home Resources and Services, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Digitized slides from Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library

Digitized slides from Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library

Digital Services is excited to share that about 250 photographs from the newly acquired Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library. A description of the collections and list of contents can be found in the Hiller collection library guide.

This collection is a valuable resource for students’ and faculty’s research. Yueheng Lyu, a spring 2019 history intern, worked with Special Collection and Digital Services to make part of this collection available online. She chose to digitize slides about two cities in China, Nanking and Soochow. She conducted research on the content of the photographs and curated a digital exhibit with some images that she had digitized. A professor in MU History Department also showed research interests in these slides, especially the ones related to the hardship that Chinese people experienced during the Chinese Civil War.

So far, about 370 slides have been digitized and 250 are available in MU Digital Library. We will continue working on digitizing the rest of the slides in the Hiller Collection and making them digitally available, accessible, and discoverable to more people.

Here are a few examples of the digitized slides:

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

Librarians Help Prepare High School Students for College

The Missouri Scholars Academy brings 330 gifted high school juniors from around the state to the University of Missouri Campus. “With a carefully selected faculty and staff, a specially designed curriculum that focuses on the liberal arts, and a variety of stimulating extracurricular activities, the academy enables students to be part of a unique learning community.” One of those stops for the academy is the library.

Last year, the students visited with Rachel Brekhus, Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, who assisted the students with finding primary historical sources and secondary scholarly sources. The collaboration was so successful that, Ben Balzer, one of the Missouri Scholars instructors, jumped at the chance for his science fiction students to attend Rachel’s research workshop during the 2018 session as well as expanding that collaboration to include Kelli Hansen, Special Collections Librarian.

Rachel Brekhus

“Their work with my students was, in short, amazing! I extended my collaboration to Kelli because of how much last year’s students enjoyed working with library resources,” says Ben. Both his science fiction and censorship in literature classes met with Kelli, who provided literary texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries for the scholars to examine. The scholars looked at items ranging from a comic version of 2001, A Space Odyssey to a rare copy of Utopia by Thomas More. Ben found this opportunity provided his students the ability “to see the rich artistic tradition that underpins the literature we read today.” The scholars left their visit to Special Collections inspired and excited to work on their research projects.

Ben sees this collaboration being a regular component of his classes. “I want high school students to gain familiarity with university resources so they will feel prepared to make good use of academic libraries when they arrive on college campuses. Students of literature should also be introduced to the social, political, ethical, and historical significance of the texts they read. Working with research librarians helps students better recognize these broader contexts and how they enrich literary study,” says Ben.

Kelli Hansen
Kelli Hansen

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Celebrate Armistice Day with HathiTrust Books

In honor of Armistice Day, Digital Services and Special Collections added five new items to the HathiTrust. These five items, from the University Libraries collections, offer unique perspectives on World War I.  Each of these is a new addition to the HathiTrust Digital Library.

First, is Democracy and Terms of Peace: An Open Letter to the People’s Council, by William Benjamin Smith of Tulane University. This small book has a large rallying cry to stay the course against the Central Powers.

Missouri and the War, by Floyd C. Showmaker, gives a wide array of information about how Missouri joined the rest of the nation’s call to join the fight against the Central Powers. This item gives farm outputs by cities in Missouri, lists of Missouri war heroes and in what country they fell, as well as a report about a person from St. Louis who discovered a treatment for poison gas.

Included are two pamphlets from the American Red Cross: Our Army and Navy and You and Why One Hundred Million Dollars for American Red Cross War Fund. These pamphlets give a picture of the American home front during the Great War.

Finally, Barney Stone’s Love Letters of a Rookie, is a collection of humorous letters from the author to his sweetheart, Julie. This book includes illustrations by Gordon Ross.

home Cycle of Success, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

Inspiring Inquiry and Discovery Leads to Student Success

This past year, Kate Harlin, a PhD student and graduate instructor, won the Gus Reid Award from the English Department. Gus Reid, having taught composition within this program, donated funds to support an award for graduate students and other instructors who teach exploratory/persuasive writing. The award stipulates that each recipient “should not only be a good writer but an even better critic—one who views the job and self with both discipline and light-heartedness.” Kate applied with materials created from her international composition course, a course that greatly benefited from Kelli Hansen‘s Special Collections assistance.

Kate and Kelli collaborated on an assignment designed so students could choose an object in Special Collections that they wanted to learn more about, generate questions and use as an object to springboard into an exploratory essay. From the get go, this open ended assignment was ambitious, but Kate says, “Kelli was so open and flexible with us that she was able to pull items that got every student in the class excited.”

Kelli Hansen

Kelli pulled a Physics textbook from the 1920s written in Arabic, which one of Kate’s students from Saudi Arabia was able to identify as a translation written by Mizzou professor Oscar Stewart. She also found a poetry manuscript, by Li He of the Tang Dynasty, written in Chinese that many of the Chinese speaking students were thrilled to look through. One of her students even submitted her work for the Mahan Freshman Essay Award and received an honorable mention.

“The best thing about these two examples is that it helped the international students to see themselves as experts and knowledge-producers, which can be hard for any first year college student, but is even more difficult when in a class that is all about a writing in a language that you’re still learning to master,” Kate says.

Kate suggests figuring out a way to incorporate Special Collections in your syllabus and if you don’t know how, reach out to your librarians.Special Collections provided examples that truly inspired Kate’s students and is one of the many reasons why she will continue to collaborate with Kelli for future classes.

“Every semester that I have brought students to Special Collections, I have received feedback that it was a major highlight of the semester! I value inquiry and discovery in the classroom, and there is no better venue for it than Special Collections.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

The University of Missouri Theatre Department presents an interdisciplinary conference titled “Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama,” to focus on Missouri’s own Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Lanford Wilson. The conference will be held April 26-29 at Ellis Library and the Rhynsburger Theatre and features an MU production of The Rimers of Eldritch directed by Dr. David Crespy.

The conference and all the events scheduled are free and open to the public, with a goal to encourage students and scholars to avail themselves of the Lanford Wilson Collection located in the University of Missouri Libraries Special Collections and Rare Books.  Both the production of The Rimers of Eldritch and a new book edited by David Crespy, Lanford Wilson: Early Stories, Sketches, and Poems, have been supported in part through research in the Lanford Wilson Collection. The conference also features onstage interviews and master classes with guest artists Marshall W. Mason, Lanford Wilson’s Tony® Award-winning director; Tanya Berezin, the former artistic director of New York’s Circle Repertory Company, where Wilson’s plays were first produced; Danny Irvine, founding director of its Circle Rep Lab; and Mary Sue Price, an Emmy award-winning Circle Repertory playwright and protégé of Lanford Wilson.

A full conference schedule and additional information can be found on the Missouri Self-Taught conference website.

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books “Tales from the Archives” at Unbound Book Festival

“Tales from the Archives” at Unbound Book Festival

Join University Archivist Anselm Huelsbergen for a panel on creative inspiration from the archives at this year’s Unbound Book Festival.

It’s not all on the Google, you know. For many writers, the archive is still the primary research tool for their writing. This discussion will give a fascinating and entertaining insight into the process, and show how there’s always the possibility of discovering the unexpected (although not always welcome) when you don’t have algorithms and search engines to guide you.

Anselm is moderating a panel that includes authors David Crespy, Julija Sukys, and Jo Ann Trogdon in Stamper Commons, 11:30-12:45.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Events and Exhibits, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama Conference

The University of Missouri Theatre Department presents an interdisciplinary conference titled “Missouri Self-Taught: Lanford Wilson and the American Drama,” to focus on Missouri’s own Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Lanford Wilson. The conference will be held April 26-29 at Ellis Library and the Rhynsburger Theatre and features an MU production of The Rimers of Eldritch directed by Dr. David Crespy.

The conference and all the events scheduled are free and open to the public, with a goal to encourage students and scholars to avail themselves of the Lanford Wilson Collection located in the University of Missouri Libraries Special Collections and Rare Books.  Both the production of The Rimers of Eldritch and a new book edited by David Crespy, Lanford Wilson: Early Stories, Sketches, and Poems, have been supported in part through research in the Lanford Wilson Collection. The conference also features onstage interviews and master classes with guest artists Marshall W. Mason, Lanford Wilson’s Tony® Award-winning director; Tanya Berezin, the former artistic director of New York’s Circle Repertory Company, where Wilson’s plays were first produced; Danny Irvine, founding director of its Circle Rep Lab; and Mary Sue Price, an Emmy award-winning Circle Repertory playwright and protégé of Lanford Wilson.

A full conference schedule and additional information can be found on the Missouri Self-Taught conference website.

Kelli Hansen

Kelli Hansen is a librarian in the Special Collections and Rare Books department. She teaches information sessions in Special Collections, does reference work, and maintains the department's digital presences. Contact Kelli

home Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books, Support the Libraries, Uncategorized Social Media Challenges for Mizzou Giving Day 2018

Social Media Challenges for Mizzou Giving Day 2018

Are you prepared to participate in the Mizzou Giving Day 2018 social media challenges?? Get ready to tweet…

March 14

  • NOON
    Challenge 1: Hide-and-Seek
    Five Truman the Tiger stuffed animals will be hiding throughout the Mizzou campus on Mizzou Giving Day. Find one and post a selfie using #MizzouGivingDay. You could win bonus money for your favorite Mizzou school, college or program.
  • 2pm
    Challenge 2: Draw the Logo
    Let’s see what kind of artists we have in the Mizzou family. Draw the Mizzou logo, and tag it with #MizzouGivingDay to win bonus money for the school, college or program of your choice.
  • 5pm
    Challenge 3: Mizzou Abroad
    From the Eiffel Tower to the Great Wall of China, Tigers represent. Tag your best selfie wearing Mizzou gear around the world with #MizzouGivingDay, and win bonus money to support a Mizzou school, college or program.

March 15

  • 9am
    Challenge 4: Campus Close-Up
    How well do you know some of Mizzou’s iconic landmarks? We’ll zoom in on a photo of something or someplace you’ve walked past every day on campus. Identify it, and bonus money is yours to donate to the Mizzou school, college or program that means the most to you.
  • 11am
    Challenge 5: Show Your Stripes
    Share a photo or video of you wearing your best black and gold. Use the #MizzouGivingDay tag, and win bonus money to support the Mizzou school, college or program of your choice.

NEVER FORGET that awesome moment last year when Mizzou undergraduate Taylor Tutin won $900 for Mizzou Libraries during a social media challenge!! THANK YOU, TAYLOR!

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Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books, Support the Libraries Giving Day 2018: Special Collections Classroom Project

Giving Day 2018: Special Collections Classroom Project

Did you know that Mizzou Libraries Special Collections reaches thousands of students across hundreds of classes and research projects each year? This Mizzou Giving Day, help us improve their learning experience with a new classroom space.

In Ellis Library, the Special Collections and Rare Books department houses rare and unique materials that span over four thousand years. It’s a great place to do research, explore exhibitions, or teach a class.  Last year alone, Special Collections taught 2,200 students across 165 classes! With a dedicated classroom space, they could teach even more students. The Special Collections librarians have been teaching out of a research space, and are in desperate need of a dedicated classroom space.

#MizzouGivingDay is a 24-hour crowdfunding campaign to gather donations for Mizzou projects. Giving Day starts at noon on Wednesday, March 14 and runs until noon on Thursday, March 15.

Please consider giving to the MU Libraries Special Collections Classroom Project. Even gifts as small as $10 are greatly appreciated!

CLICK HERE TO GIVE

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Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.

home Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books, Support the Libraries Giving Day 2018: ULSAC Special Collections Outreach Contest

Giving Day 2018: ULSAC Special Collections Outreach Contest

This Mizzou Giving Day, the University Libraries Student Advisory Council is working hard on an outreach campaign to support the Special Collections Classroom Project.

Every org participating in the contest needs to email their point totals to ULSAC advisor, Grace Atkins atkinsge@missouri.edu by 10am on Thursday, March 15.

Points can be earned 4 ways

  1. Repost/Retweet from the @MizzouLibraries accounts – 1 POINT
  2. Tweet/Post original message about giving $10 to the Special Collections Classroom Project2 POINTS
  3. Send direct ask to someone to give $10 to Special Collections Classroom Project5 POINTS
  4. Participate in the Giving Day social media challenges10 POINTS

Outreach contest prizes include

  • If every org participates, ULSAC will have a permanent meeting space in Special Collections.
  • The org with the most points gets $400 donated in their name to the classroom project and a special thank you prize from Special Collections.
  • And, if MU Libraries is the unit with either the most donations or the most participation, Special Collections will win thousands of dollars in extra bonus funding!

ULSAC is made up of the following joint session student orgs: Association of Black Graduate and Professional Students (ABGPS), FourFront, Graduate Professional Council (GPC), lnterfraternity Council (lFC), Latino Graduate and Professional Network (LGPN), Library Ambassadors (LA), Legion of Black Collegians (LBC), Missouri lnternational Student Council (MISC), Missouri Student Association (MSA), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Panhellenic Association (PHA), and the Residence Hall Association (RHA).

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Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins is the Outreach & Open Education Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries. She focuses on increasing the use of Open Educational Resources on campus, engaging with library users, and marketing library services, events, and resources.