home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel HSL, Staff news Open Access Week 2018: Documentary Film Screening in Ellis Library

Open Access Week 2018: Documentary Film Screening in Ellis Library

Join us for an Open Access Week screening of the documentary film Paywall: The Business of Scholarship.

Tuesday, October 23
Ellis Library room 114A
2 to 3:15 pm

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary film on scientific publishing business and on the need for open science. It reports on the huge profit margins of the big publishing companies, like Elsevier, Springer and Wiley and the challenges for open science to change the situation. Scientists, science administration, librarians, editors of scientific journals, open access-activists, representatives of scientific publishing houses and the founder of Academia.edu give their opinions on the matter. This film focuses on the need for Open Access in research and science. There will be a 15 minute post-screening discussion for anyone who would like to stay after the viewing.

What is Open Access?
Open Access is a growing international movement that uses the Internet to throw open the locked doors that once hid knowledge. Encouraging the unrestricted sharing of research results with everyone, the Open Access movement is gaining ever more momentum around the world as research funders and policy makers put their weight behind it.

For more University Libraries’ Open Access Week events, check out this post.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Institutional Support Models Could Revolutionize Open Access Publishing

Institutional Support Models Could Revolutionize Open Access Publishing

In addition to “producing grammatical descriptions and dictionaries for four varieties of the Luyia language cluster in western Kenya,” Michael Marlo is an Associate Professor of English and Linguistics and a member of the editorial board of the Language Science Press‘s Contemporary African Linguistics series. Language Science Press is an open access publisher of peer-reviewed linguistics books, including textbooks, and neither readers nor authors pay fees under the Knowledge Unlatched model, which instead relies on financial pledges from institutions and libraries to fund open access projects.

Michael’s editorship originally grew out of a desire to find a financially reasonable publishing outlet for the proceedings of the Annual Conference on African Linguistics. When researching potential publishers for book projects related to his National Science Foundation project, Structure and Tone in Luyia, he had also made note of their African Language Grammars and Dictionaries series.

“One of the major obstacles to the development of the field of linguistics is access to research results,” Michael says. For example, access to the digital version of the most prestigious publisher’s grammar series costs $10,000 plus annual fees for updates. A single book costs $200. Despite the prestige, Michael doesn’t intend to pursue publication through a press with such a prohibitive pricing model because that would limit his audience to those few whose libraries can afford access. He says, “While I recognize that there are still problems of access with publications that are primarily available as PDF downloads online, due to the fact that not everyone has internet access, having my work available for anyone to download is a major improvement in access over most other publishing options, which are either too expensive for readers or require a large subvention from the author, or both.”

Anne Barker

Last summer, Michael learned that Language Science Press was pursuing the institutional support funding model and asked Anne Barker, his subject librarian, if Mizzou Libraries could contribute. He was “thrilled” to learn that some funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities were able to be put toward the initiative. Michael says, “I believe [this model] has the chance to revolutionize publishing in my field, and possibly by extension many other fields in academia.”

Anne confirms, “Librarians have long been concerned that the commercialization of scholarly communication restricts access for individuals and strains library budgets. Changing the traditional publication funding model to provide for more open access is complex and challenging, but the Knowledge Unlatched model is promising. Mizzou Libraries is glad to be able to join this endeavor.”

Michael encourages students to use MOBIUS and Interlibrary Loan to access books outside of our collection. He also encourages students to find their subject areas in the stacks and look around. “There’s a lot of great stuff in there that you won’t easily find just by searching online databases!”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services, Zalk Veterinary Medical Library Effects of therapeutic horseback riding on post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans: Open Access Blog

Effects of therapeutic horseback riding on post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans: Open Access Blog

This month’s open access article features Dr. Rebecca Johnson, PhD, RN, FAAN, FNAP, Professor at the Schools of Nursing and Veterinary Medicine and Director of the Research Center for Human Animal Interaction (ReCHAI). Her research shows that companion animals provide a unique source of social support and facilitate wellness-promoting behaviors. Most recently, she’s been testing the effects on physical activity levels and PTSD of veterans paired with shelter dogs and those participating in therapeutic horseback riding.

Dr. Johnson, and her research team, published in Military Medical Research (MMR) in January 2018. MMR is a completely open access, peer reviewed journal that publishes findings on basic medical science and clinical research related to military medicine. All articles published are made freely and permanently accessible online and all article-processing fees are paid for by the People’s Military Medical Press. It is also indexed by the Directory of Open Access Journals. For more information on the journal, click here.

Effects of therapeutic horseback riding on post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans focuses on the benefits of a 6-week long therapeutic horseback riding program for veterans diagnosed with PTSD. This randomized trial, with 29 participants, shows that those who participated in the program had statistically significant decreases in PTSD symptoms than those who were part of the controlled group who did not participate in the therapeutic horseback riding. Even those veterans who expressed initial reluctance to participate were found to enjoy the therapy in the end.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Monitoring undergraduate student needs and activities at Experimental Biology: Open Access Article

Monitoring undergraduate student needs and activities at Experimental Biology: Open Access Article

This month’s open access article features Dr. Nicole Nichols, PhD., Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences and an investigator with the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. Her research focuses on the central nervous system, specifically the control of breathing in models of motor neuron death.

Dr. Nichols, and her team, chose to use the open access option, which gave them the “ability to provide immediate, open and free access to their work without the standard 12-month embargo that applies to subscription access.” Their article, Monitoring undergraduate student needs and activities at Experimental Biology, was published in the peer-reviewed journal Advances in Physiology Education, which promotes and disseminates educational scholarship in order to enhance teaching and learning of physiology, neuroscience and pathophysiology.

This article was published in conjunction with her responsibilities while serving as the Respiration Section Representative on the American Physiological Society Trainee Advisory Committee. One of the co-authors was also on the committee with her and the other co-author M. Matyas works at the American Physiological Society. Their research “sought to develop and test a pilot survey of undergraduate students to determine how they got involved in research and in presenting at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting, what they gained from the scientific and career development sessions at the meeting, and how the American Physiological Society (APS) can best support and engage undergraduate students.”

When asked why her team decided to publish in an open access journal, Dr. Nichols said, “we chose to publish this article in the Journal of Advances in Physiology Education because the target audience for this article are Physiology educators. Most physiology educators read this journal and, some, may not have access to non-open access journals.” Dr. Nichols is no stranger to open access avenues, as she had previously published the last piece of her PhD in PLoS One “because the study spanned many different fields and felt that it would be best to publish it in an open access journal.” The instant access to information is the reason why Dr. Nichols would consider publishing in an open access journal again.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Causal relationship between hypoalbuminemia and acute kidney injury (Open Access Article)

Causal relationship between hypoalbuminemia and acute kidney injury (Open Access Article)

This week’s open access article features Dr. Wolfgang Widermann, Assistant Professor of Educational, School & Counseling Psychology in the College of Education.His primary research interests include the development of methods for causal inference, methods to determine the direction of effects in nonexperimental studies, and methods for intensive longitudinal data in the person-oriented research setting. He currently serves as an associate editor of Behaviormetrika and the Journal of Person-Oriented Research.

Dr. Widermann, and his research team, published in the World Journal of Nephrology (WJN) in July 2017. WJN is a leading open access journal devoted to reporting the latest, cutting-edge research progress and findings of basic research and clinical practice in the field of nephrology, and is currently indexed in PubMed Central (PMC) and PubMed.

His research in Causal relationship between hypoalbuminemia and acute kidney injury is an update from a meta-analysis in 2010. Since that publication, a large volume of data from clinical studies has been published further evaluating this relationship. This article serves to reevaluate their original hypothesis that hypoalbuminemia is independently associated with increased AKI risk by looking at those newer studies.

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services A new strategy in neurocritical care nurse continuing stroke education: A hybrid simulation pilot study (Open Access Article)

A new strategy in neurocritical care nurse continuing stroke education: A hybrid simulation pilot study (Open Access Article)

The latest article in our open access article series features several University of Missouri faculty and staff:

  1. Robert Bell is a Physician Assistant in neurological surgery and serves as a clinical instructor at the School of Medicine.
  2. Melody Burks is a service line specialist nurse in the neuroscience intensive care unit.
  3. Dr. Premkumar Nattanmai is an assistant professor for clinical neurology, and co-director of the neuroscience intensive care unit.

This research team’s article, A new strategy in noncritical nurse care stroke education: a hybrid simulation pilot study, was published in Electronic Physician in May 2017. Electronic Physician is an open access journal, peer-reviewed journal, that publishes articles in all areas of medical and health sciences. This completely open access journal immediately makes their articles available upon publication, which allows for maximum sharing ability on the new strategy for stroke education this article discusses.

This article discusses a new hybrid simulation approach for education of neurosciences nurses involved in the car of neurocritical care patients. “Simulation creates a learning environment that allows for improving technical and non-technical skills, improving efficiency, practicing rare life-threatening emergencies, and fostering improved attitudes toward teamwork.” This combination of lecture and high-fidelity manikin simulation significantly improved nurses’ understanding and managing of patients in the neuroscience intensive care unit.

Newey, C. R., Bell, R., Burks, M., & Nattanmai, P. (2017). A new strategy in neurocritical care nurse continuing stroke education: A hybrid simulation pilot study. Electronic Physician, 9(5), 4255–4260. http://doi.org/10.19082/4255

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition with empagliflozin improves cardiac diastolic function (Open Access Article)

Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition with empagliflozin improves cardiac diastolic function (Open Access Article)

This month's open access article features several University of Missouri School of Medicine Faculty:

  1. Dr. Javad Habibi, PhD., Dr. Annayya Aroor, MD., Dr. Guanghong Jia, PhD., and Dr. Vincent DeMarco, PhD. are all Assistant Research Professors in the department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism. 
  2. Dr. Jim Sowers, MD., is a Professor of Medicine, Physiology/Pharmacology, Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Internal Medicine, and Director of the Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Division. In 2017, Dr. Sowers was awarded the Samual Eichold II Memorial Award for Contributions in Diabetes from the American College of Physicians. The award recognizes those who have made important health care delivery innovations for diabetic patients or research that significantly improves quality of care or clinical management of diabetes. 
  3. Dr. R. Scott Rector, PhD., is an Associate Professor in Internal Medicine-Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Dr. Rector's primary research interests include the role of exercise training, lifestyle modifications, and pharmacological interventions upon oxidative stress and liver metabolism. 
  4. Dr. Adam Whaley-Connell, DO., is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development. His research interests include hypertension, and kidney disease. 

The research team's article, Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition with empagliflozin improves cardiac diastolic function in a female rodent model of diabetes was published in Cardiovascular Diabetology in January 2017. Cardiovascular Diabetology is an open access journal that publishes research on all "aspects of the diabetes/cardiovascular interrelationship and the metabolic syndrome; this includes clinical, genetic, experimental, pharmacological, epidemiological and molecular biology research." With a high impact factor and maxiumum visibilty of articles due to their open access policy, this journal has a wide and global audience. 

Here is an excerpt from the abstract:

Obese and diabetic individuals are at increased risk for impairments in diastolic relaxation and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The impairments in diastolic relaxation are especially pronounced in obese and diabetic women and predict future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in this population. Recent clinical data suggest sodium glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibition reduces CVD events in diabetic individuals, but the mechanisms of this CVD protection are unknown. To determine whether targeting SGLT2 improves diastolic relaxation, we utilized empagliflozin (EMPA) in female db/db mice.

In summary, EMPA improved glycemic indices along with diastolic relaxation, as well as SGK1/ENaC profibrosis signaling and associated interstitial fibrosis, all of which occurred in the absence of any changes in BP.

 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Dr. Loboa: Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method (Open Access Article)

Dr. Loboa: Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method (Open Access Article)

This week's open access article features Dr. Elizabeth Loboa, Dean of the College of Engineering, and professor of bioengineering. Her research and techincal focuses are tissue engineering & biomaterials, regenerative medicine and wound healing, and stem cells. Take a look at Dr. Loboa's faculty profile to learn more about her role as the dean, as well as her research. 

Dr. Loboa, with her research team, published in the Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Research (JOSR) back in October. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal that encompasses all aspects of clinical and basic research studies related to musculoskeletal issues. JOSR encourages the publication of multidisciplinary research with collaboration amongst clinicians and scientists from different disciplines, which will be the trend in the coming decades. This is why her article is also featured. Dr. Loboa's article is an interdiscplinary collaboration with medicine and engineering. 

Her research in Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method, looked to provide a new method for enhanced cellular infiltration in meniscal allografts. The memiscus is crucial in knee joint function in terms of join stability, and allowing shock absorption, and stress distribution. Their new approach was found to better help better remodel post-surgery, and improve long-term efficacy of meniscal transplantation. 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Downs and Dalabih: The risk of shorter fasting time for pediatric deep sedation (Open Access Article)

Downs and Dalabih: The risk of shorter fasting time for pediatric deep sedation (Open Access Article)

This week's Open Access article features two University of Missouri Faculty. 

  • Dr. Craig Downs, DO., is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Child Health. Dr. Downs primary interest is pediatric critical care. 
  • Dr. Abdallah Dalabih, MD., MBA, is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Child Health. He is involved in clinical research in pediatric critical care and sedatio, with one other study accepted for publication and four others that are in the process of submission. Those four projects will be published by two medical students and two pediatric residents all as first authors. Click here for Dr. Dalabih's faculty profile. 

Dr. Downs, Dr. Dalabih, and their research team published in Anesthesia: Essays and Researches, an open access peer-reviewed international journal by the Pan Arab Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists. The journal covers technical and clinical studies related to Anesthesia, pain management, intensive care and related topics including ethical and social issues.

Their research in The risk of shorter fasting time for pediatric deep sedation, investigates that safety of a shorter fasting time compared to a longer fasting time before pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia. The current guideline, adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, calls for prolonged fasting times. This prospective observational study tries to identify the association between fasting times and complications related to sedation. 

 

Dr. Dalabih took the time to answer some questions we had about open access:

Why did you choose to publish in an Open Access journal?

We selected a journal that is indexed at PubMed so it would be easy to find and that can be accessed all over the world. The journal of Anesthesia: Essays and Researches is an open access journal and is indexed at PubMed with no publication fees, so we elected that journal to showcase our research project.

Would you publish in an Open Access journal again?  If so, why?

Yes, with the increased prices of subscriptions, libraries and physicians are having some difficulty accessing articles they need. This is especially true at countries with poor economies. Open access journals allows those physicians to benefit from the study and will increase the distribution. 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Next time you publish: claim your rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Why? According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights —including copyright — go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Yes. The SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. Learn more.

This open access message has been brought to you by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition.