home Gateway Carousel HSL, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: November 2018

Overview of Recent University of Missouri Publications in Medicine and Related Fields: November 2018

Each month we provide an overview of University of Missouri authored articles in medicine and related fields as well as a featured article from a School of Medicine author with the highest journal impact factor.

This month’s featured article:

Mechanisms of Connexin-Related Lymphedema”, was co-authored by Dr. Jorge A. Castorena-Gonzalez , Dr. Scott D. Zawieja , Dr. Min Li , Dr. Luis A. Martinez-Lemus and Dr. Michael J. Davis of the Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology as well as Dr. Roger de la Torre of the Department of Medicine. The article was published in Circulation Research (impact factor of 15.211 in 2017).

See the list of publications in medicine and related fields we retrieved for this month: http://library.muhealth.org/resourcesfor/faculty/faculty-publications/nov2018/

*This list is not intended to be comprehensive.

Did we miss something? Email asklibrary@health.missouri.edu and we will add your publication to the list.

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Doctor Discovers Librarians Are On Her Research Team

Doctor Discovers Librarians Are On Her Research Team

Dr. Elizabeth Malm-Buatsi didn’t know where to turn when she wanted to improve her standing as a researcher. As the only pediatric urologist at MU HealthCare, and often called away for surgeries, she had no built-in research team she could lean on. After flying solo for a few months, she found herself on the verge of abandoning projects she was passionate about, frustrated by the research process and unsure how to proceed. Luckily, a colleague suggested she contact Diane Johnson at the Health Sciences Library. Dr. Malm-Buatsi says that initial meeting was absolutely lifechanging

When she first contacted Diane, Dr. Malm-Buatsi was creating an educational flyer to give to parents about newborn circumcisions. In order to provide this vital information to parents about the process, she needed to find the best evidence-based research, but she already conducted a literature search and found no information after several hours of searching. Diane, however, was able to find the information in the matter of minutes, at least that’s how Dr. Malm-Buatsi describes it. “Ever since meeting Diane, my outlook on research projects has changed,” she says, “and I’ve learned to enjoy the process. She makes sure to keep me on track, makes the process easier, and helps me think critically about what I’m working on.”

Diane Johnson

Diane’s assistance wasn’t limited to the patient education project. Dr. Malm-Buatsi was also in the midst of applying for an internal grant related to the urinary microbiome. Diane conducted literature searches and created an EndNote Library, not only adding relevant articles, but also pointing out the most relevant sections of information. “Diane was able to cut the time I would’ve spent on researching in half.” Dr. Malm-Buatsi says the grant proposal was recently accepted, and she expects Diane will still be an integral contributor of the project. Diane has also found several additional grant opportunities for Dr. Malm-Buatsi to pursue.

Two projects wasn’t enough for Dr. Malm-Buatsi, though. She also wanted to assess residents’ satisfaction with and the perceived usefulness of an online surgical training system, including a pre-surgery assessment that allows the residents to set goals and view videos before surgery. They determined the best way to capture these qualitative results was developing a survey. Caryn Scoville, Information Services Librarian, consulted with Dr. Malm-Buatsi, designed the survey in Qualtrics, and distributed it to the residents. Dr. Malm-Buatsi and her colleagues submitted an abstract about their system, and although it hasn’t been accepted yet, she is positive it will, in large part because of Caryn’s behind-the-scenes work.

Caryn Scoville

Looking to strengthen your own research profile? Dr. Malm-Buatsi suggests consulting with your librarians from day one of your project and learning how they can contribute to your research process. “They are so open and I feel I can bounce my ideas off of them,” she says. Dr. Malm-Buasi has also discovered an unanticipated benefit: “Now that I am in their minds, I often receive emails with suggestions or pieces of information related to my projects.Their help has had a huge impact on my career.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services #TipTuesday: Quiet Study Areas

#TipTuesday: Quiet Study Areas

If silence and tranquility are what you need to succeed, this post is for you.

Did you know that Ellis library has designated quiet study areas on four out of five floors?

  • Maps of all the quiet study areas at Ellis library.

Are other students being disruptive in designated quiet areas?

Use our instant message service to request library staff ask students in these areas to be quiet.

If you’d rather call us, just be sure to leave the quiet area first!

 

 

home Databases & Electronic Resources, Resources and Services #TipTuesday: Finding Peer-Reviewed Sources

#TipTuesday: Finding Peer-Reviewed Sources

Finding sources that meet the expectations of your professor may seem like a daunting task. However, Mizzou Libraries provides tools to simplify the process of finding high-quality, scholarly sources.

After you search the main search bar on the library homepage, you can limit your results to peer-reviewed sources by clicking this checkbox:

 

 

 

This way, you know the articles you’re viewing have been peer-reviewed and are scholarly.

Other databases may offer a similar option, but each is arranged and designed independently, so the wording or location may be different.

One more pedantic note–it is ultimately your job to determine the quality of source. If you are unsure, you can always chat with a librarian or come to the Research Help and Information Desk for assistance. We are happy to help!

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Health Sciences Library 2016 in Review

2016 was a crazy year for the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library! Looking back, we did quite a bit, but decided to give the highlights.  Here are just five of our accomplishments, with more featured in the video below:

  1. Began working with the School of Medicine Research Council on an ORCID Researcher ID registration drive. This stemmed from the need to increase faculty publication visibility.  We also began producing a newsletter of new publications from our faculty, emphasizing those publications in the health sciences. 
  2. Librarians combated misconceptions to help increase open access publications. Check out our libguide and our blog to stay updated and learn more about the libraries effort to increase open access and MU Research impacts.
  3. Continue to provide health care information to unaffiliated patrons across Missouri, and beyond, through interlibrary loan.
  4. Converted under utilized faculty space after Ralph Sieli, in our circulation department, inquired about its use. With the faculty member no longer in need of the room, we created an addiitonal study space for our students to use. 
  5. Provided our users access to information.

 

If you’re curious about what else we’ve been up to, you should check out our video

We are so thankful for a wonderful 2016!

home Cycle of Success, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Cycle of Success: Susan Scott, PhD., RN.

Cycle of Success: Susan Scott, PhD., RN.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

 

Susan Scott, PhD., RN.
Susan Scott, PhD., RN., Manager of Patient Safety and Risk Management in the Office of Clinical Effectivness at MU Health, makes great use of the health sciences librarians. In order for the patient safety standards, and reviews in the hospital to be evidence-based, Susan regularly sends search requests to Taira Meadowcroft, the designated Quality Improvement library liasion, within the Health Sciences Library. 

Health Sciences Librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

"MU Health Care's Patient Safety Team is responsible for the review of clinical care events in which the patient experienced harm from the care rendered. Review of current standards of care and matching them with care rendered is an important part of a comprehensive review. In the past, HSL resources have been an invaluable asset to help us with everything from basic reviews of the literature to more comprehensive and detailed literature reviews. Review of these cases in a timely manner is important. I have found the HSL resources as being highly dependable completing thorough reviews with a quick turnaround time. How awesome to have such amazing resources to help complement our clinical resources! Thank you, HSL and team, for helping us provide the safe care to our patients! Your efforts are truly appreciated but more importantly, I truly appreciate your partnership! Please keep up the great work!"

 

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form

Stand Out with ORCID

Now that Research Day is over, remember to consider depositing your Research Day poster in MOspace, MU’s permanent digital archive.  MOspace allows your poster to be seen, and searchable in places like Google.

As part of the process, you’ll be asked to include your ORCID researcher ID number if you have one. If you don’t have one, now is a great time to sign up! Your ORCID number will follow you throughout your career, helping you to claim your work, and stand out. 

Signing up is easy through orcid.org/register

eng_researchers-page-001

 

If you have questions, or would like more information, please feel free to contact the Health Sciences Library

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.

Next time you publish: claim your rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Why? According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights —including copyright — go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Yes. The SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. Learn more.

This open access message has been brought to you by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 

home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Workshops Using Archived Data For Health Care Research Seminar

Using Archived Data For Health Care Research Seminar

Interested in using archived data for Health Care research? This seminar, presented by Marie Concannon, Head Data Librarian at the University of Missouri Libraries, will present on current clinical informatics research that may be applied to patient care. All are welcome, but health informatics students are required to attend.  (CME credit is available.)

 

September 20, 2016

12:30pm-1:30pm

CE705

 

For more information, visit www.hmi.missouri.edu or email Dr. Emily Leary at LearyE@health.missouri.edu or Dr. Mihail Popescu at popescum@health.missouri.edu

Sponsored by the MU School of Medicine, Health Management and Informatics/Biostatistics and Research Design Unit

TAGS:

Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, reference, and marketing for the University of Missouri Libraries.