Cycle of Success: Dr. Noah Manring and Engineering 2500

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Dr. Noah D. Manring is the Glen A. Barton Professor of fluid power in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri. He previously served as chairman of the college’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and twice has served as associate dean of research. One of the courses he teaches is Engineering 2500: A History of Modern Engineering. It is through teaching this class that Dr. Manring came to know Tim Perry, one of our Special Collections Librarians. Tim arranged a lecture and demonstration on the printing press to teach the students about the history of the book, and the progression of book making since Gutenberg’s printing press in the 1450s.

Tim Perry, Special Collections

“Tim arranged an entire demonstration and working lecture for our students.  He answered questions, translated texts, and explained the significance of each item that was shown. There were three tables full of items to show and discuss. It was a very rich experience for my class – something I could not have provided for our students on my own.The library has a tremendous collection of printed material since Gutenberg’s day, including an original page from a Gutenberg Bible!”

We asked Dr. Manring what advice he had for those interested in using the library: “Make inquiries as to what resources are available, and use them!  I was referred to the Special Collections section of the library by Prof. Mark Smith in History, and I have since used this resource for my class three times.  Before Mark pointed me in this direction, I had no idea what was available and the wealth of information that could be drawn from our archives.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success: Librarian Finds Century-Old Line Drawing in Digital Library

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Linda Hillemann, Clinical Instructor/Online Education and Field Support Specialist in the School of Social Work, works off campus and supports online students in southern Missouri. She was updating a lecture on the history of social work on Canvas when she realized she didn’t have a credit for a diagram by Mary Richmond, one of the founders of social work. Linda describes her research process: “I have digital copies of some of her documents and was pretty sure which one it came from, but I was wrong! Not only was it not from her book Social Diagnosis, it wasn’t in any of the other documents I have. So I started Googling. There are only so many websites devoted to social work history so I was pretty confident I could find it back, but it was much harder than I expected.”

After searching all the sites she knew with all the search terms she could think of to no avail, she contacted her subject librarian, Kimberly Moeller, for help. Kimberly was able to reverse engineer a search, and Linda says, “A mere two hours later I had the reference and a link to the document.”

Linda Hillemann

Kimberly found the original pencil drawing in conference proceedings over a century old. She explains, “The diagram was first presented and published at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in 1901, which didn’t originally come up in the search I ran. However, Richmond’s colleagues were apparently so impressed with her work that the diagram was mentioned in numerous iterations of this same conference, referring back to the proceedings from 1901.” Kimberly provided Linda with a link to the scanned version of the proceedings available through the digital library Hathi Trust, which meant she had immediate access.

Linda had never seen the conference proceedings before and found it be a fascinating historical document. More importantly, it provided the reference she needed to include vital information in her course. She explains that the diagram “demonstrates a clear line of a basic social work concept from our beginnings to current practice. That was something I wanted to demonstrate in this lecture: our connection today to our remarkable history, and thanks to Kim I was able to do that.”

Kimberly Moeller

Linda and her online students rely on Kimberly and other librarians to help them locate and obtain materials since they are not able to visit the library in person. When it comes to using the library or needing research assistance, Linda advises, “If you need something, ask, even if it seems like a pretty wild-eyed request. I think these librarians can pull rabbits out of a hat.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success: Missouri Scholars Academy Students Research Historical and Cultural Influences on Literature

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.” This summer, students in the Missouri Scholars Academy reaped those benefits.

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted rising high school juniors from around the state to our campus. Ben Batzer, one of 2017 instructors, described how this residential program benefits Missouri’s most gifted high school students: “They take intensive classes in the fields of their choosing, attend a lecture and speaker series, and learn ways they can become engaged citizens in their schools and community.”

Ben’s students were researching late twentieth-century topics that related science to science fiction. Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, guided the students by giving them a tour of Ellis Library and showing them how to find primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. She demonstrated how to use online databases to find scholarly information and historical newspapers.

“My students worked with Rachel in conducting periodical research,” Ben said, “which allowed them to pursue queries of their own choosing in order to better understand the historical and cultural influences that bear on literary production. For many students, this project was the most sustained research they had ever conducted.”

Here are a few of the many positive remarks students had about their experience working with Rachel:

  • Thank you for being so passionate about what you do.
  • Thank you for guiding us through the magical world of the library!
  • I’ve spent a lot of time in that library and I probably would have gotten lost if it wasn’t for you!
  • Thank you for sharing your passion for research and your love of the library with us!

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Cycle of Success, Support the Libraries Library Ambassadors and Student Advisory Council

Library Ambassadors and Student Advisory Council

Welcome back to all students–we hope your semester is off to a great start!

Have you heard of the Library Ambassadors program? It’s a low-commitment, high-impact way for students to support the libraries. To learn more about the Library Ambassadors program, and how you can be involved, check out the Library Ambassadors info page.

All Library Ambassadors are welcome to attend the University Libraries Student Advisory Council (ULSAC) as non-voting participants. For meeting dates and times, check out the ULSAC info page.

Questions about either program? Contact Grace Atkins, student outreach coordinator: atkinsge@missouri.edu

 

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & OER Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. They focus on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

Cycle of Success: R. B. Moody’s Great Granddaughter

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s land-grant mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

 

Finding Family History on a Visit to the Vet

In June 2017, Kellie Green stopped into the Zalk Veterinary Medical Library after having been at the Veterinary Health Center with her mom and her mom’s dog Stella. Kellie wondered if the library could help her find out any information about her great grandfather, R.B. Moody. She knew that he had been on the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) faculty, but wasn’t sure exactly when. She also knew that he graduated from Kansas State in 1943.

With that information, Kate Anderson, Head of Zalk Library, and Sue Giger, Library Information Assistant, went to work. One of the best sources of CVM history is the digitized collection of Veterinary Medical Review, the College’s newsletter published from 1967 to 2007. Because this MOspace collection is full-text searchable, they could quickly pinpoint articles of interest and send them to Kellie.

They found that R.B. Moody served on the Mizzou faculty from 1948-1951 and went on to work for the USDA’s Missouri office. As an added bonus, they found that Kansas State had digitized its collection of graduation composites!

 

 

Kellie was thrilled to find out these bits of information that help fill in some gaps in their family’s knowledge:

Oh my goodness!!!! I am overwhelmed with gratitude!! I cannot thank you both enough for taking time out of your day to research this for our family!!! My grandma will be overjoyed. He is greatly missed. It is so nice to see his handsome face on that graduation photo 🙂

I can’t wait to relay the info to my mom and grandma!! Thank you both so very much, that was so kind of you!!! We are so appreciative!

For Kate and Sue, the question was a fun reminder that they never know what they’ll be asked. As Sue commented, “Throw any question at us. We’re on it.”

 

Thank you, Kellie, for letting us highlight this story about your family!
And thank you to the MOspace team for digitizing CVM history and bringing it to life!

home Cycle of Success, Gateway Carousel Congratulations to Michaelle Dorsey for her Chancellor’s Outstanding Staff Award!

Congratulations to Michaelle Dorsey for her Chancellor’s Outstanding Staff Award!

Once a year during Staff Recognition Week, the Chancellor’s Outstanding Staff Award is given to one person in each of four job categories.  The award “represents those who best reflect honor upon the University and the community through a combination of job performance, job-related personal qualities, relationship with their associates, and the ability to relate their work to the missions and values of the University.” Considering the number of employees currently employed at MU, this is a great honor.  Ellis Library is lucky enough to have an amazing staff member who won the Chancellor’s Outstanding Staff Award this year, Michaelle Dorsey, head of our physical processing/preservation unit.

Tell us a little about your background and experience?

I have a BFA in painting and a BA in English Literature from Truman State University.  In May 2017, I earned my Master of Arts Degree in Information Science and Learning Technologies with an emphasis in Library Science (what a mouthful!).  While at Truman State University, I was a student assistant in the physical processing unit at Pickler Library.  I started at Ellis Library in 1994.

What’s the most arduous task you have?

Hands down, the most arduous task is disaster recovery.  Disaster recovery is mentally and physically exhausting.  In addition, for library staff, damage to the physical collection and the building elicit strong emotions that last well into the recovery process.  During the 2011 fire, it was difficult to work against the clock, directing the salvage of physical library materials, finding resources needed to continue the effort, acting as mediator between areas with different priorities while dealing with the emotional and psychological ramifications of the vandalism.  After the initial recovery effort, library routine goes back to normal but recovery of damaged library materials is an ongoing process for Technical Services staff long after the initial event.

Is there any task you enjoy doing personally, rather than delegating?

There are many parts of my job that I enjoy.  However, I’m happiest when performing preservation and conservation treatment.  As my responsibilities as a manger grow, I have less time to personally repair library materials.  This is sometimes hard for me to reconcile.  I derive great satisfaction from working with my hands, knowing that through my efforts, library resources continue to be available for scholars, students, and researchers.  However, I remind myself that the more skills I pass along to those I supervise, the more impact we can have on the state of the MU Libraries Collection.

Now that you’ve completed your Master’s degree, what are you working on?

The MU School of Information Science and Learning Technologies doesn’t offer a conservation component so I focused on digital preservation and digital libraries.  I’m currently apprenticing with James Downey, a local conservator.  Mr. Downey and I are working with MU Special Collections to identify RARE items in our collection that need conservation treatment.  The plan is for me to begin performing conservation treatment in-house.

You currently work on preservation, but are still learning conservation.  What is the difference between the two?

Preservation treatment and conservation treatment require similar hand skills but the decision-making, purpose, and philosophy differ.  Preservation prolongs the life of library materials in the general collection, allowing them to remain viable to the user with the idea that they are not currently rare and can be replaced or are owned by a large number of other institutions.  Conservation is performed to prolong the life of the item for a benchmark of 300 years (as long as it is kept in the proper environment) with an eye towards retaining the content and the historical significance of the physical object, and as much of the original materials and structure as possible.  The idea is to do only as much as is necessary to keep the material stable using materials and processes that will not increase deterioration and are reversible if needed.

Michaelle with librarian Corrie Hutchinson.
Chancellor’s Outstanding Staff Award winners!
Ann Campion Riley, Vice Provost and University Librarian, with Michaelle Dorsey.

Cycle of Success: Andrew Ray

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Andrew Ray is a Master of Health Administration graduate student in the Department Health Management and Information (HMI). For his capstone project, Andrew worked to sign up research faculty for ORCID IDs. Part of this project was to analyze those who already used ORCID, and as the project progressed, to see who had signed up after the capstone started. Librarians Diane Johnson and Taira Meadowcroft, and Graduate Library Assistants, Rachel Alexander and Gemille Purnell, collaborated on thie project.

“I was involved in a capstone project with several classmates from the HMI department that involved identifying methods for capturing research productivity. The Health Sciences Library staff not only connected us with resources to do this, they also helped us collect and analyze the data relating to our project. Diane, Taira, and the other staff we worked with were always quick to respond to our requests and eager to provide additional expertise where needed. They are clearly passionate about helping their colleagues across the School of Medicine and related schools. I would encourage anyone with research needs to take advantage of the excellent resources the library has to offer. Our project absolutely benefited from their involvement.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, Staff news Ann Campion Riley appointed Vice Provost for Libraries and University Librarian

Ann Campion Riley appointed Vice Provost for Libraries and University Librarian

The University Libraries are excited to announce that Ann Campion Riley, acting director of MU Libraries, has been appointed to the new position of vice provost for libraries and university librarian effective July 1.

Riley joined MU in 2007 as the associate director for access, collections and technical services and was appointed acting director of MU Libraries in July 2015. During her tenure at Mizzou, she has increased partnerships with other AAU and SEC institutions and has been instrumental in fundraising, including a recent student initiative designed to enhance library offerings and services.

Riley is a nationally-recognized leader with nearly 30 years of professional service in academic and research libraries. She served as president of the Association of College and Research Libraries in 2015, representing more than 11,500 academic and research librarians, and was honored as a research library leadership fellow by the Association of Research Libraries. She is a writer and speaker on assessment and organizational culture in higher education.

Riley was formerly director for technical and access services at Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. She was library director at Saint Louis Community College, Meramec, where she twice served as an acting dean and one year as chief campus academic officer. Other academic libraries where Riley has served in a professional capacity include Maryville University, the University of Missouri-St. Louis and New Mexico State University. She earned her B.A. in English and her M.S. in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois. She has an M.A. in English from the University of Missouri and pursued a Ph.D. in English at Saint Louis University.

Interim Chancellor and Provost Garnett Stokes released the following statement:
"I am confident that she will continue to provide strong leadership for MU Libraries. She is a true champion and has tirelessly worked to support and preserve the library services and information resources upon which MU faculty, students and staff have come to rely."

We couldn't agree more. Congratulations, Vice Provost Riley!

Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & OER Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. They focus on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Resources and Services OER Librarian Chosen to Lead Open Textbook Network Initiative

OER Librarian Chosen to Lead Open Textbook Network Initiative

Cycle of Success Interview with Outreach Librarian, Grace Atkins

Q: You’ve been selected by the MOBIUS Board to serve as a MOBIUS System Leader for the Open Textbook Network Initiative. Congratulations! What does this mean?
A: Thank you! Let’s break it down: MOBIUS is a network of 192 libraries that provides access to shared information resources, services, and expertise. When one of our university libraries doesn’t have a book or other resource, we go into the MOBIUS online catalog and see if one of the other branches has what we need. In turn, we do the same for other MOBIUS partners.
The MOBIUS system just gained membership to the Open Textbook Network (OTN), which provides access to the Open Textbook Library, a set of peer-reviewed, customizable academic textbooks. Over 350 campuses are part of the OTN, and now Mizzou faculty will have access to their huge set of online textbooks that are free to students.

Q: This sounds like a form of OER?
A: Yes, free textbooks are a form of an Open Educational Resource (OER). An OER can be “teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others." To over-simplify, an OER is a free textbook or any other teaching resource/tool that students don’t have to pay for. Which is great, because right now a student at Mizzou currently spends an average of $500—$700 each year on course materials (see May 2017 OER report for more stats).

Q: Why were you nominated for this position?
A: I’ve been the coordinator for our campus’s OER Interest Group for two years, and I recently presented on OER at MOBIUS’s annual conference a few weeks ago. I’m currently working to support the new MU System OER Initiative that Dr. Choi announced today.

Q: How does being a member of the Open Textbook Network support the UM System’s new OER Initiative?
A: The Open Textbook Network (OTN) promotes access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. Founded and run by the University of Minnesota's Center for Open Education, the OTN manages the Open Textbook Library which contains open textbooks licensed to be freely used, adapted, and distributed. With our membership, we now have access to these resources, which provide options for faculty who pursue the MU System OER Initiative.
Of course, we’ll also be working with OpenStax, SPARC, and other OER organizations and discovery tools. With an UM System initiative this big, it’s useful for faculty to have many options when it comes to OER, and it’s even more useful to have a trained experts and librarians such as myself to provide resources, instruction, and support for those faculty. 

Q: So, what is the role of a System Leader in the Open Textbook Network?
A: The Open Textbook Network has what is essentially a train-the-trainer program for new members. As a System Leader, I’ll be trained to train the other libraries in the MOBIUS system, including the libraries here at Mizzou. I’ll be going to a summer institute at the University of Minnesota in August to learn all about how to use and customize the resources and templates in the Open Textbook Library, and then I’ll train other librarians in our MOBIUS system to teach faculty, staff, and other educators on how to use these free resources in their courses.

Q: How does a leadership role with the Open Textbook Network contribute to the libraries’ Cycle of Success?
A: Providing access to course materials at no cost creates a more equitable learning environment for students. When all students can afford to access the textbooks they need, their academic performance and retention improves. If I teach librarians how to teach faculty to use the Open Textbook Library, then the libraries have established a cycle that ultimately results in student academic achievement.

You can learn more about Open Educational Resources (OER) at libraryguides.missouri.edu/OpenEducationalResources

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success: Robert Altenbernd and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Robert Altenbernd recently submitted a story about his experience working with Gwen Gray, our Social Sciences Librarian, during his time in the in the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) program. EBV is a "one-of-a-kind initiative designed to leverage the skills, resources and infrastructure of higher education to offer cutting-edge, experiential training in entrepreneurship and small business management to post-9/11 veterans with service-connected disabilities and a passion for entrepreneurship. The aim of the program is to open the door to economic opportunity for our veterans by developing their competencies in creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture." There are three phases, and Phase 2 is a nine-day residency at an EBV university. All of the participants apply to the program and go through an interview process.  This year, 19 are on the Univeristy of Missouri campus, for eight days.  There are three from Missouri, but participants come from North Carolina, New Mexico, Colorado, Minnesota, D.C., all across the country.  Their business ideas range from nonprofits that will serve post-9/11 veterans to retail storefronts to making apparel for reenactors. This is the second year Mizzou has participated in the program, and this participation was featured in Inside Columbia magazine last year. 


Gwen Gray's role, as one of the 11 EBV librarians around the country, is to be the support person for these participants while they are on campus, and after they leave. "Dr. Greg Bier (retired Army veteran) who runs the program, is a big proponent of the library and feels like too many entrepreneurs don’t know about the resources & services we offer." Phase 2 includes instruction within MU Libraries, and access to a guide created by Gwen. The guide includes information they can only access while here, links to free sites, and also links to the EBV Info Portal that participants have access to one year after starting the program. Gwen also sends the participants home with a handout, specific to each veteran, that includes information on public and academic libraries in their home areas as well as other sources of help to local entrepreneurs. She includes any useful databases and contact information for business librarians and Small Business Development Center counselors. This handout was a big hit during this program's inagural year at Mizzou: "Second, I want you to know I followed up with the small business development center you located near my home. Staff sat down with me and busted out my business financials. It was a lifesaver. I felt much more confident sending sound financial docs to lenders. I've secured land and my loan package is currently being processed. I owe you one."


Robert Altenbrend recently participated in Phase 2 of EBV, and had some kind words to say about Gwen's help:

"I am currently attending the EBV in-residence phase at Mizzou. I was having difficulties finding research data on starting a veteran support nonprofit. Gwen Gray was very helpful and found several resources that will assist with this project. This type of customer service and professionalism should be commended and reflects positive on Mizzou. This is coming from a lifelong Jayhawk who grew up in the Lawrence area:-) Please pass on my appreciation to her. Thank you."

We forgive Robert for his Jayhawk love, and wish him well with the rest of the program! 

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.