Open Access: What It Is, What It Isn’t

Find out more about Open Access: https://libraryguides.missouri.edu/openaccess

Six OA myths put to rest

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books New Exhibit! Terrific Tales: From Fairies to Fables

New Exhibit! Terrific Tales: From Fairies to Fables

 

“Terrific Tales: From Fairies to Fables” on exhibit in the Library Colonnade.  The exhibit is brought to you by Special Collections and will be on display July 1st –  August 15th.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books New exhibit! Beyond Words: Visual Narratives from the Block Book to the Graphic Novel

New exhibit! Beyond Words: Visual Narratives from the Block Book to the Graphic Novel

Yesterday I posed a question on Facebook: What do Albrecht Durer, Thomas Rowlandson, Frans Masereel, and Art Spiegelman have in common?  The answer: they all published works of sequential art, which are now on view in our latest exhibition, Beyond Words: Visual Narratives from the Block Book to the Graphic Novel.

If, as the popular saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words, then pictures and words together form an even more powerful tool for communication, expression, and storytelling than either would alone.

The materials in this exhibition are from the Rare Book Collection and the Comic Art Collection. In each, artists and writers have used sequential art to construct narratives that are complex, subtle, sophisticated, and powerful. Rather than presenting an evolutionary history of visual storytelling, these selections allow us to situate woodcuts, engravings, comic strips, and graphic novels in a long tradition of word- and image-making, in order to consider the roles of image and narrative in our culture.

Beyond Words will be on view in the Ellis Library Colonnade May 3-31, 2013.

TAGS:

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Events and Exhibits, Resources and Services, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Papers of Pulitzer Prize-winning Playwright Lanford Wilson in Special Collections

Papers of Pulitzer Prize-winning Playwright Lanford Wilson in Special Collections

We're happy to announce that an exhibition of selected materials from the Lanford Wilson Collection, curated by our colleagues at the University Archives, is on view in the Ellis Library Colonnade.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lanford Wilson made a legacy gift of his papers to the University of Missouri in 2011.  Wilson grew up in Springfield and Ozark, Missouri, and spent most of his life in New York.  He began his career at Caffe Cino, a pioneering Off-Off Broadway theater run by Joe Cino that produced plays by many young, aspiring playwrights.

Wilson wrote plays for La MaMa Experimental Theater Club and the Circle Repertory Company, a project organized by Wilson and three of his associates from the Caffe Cino and La MaMa.  Plays that premiered at the Circle Repertory Company included Talley's Folly, Serenading Louie, The Mound Builders, Fifth of July, and The Hot l Baltimore.  Wilson's plays were critically acclaimed and won several awards and nominations.  In 1980, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Talley's Folly. Wilson was elected to the Theatre Hall of Fame in 2001 and to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2004.

Lanford Wilson displayThe Lanford Wilson Collection includes 53 linear feet of correspondence, manuscripts, notebooks, posters, photographs, and over 100 books.  Researchers can access the finding aid online, and the collection is available for use in the Special Collections reading room.

The Lanford Wilson exhibition is presented in conjunction with a conference, "Angels in Performance: Documenting LGBTQ Lives in Theatre & Performance," hosted by the MU Department of Theatre, April 24-28.  The conference will feature guest artist and award-winning playwright and screenwriter, Tony Kushner. The exhibition will be on view through the month of April.

home Events and Exhibits, Zalk Veterinary Medical Library Snowbound? Access Library Resources from Home

Snowbound? Access Library Resources from Home

Off-campus access to library resources is easy! Start from a library page and enter your Username when requested (e.g., don’t go straight to pubmed.gov, but use our PubMed QuickLink to see all the MU information). You can also use VPN to get into electronic journals and books. More information.

Looking for an ebook in MERLIN? On the Advanced Search page, choose “ebook” from the Material Type box.

Sick and tired of studying?

Everybody who lives in Columbia or nearby can apply online for a free borrowers card from the Daniel Boone Regional Library to download ebooks and audiobooks to your iPhone, Kindle or other mobile device without ever setting foot in the library.

Stay safe and warm!

home Events and Exhibits, Zalk Veterinary Medical Library Smithcors Student Veterinary History Essay Contest

Smithcors Student Veterinary History Essay Contest

Students, submit your history essays! Cash Prizes ($1200, $1000, $800, $500) and possible publication in Veterinary Heritage. Deadline: April 15, 2013

Because History has a lot to tell us about our profession and ourselves.

See the details from the American Veterinary Medical History Society

A chance to win $50 gift card!

The MU Libraries needs your help organizing its website.

Please take 10 to 20 minutes of your time to complete this fun activity: http://bit.ly/WG8rLl

Upon completion, your name will be entered in a drawing to win a $50 gift card to the MU Bookstore.

Thank you for taking the time to participate!

For further questions please contact:

Neeley Current
IE Lab Project Manager
University of Missouri
573-884-2986
currentn@missouri.edu

Giovanni Boccaccio turns 700

Giovanni Boccaccio was born seven hundred years ago in Tuscany, Italy. Special Collections and Rare Books celebrates this important anniversary by displaying editions of Boccaccio’s work as well as that of influential contemporaries and predecessors.

Il Decamerone, 1729, FlorenceBoccaccio made an inauspicious start as the illegitimate son of Boccaccino di Chellino. He was adopted by his father, but along with security and status came the duties associated with being an acknowledged scion of the merchant class. Boccaccio received training in banking and law–both of which he resented– before abandoning both for poetry.

Historiated Initial, Geneologia degli dei, Venice, 1547Though Boccaccio is best known today for The Decameron, he wrote over fifteen works, many of which were valued over The Decameron in his own lifetime. Beyond the passing tides of literary taste, what remains certain is that Boccaccio’s work reflects the uncertainty of his era. Fourteenth-century Italy, with its dynastic wars, popular uprisings, and plagues favored resourcefulness. There were times to cast off the past, and there were times to cling to past models. Boccaccio began writing in the vernacular early in his career with Caccia di Diana of 1334. It is to this phase that we owe The Decameron, a work that has been called the “epic of the merchant class” and "Boccaccio’s human comedy that stands next to Dante’s Divine Comedy." His work would take a sober turn after he became acquainted with Petrach. With Petrarch’s encouragement, Boccaccio studied the classics and began writing in Latin. To this phase we owe the existence of De genealogia deorum gentilium.

Illustration from Tales from Boccaccio, New York, 1947Detail, Geneologia deorum gentilium, Venice, 1494Highlights of our exhibition include a combined edition of De genealogia deorum gentilium and his other reference work, de montibus & siluis de fontibus: lacubus: & fluminibus, published in 1494 in Venice. The Italian translation, Geneologia degli dei, published in 1547, also in Venice, will also be displayed. Other items of interest include sixteenth-century works of Ovid, Petrarch, Dante, and Villani. These include a first edition of the Italian translation of Dante’s De Volgare Eloquenzia.and an edition of Petrarch published by the famous printer, Aldus Manutius, in 1533. We will also display of early twentieth-century deluxe editions of Boccaccio’s Decameron, rated PG-13 for the portrayal  of clerics in compromising poses.

Printer's Device, De Volgare Eloquenzia, Venice, 1526

Branca, Vittore. Boccaccio: The Man and His Works, trans. Richard Monges. New York: New York UP, 1976.

Serafini-Sauli, Judith Powers. Giovanni Boccaccio. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982.

 

 

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Food Revolutions digital exhibit now online

Food Revolutions digital exhibit now online

If you missed Food Revolutions, our exhibition of food- and diet-related publications last spring, you can now view it online!  This exhibition examines our changing notions of healthy eating over two centuries.

The digital version of the exhibit features a video of Dr. Ingolf Gruen’s opening talk, as well as images and links to full text for many of the books we featured in the Ellis Library Colonnade. Food Revolutions was an event affiliated with Food Sense: The 8th Annual Life Sciences and Society Symposium.

TAGS:

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

London and the Olympics

2012 London Olympics LogoThe 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London begin later this month on July 27th. For nineteen days, athletes from 205 countries will compete in 300 events for gold, silver, and bronze medals. Over one billion people watch the Summer Olympics, when it is held every four years. This month, the colonnade of Ellis Library is showcasing both the history of the Olympic Games and this year’s host city, London. As you are walking through the library, why don’t you stop by one of the displays and learn about some of the most memorable moments in Olympics history, or the history and culture of the only city in the world to host the Summer Olympics three times.