Cycle of Success: Gwen Gray, Kate Anderson, and Supporting Entrepreneurship

Gwen Gray
Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Gwen Gray, Business, Economics & Public Poloicy Librarian, spearheads the libraries’ involvement with a variety of programs. Through her work with Entrepreneurship Alliance students, Gwen promotes the libraries as an integral resource for teaching and research. Greg Bier, Director of the Entrepreneurship Alliance, indicates her positive impact. “I just wanted to thank you for working with my Entrepreneurship Alliance students Tuesday,” Bier said. “I think it is very important that they understand the tools right at their fingertips on campus. Unfortunately, not many of them think of Ellis as one of them. I also think you change their opinions. Thanks for being a great help!”

Gwen strives to integrate library resources and services into MU’s entrepreneurship programs. One such program is the Biodesign & Innovation Program. Through her work, Gwen assists Biodesign Fellows as they seek out information and research. The Fellows she works with speak highly of the assistance she provides. “Our Biodesign Filtering presentation tonight was a great success,” one Fellow said. 

Kate Anderson

Kate Anderson is the head of the Zalk Vetinary Medical Library and works with Gwen on a number of projects, including that Biodesign Program and the Coulter Translational Partnership. In Coulter boot camps, teams of physicans and engineeers build their case for funding from the Coulter Foundation. The goal of the Coulter Foundation is to accelerate the translation of biomedical innovations into products the improve patient care.  

Because entrepreneurs need expertise and resources from multiple disciplines, Gwen and Kate collaborate extensively. The biodesign fellows and the boot camp participants often acknowledge Gwen’s and Kate’s teamwork.

  • “I wanted to say a big ‘THANK YOU!’ to both of you for getting us all the information we needed in such a short period of time. You both made the success of [our] presentation possible!”
  • “Thank you so much for checking in with us. It really means a lot to know we have your support!"
  • “Many thanks for your kind help in award.  Really appreciate [Gwen’s] help and Kate’s timely support.”
     


This active collaboration enables the Libraries to have a positive impact on the biotech entrepreneurial climate not only on campus but in the greater mid-Missouri region as well.


If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or workplease use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

Congratulations to the Undergraduate Research Contest Winners!

The University Librareis Undergraduate Research contest seeks to recognize and reward outstanding research conducted by undergraduate students at the University of Missouri.

In First place, and the recipient of a $500 scholarship, is Victor Topouria, a junior in journalism. His paper is titled, “The fabric road to power: geography of the textiles trade along the new Silk Road and China’s path to geopolitical dominance through the textiles supply chain”. Dr. Joseph Hobbs, professor of Geography, supported his submission saying, “Victor provided exceptional insight into the ways in which China is re-shaping the economics and geopolitics of Asia (and the world) through the medium of textiles.”

The Second place winner and recipient of a $250 scholarship is Samuel Mosher, a sophomore in history. His paper, “The suppression of the African slave trade in The Illustrated London News explored how The Illustrated London News, the world’s first weekly illustrated periodical, reported on Great Britain’s suppression of the African Slave Trade from 1842 to 1869. Dr. Domingues da Silva, Assistant professor of African History, supported his submission saying “Rarely have I seen another freshman student make such a complete use of the libraries’ resources to write a research paper. The paper’s quality and originality are beyond question.”

Special  thanks to the Friends of the University Libraries for their support of this award.

Federico Martinez-Garcia Presents on Diversity Standards

Federico Martinez-Garcia, Head of Access Services, co-presented a roundtable discussion (with Tarida Anantachai of Syracuse University) at the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) annual conference in Baltimore, MD, on March 23rd. Both are members of the ACRL Diversity Committee, which is in the process of revising the ACRL Diversity Standards.

Resteering the Standards: Revisiting the ACRL Diversity Standards & Cultural Competencies offered attendees insight into a 2015 survey, which highlighted issues missing from the current standards. Questions the roundtable considered included possible implications of revisions as well as the need for new concepts and terminology. Participants also discussed personal experiences regarding institutional commitment to and changing campus climates regarding diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice.

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

Noel Kopriva Presents on 4-H Digitization Project

Noel Kopriva, Agriculture Librarian, presented a poster at the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) annual conference in Baltimore, MD, on March 23rd. Bringing a Piece of 4-H History into the Twenty-First Century: Creating a 4-H Circulars Digital Collection at a Land-Grant Library was a collaboration between Noel and Felicity Dykas, Head of Digital Services. The poster introduced attendees to scope of the collection as well as the work done to make these items accessible to the public. Noel manages the project, and Felicity and her team digitized and cataloged the circulars.

In 1922, the Missouri Extension Service published its first circular aimed directly at children, the Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Circular. Published into the 1960s, the circulars cover a wide variety of topics, including food and nutrition, music appreciation, livestock, gardening, sewing, posture, and more. The 4-H Circulars collection includes all the issues in the MU Libraries' collection (almost 200, housed in Special Collections and Rare Books) and is freely available in MOspace.

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

Deb Ward featured in MCR Voices

Our very own Deb Ward was interviewed for MCR Voices. MCR voices is a short podcast designed to inform and educate members of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and the general library community, on excellent practices.

In this interview, Deb discusses what she envisions for the future of the libraries as the Director of the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri. Deb mentions the new HSL advisory council, how she encourages HSL staff to help with the mission of the library, and how, even with a budget reduction, the libraries will still present a coherent picture of who we are, and what are our value is to our users in order to be successful. 

 

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

Cycle of Success: Marybeth Bohn, Orthopedic Surgery

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Marybeth Bohn

 

Maryboth Bohn is the executive assistant to Dr. James P. Stannard, MD. in the Missouri Orthopedic Institute.  Marybeth works in the academic office and assists with administrative paperwork. With a tight deadline approaching, and needing the information by the end of the business day, Marybeth contacted the health sciences library to ask for help in gathering metrics for promotion and tenure. Katy Emerson, Library Specialist Sr. in Interlibrary Loan, gave Marybeth some information on the possible metrics she could use for the Promotion and Tenure packet, while Taira Meadowcroft, Information Services Librarian, and Rachel Alexander, Graduate Library Assistant, gathered the metrics. It was definitely a great collaborative effort! 
 

Rachel Alexander

 

"I work in a fast-paced office assisting Dr. Stannard with his administrative work. Much of that includes academic activities such as reviewing P&T packets, writing letters, and gathering articles for research. If it weren't for the help of the librarians in the Health Science Library, I would be in dire straits! They come to my rescue often! They are quick, upbeat, and always helpful. Recently, I needed publication metrics for a P&T review. Two of the librarians stopped what they were doing to help me and speed things along. They also took the time to explain what everything meant. I also appreciate their helpfulness in pulling articles for me when I am not able to access the articles myself. I have used the online request system and their online chat system quite easily and have always received excellent assistance. Don't hesitate to ask a friendly librarian!"

 

Katy Emerson

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, 
please use the Cycle of Success form

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

Meet the Special Collections Intern: Kayla

This semester we have two new interns working on metadata, provenance, and digital projects with us in Special Collections. Last week we introduced Olivia; this week, say hello to Kayla.

Hello!

My Name is Kayla Thompson and I am one of the new interns in the Special Collections department at Ellis Library. I am senior studying English Creative writing with a varied collection of minors. Here are some fun facts about myself:

  1. My dream is to work in either a library or museum working with old books, manuscripts, and artifacts. For this reason, I am applying to graduate school for the fall for Library and Information Sciences.
  2. I love reading. Books are my favorite things in the whole world. At the moment I own somewhere around 500 of them, so old or new you can find just about any genre on my shelf, though, I prefer fiction. Currently I am in the middle of about five books including Homer’s Iliad, Cassandra Clare’s Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy, and Skye Alexander’s The Modern Witchcraft Spell Book: Your Complete Guide to Crafting and Casting Spells.
  3. I am writing a novella about a young witch with no powers. Not quite sure where it’s going yet (if it’s going). I have wanted to write a book since I was 12, but have yet to produce something that I feel is worth putting out into the world. It’s mostly just a hobby at the moment.
  4. This summer I am going on a trip to study abroad in Greece. It has been a dream of mine since I was little. It will also be the last six credits I need to finish my Classical Studies minor.
  5. I own one fat and fluffy cat named Tora.
  6. And I probably drink way more coffee than could possibly ever be good for me.

So, that’s who I am. I can’t wait to get to know more about everyone I work with. I am already having fun and can’t wait to see where this semester in Special Collections takes me.

Be sure to tune into our Tumblr to see posts by Olivia and Kayla this semester.

Meet the Special Collections Intern: Olivia

This semester we have two new interns working on metadata, provenance, and digital projects with us in Special Collections. First up for introductions is Olivia:

Hey! Hi! Hello, my fellow bibliophiles! I’m very excited to introduce myself to you as the new social media intern for Ellis Library’s Special Collections and Rare Books Department. My name is Olivia Mikus and I am a senior here at MU, double majoring in French and English Literature. I hope to become a French educator in the high school, and eventually college, setting. 

Here are some more interesting (at least I hope) tidbits about myself:

  • I am obsessed with all things French, so look forward to (or feel free to skim over) a few interesting French finds, should I stumble upon any, during my semester cataloging for Special Collections.
  • I have two pets, both named after a character or an actor from my most favorite television programs: My cat, Jess, named after a character from Gilmore Girls and my pittie, Topher, named after Topher Grace (Eric Foreman) from That 70s Show.
  • *queue Harry Potter theme* All things Harry Potter, all the time. Need I say more? Oh yeah, #ravenclaw4life
  • My favorite book is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. I read this for the first time in my 12th grade English Comp. course and have read it 3 more times since. That is where my love of classic English literature began and I feel fortunate that I’ve been able to channel that love into a major and, of course, this internship. (Here in special collections, we have an original hand-written manuscript of Charlotte’s and her sisters’ early childhood works. #geekingout)
  • If I could narrow my music interests down to a few groups they would include: The 1975 (Haven't heard of them? You should fix that…go on, I’ll wait), The Beatles, Blink-182 (Fun fact: Blink-182 and I were born the same year, 1992!) and Alanis Morissette, with whom I connect on a spiritual level. #90skid
  • I’m a definite foodie. I love to cook (though I’m no Julia Child) but even more so, I love to eat. Favorite foods? The edible kind, I don’t discriminate. I’m currently teaching myself to cook and I hope to someday start my own foodie blog about myself and my (sometimes disastrous, though always entertaining) cooking escapades. It’ll happen…one day.
  • Wanderlust: I have an unquenchable thirst to see every inch of this beautiful sphere we call Earth before I have to part with it.
  • Lastly, my most favorite movie is Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Love, loss, brain damage, a sprinkle of science-fiction, Jim Carrey, and Kate Winslet with mood-changing hair…Seriously, what more could you ask for?

Thanks for tuning in to A Bit About Me with Olivia Mikus. I’m super looking forward to sharing with you all the interesting texts I find while working in Special Collections. I hope you will find them as interesting as I do!

Watch for Kayla's intro post next week, and tune into our Tumblr to see posts by Olivia and Kayla this semester.

Cycle of Success: Susan Scott, PhD., RN.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Susan Scott, PhD., RN.
Susan Scott, PhD., RN., Manager of Patient Safety and Risk Management in the Office of Clinical Effectivness at MU Health, makes great use of the health sciences librarians. In order for the patient safety standards, and reviews in the hospital to be evidence-based, Susan regularly sends search requests to Taira Meadowcroft, the designated Quality Improvement library liasion, within the Health Sciences Library. 

Health Sciences Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

"MU Health Care's Patient Safety Team is responsible for the review of clinical care events in which the patient experienced harm from the care rendered. Review of current standards of care and matching them with care rendered is an important part of a comprehensive review. In the past, HSL resources have been an invaluable asset to help us with everything from basic reviews of the literature to more comprehensive and detailed literature reviews. Review of these cases in a timely manner is important. I have found the HSL resources as being highly dependable completing thorough reviews with a quick turnaround time. How awesome to have such amazing resources to help complement our clinical resources! Thank you, HSL and team, for helping us provide the safe care to our patients! Your efforts are truly appreciated but more importantly, I truly appreciate your partnership! Please keep up the great work!"

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form

Gemille Purnell headed to Washington D.C.

Gemille Purnell, a graduate library assistant with the Health Sciences Library, recently won a scholarship to attend the Consumer Food Safety Education Conference, January 25th-27th in Washington D.C. 

Gemille was among twelve awardees chosen by the committee of the non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education. In order to be eligible for this opportunity, Gemille had to complete an application, write an essay on how attending the conference would have a positive impact on her professional future, and have a faculty member submit a letter of recommendation. 

When asked why she decided to apply for this scholarship, Gemille said "food safety is a public health concern that often gets overlooked, so I felt this conference would be a great opportunity for me to enhance my professional readiness." 

Congratulations Gemille! 

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.