home Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel One Read Discussion…Without the Reading

One Read Discussion…Without the Reading

Join us August 22nd at 1pm in Hulston Hall Room 4 for The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness book discussion. Haven’t had a chance to read this year’s One Read selection? We welcome those who are interested in discussing the book, but need to finish, or even start. Wraps and chips will be provided for the first 25 participants. Bring your own beverage.

The One Read Program, which promotes conversations regarding diversity, inclusion, and social justice through students, faculty, and staff reading a particular book together, is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Univerisity Libraries.

For more information on the book, events, additional resources, and information on the One Read Program, see this guide. Copies of the book are available for checkout in Ellis Library, the Health Sciences Library, the Journalism Library, and the Law Library.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Government Information Knowledge of Sailors’ Wages Enhances Tours of Only Above-Water Whaleback Ship Museum

Knowledge of Sailors’ Wages Enhances Tours of Only Above-Water Whaleback Ship Museum

This guest post is written by Martin Karpa, Volunteer with the Superior Public Museums in Superior, Wisconsin.

My first job after graduating high school was on a ship sailing the Great Lakes. I worked the freighters for four seasons, hauling iron ore, coal, grain, sand and limestone from Duluth, MN, to Buffalo, NY, and numerous ports in between.

It was just within the last two years that projects around the home were winding down, freeing up more time for interests. With a sailing history and fondness of said, I took an interest in the Superior Public Museums, Superior, WI, of which one of the museums is the last-in-the-world above-water whaleback steamship S.S. Meteor. Volunteer efforts with the museums started out with their annual Volunteer Work Weekend held every last weekend in April when people come from across the Upper Midwest to preserve and prepare the Meteor for guests who tour the ship and learn about its history, sailing in the 1890s, the conception of its unique design and the influence this design has had on the present day shipping industry.

The first work weekend on the Meteor only piqued my interests and I wound up volunteering to come every couple of weeks or so to help out with routine seasonal maintenance on the ship. One thing leads to another, and this role in maintenance has now expanded to also being a volunteer tour guide not only for the Meteor but also at another of the museums, Fairlawn Mansion.

My opinion: dedicated tour guides are not given enough credit. These individuals put themselves out there before the general public and are expected to be the resident authority of what they are teaching, able to field any question thrown at them. Guides will learn the tour script, of course, but many will go above and beyond, gleaning all the facts they can about their particular expertise in order to answer even the most unpredictable question as best they can.

Marie Concannon

One such question was, “What were the sailors’ wages at the time?” (referring to sailors in the 1890s). I didn’t know, said so, and spent some time with the individual after the tour trying to find an answer on the internet without satisfying success. This lead to a more extensive internet search later at home, also without much concrete success. Now, I am not an idiot, but doing such specific research is not in my educational background. All of the clicking around on the net somehow lead me to Marie Concannon‘s contact information as the University of Missouri Libraries’ Head of Government Information. With mounting frustrations over negative search results and no better idea as to where to go with this question, I fired off an email to Marie last August, knowing it was a crapshoot . . . a roll of the dice . . . and I hit the jackpot!

Marie responded promptly, and a very pleasant correspondence followed, impressing me with her passion and dedication to her work. It was obvious even across the internet that she is enthusiastic about researching an issue and my hat is off to her. Information provided by Marie has now been adopted and fit into my personal script when giving tours of the S.S. Meteor, giving those interested in this aspect of our nation’s industrial history a better understanding of daily life at the end of the Victorian Era, beginning of the Gilded Age and into the Progressive Era. Being able to offer more detailed information to guests of the museum also gives them a fuller experience, which in turn helps spread an even more positive review of their visit.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to produce and disseminate knowledge that will improve the quality of life in the state, the nation and the world.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Events

The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Events

The following events and exhibitions have been scheduled to facilitate conversation regarding this year’s One Read Program selection: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community–and all of us–to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

 

One Read Discussion…Without the Reading
August 22, 1:00-1:50pm
Didn’t get a chance to read the 2018 One Read book but still want a chance to hear about it and discuss the topic? This is the event for you. Wraps and chips will be provided for the first 25 participants. Bring your own beverage!
Hulston Hall Room 4

A Brief Moment in the Sun Art Contest
Submissions beginning September 1st- October 18th
We want to feature your work based on The New Jim Crow. Submit a poem, mixed media, a sculpture, a painting, a photo; whichever medium speaks to you. Please contact Michelle Baggett for more information.

September 6th @ 5 pm: 13th Documentary
Filmmaker Ava DuVernay explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation’s prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans. After the screening, stick around for a guided discussion.
Ellis Auditorium

July-October: The New Jim Crow – One Read Program Exhibit
An exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade features a timeline showing the increasing numbers of incarcerated Missourians over the past four decades. Key moments in law, the privatization of prisons, and stories of anonymous Mizzou Tigers impacted by incarceration are highlighted.
Ellis Library Exhibit Case

 

The One Read Program, which promotes conversations regarding diversity, inclusion, and social justice through students, faculty, and staff reading a particular book together, is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Univerisity Libraries.

For more information on the book, events, additional resources, and information on the One Read Program, see this guide. Copies of the book are available for checkout in Ellis Library, the Health Sciences Library, the Journalism Library, and the Law Library.

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel One Read Art Exhibit: A Brief Moment in the Sun

One Read Art Exhibit: A Brief Moment in the Sun

The MU Law School and the University Libraries present at a One Read art exhibit: A Brief Moment in the Sun

We are calling for submissions of poetry, mixed media, paintings and photography based on your reactions to the One Read book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

Submissions will be accepted beginning September 1 and end on October 15. Please Contact Michelle Baggett for more information at baggettm@missouri.edu.

For more information, including upcoming events, visit One Read Program, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Gateway Carousel, Gateway Carousel Journalism, Journalism Library The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: One Read Program Exhibit in Ellis Library

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander is this year’s One Read Program selection. The One Read Program is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Mizzou Libraries in order to facilitate conversations of diversity, inclusion, and social justice throughout the MU community. This year’s selection, The New Jim Crow, examines how old forms of discrimination have been legalized through the war on drugs and unequal enforcement of criminal laws.

An exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade features a timeline showing the increasing numbers of incarcerated Missourians over the past four decades. Key moments in criminal law, the privatization of prisons, Supreme Court decisions, and more are highlighted. The exhibit will be on display through October.

For more information, including upcoming events, visit One Read Program, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

Tigers on Incarceration
Several anonymous Tigers share their experiences of having friends and family members incarcerated.

Save

home Ellis Library, Gateway Carousel, Resources and Services, Staff news Higher-Quality Poster Printer Now Available

Higher-Quality Poster Printer Now Available

A new higher-quality plotter printer is now available in the MU Mail & Print Center (Digiprint) in Ellis Library.

The new print costs are $3.75/sq ft for students and $4.75/sq ft for faculty and staff. (Cash, credit, or MOcode only. Printing costs cannot be charged to student accounts.) The Mizzou Tigers enjoy the lowest poster-printing costs in the SEC!

Assistance is available on site. Click on “Digiprint Center” on our hours page for current hours information. If you have any questions about this service, call Digiprint at 573-882-7262.

The old plotter printer will no longer be available after July 29.