textbooks for classes in the School of NursingSchool of Health Professions and the Department of Health Management and Informatics are now available. Each course has its own corresponding tab.

We made the decision to only link to online textbooks since our physical library is closed and our print books cannot be checked out at this time.

Unfortunately, we don’t have all the books required for every class. If we don’t have your textbook, you can recommend the library purchase a copy.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services Welcome to the University Libraries

Welcome to the University Libraries

Welcome Tigers! We’re so glad you’re here, and we’re sad that we don’t get to see you in person this summer. Although Summer Welcome takes place online this year to keep you and your family safe, we still wanted to introduce you to the library resouces and services that will be vital to your success at Mizzou. Visit our Summer Welcome website to get started. We hope you have a great Summer Welcome experiene, and we look forward to meeting you in the fall!

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Update Now June 8th: New Health Sciences Library Website To Go Live

Update Now June 8th: New Health Sciences Library Website To Go Live

Over the past year, the Health Sciences Library has been developing a new look to our website. We’ve conducted several usability tests to make sure everything you need is easier to find and our website is more user friendly.

New features include:

  • Search box optimized to find articles, ebooks and databases
  • Updated look and feel
  • Enhanced alert systems

Update: The new website, previously scheduled to go live on Monday, June 1st, is now going live Monday, June 8. During that time, the site will be down for about an hour for the transition.

If you need assistance, please email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Resources and Services Update on Library Services

Update on Library Services

As part of our phased-in plan to increase library services, the book drop at the west entrance of Ellis Library (near Speaker’s Circle) is open. We cannot accept books at any other book drops. You may return or renew library books. Because we have limited staff in the building, there will be a delay in staff checking in your items, and returned items may not be removed immediately from your account.

Currently, we cannot accept donated materials that have not already been approved.

Starting June 1, we will resume our scan and deliver service. The Libraries will retrieve and scan periodical articles, book chapters, proceedings, technical reports, government documents and any part of other printed publications held in the Mizzou Libraries.

The Libraries plan to offer pre-arranged check out of books, with curbside pickup, on July 1.

Even though the buildings will remain closed for awhile, the Libraries will continue reference chat, remote consultations and instructional support throughout the summer.

Plans are being made for how to safely open Ellis Library and the specialized libraries for the fall semester.