home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Good Reads Reviewed by Roxane Gay

Good Reads Reviewed by Roxane Gay

Looking for a book recommendation? Look no further than this display near the Research Help and Information Desk at Ellis Library.

Check out fiction, poetry, and nonfiction that merited four or five stars on Roxane Gay’s Goodreads account.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Events and Exhibits, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library Lisa Bartlett Art on Display in the Health Sciences Library

Lisa Bartlett Art on Display in the Health Sciences Library

Join us for a close-up look at science in this showcase by Lisa Bartlett, featuring large-scale life forms painted in vibrant colors.

In the abstract work Science of Trees, the strength and beauty of trees is depicted with the use of bright primary colors and bold vertical lines, the intricate pattern of wood knots, and the interspersed areas of verdant green tones and grayer dappled shading.

Science of Rabbits shows the viewer a vivid strand of DNA carrying genetic instructions for reproduction aligned with a multi-color rabbit, a creature well known for its reproductive abilities.

Zoom in on a green bottle fly with Sciences of Flies. Discover the poetry of the iridescent green body, beautifully segmented transparent wings, huge eyes and angular legs.

These works and more will be on display throughout the Spring Semester. We are honored to have Lisa as our featured artist this semester. Additional works by the artist can be seen at her ARTlandish Gallery in the North Village Art District on Walnut Street.

home Events and Exhibits, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Health Sciences Library Book Display: Thyroid Awareness Month

Health Sciences Library Book Display: Thyroid Awareness Month

January is thyroid awareness month! The thyroid is vitally important to the overall function of the body. Thyroid diseases are often under-diagnosed so it is important to know the symptoms. Learn about the autoimmune diseases associated with the thyroid or check out how to treat hypo and hyperthyroidism. Read the American Thyroid Association’s clinical guidelines for treatment.

Book display highlights:

Depression and your Thyroid, written by Gary Ross and Peter Bieling, looks at the psychological connection between the thyroid gland and emotions. This book, written by a medical doctor and a psychologist, demonstrates the cycle of emotions impacting health and health impacting emotions. This book will help determine if a thyroid disease is at the root of psychological issues and, if so, what treatment options are best suited for you.

Diseases of the Thyroid in Childhood and Adolescence by Gerasimos Krassas, Scott Rivkees and Wieland Kiess examines both the scientific and clinical aspects of thyroid diseases in children and teens. This book looks at how thyroid disease in the mother affects fetal development and the development of thyroid conditions as an infant. Further, the connection between thyroid and autoimmune diseases is explored with an emphasis placed on type 1 diabetes. Overall this book covers pathophysiology, clinical presentation and treatment of thyroid disease.

Check out these books and others today at the book display located across from the circulation desk in the Health Sciences Library.

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Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is a graduate library assistant at the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library!

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits “Travel Near and Far” Exhibit

“Travel Near and Far” Exhibit

Check out the “Travel Near and Far” exhibit on display in the Ellis Library Colonnade through the end of January.

Katie Barthel’s DoodleStation began as a series of doodles created while attending professional training sessions as a CPA. Doodling was a way for her to express her creativity. Her first drawings were inspired by her trip to Australia, and after positive responses and encouragement from friends, she decided to turn those drawings into a business.

Katie Barthel

DoodleStation’s slogan is “Doodling your life, your experiences, your travels,” and Katie loves having the opportunity to brighten somebody’s day with one of her doodles. “Travel Near and Far” features landmarks from some of her favorite places–Columbia, Kansas City, and Australia–as well doodles meant to inspire viewers to explore more in their own lives. 

Katie asks, “What is life if not one grand adventure?”

 

 

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Events and Exhibits We’re Looking for the Best Undergraduate Research

We’re Looking for the Best Undergraduate Research

The University Libraries Undergraduate Research Contest recognizes and rewards outstanding research conducted by undergraduate students at the University of Missouri. Undergraduates in any discipline are invited to enter the contest, which will be judged by a cross-disciplinary panel of librarians.

One $500 scholarship, and one $250 scholarship will be awarded to an individual or group project. The winners will have their projects archived in MOspace, MU’s digital repository.

The research project can be a traditional research paper, a musical composition, a work of art, a video, a web page, or other creative work. It has to have been researched using the resources of the MU Libraries. The project will be judged primarily on sophistication of the research process and the materials used (as documented in the Research Process Statement).

Examples of projects:

  • A set design for theater where the student researched period-appropriate furniture, lighting, and architecture to create the perfect backdrop
  • A documentary film for class that researches the history of race relations at MU using library and archive materials
  • Composition of a piece of music created in the style of a famous composer informed by research into their style, skills, etc. through library materials
  • A business plan for a new company or product showing market need, demographics of customers, patents, design, etc. informed by research using library materials
  • A political science paper comparing the rise of fascism today with that in the early 20th century
  • A parody of a famous piece of literature or any original piece of fiction for which the author did library research for their setting, criticisms, etc.

The deadline for submission of all materials is January 31, 2018.

Questions? Contact Sandy Schiefer at schiefers@missouri.edu

Books to Movies Display

Which is better, the book or the movie? Stop by our display near the Reference Desk at Ellis Library for some pairs to compare.

Several titles on display will be released as movies in 2018–now’s your chance to read them first! All books and movies on display are available for check out.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Day of the Dead and Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean Exhibits

Day of the Dead and Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean Exhibits

There’s still time to check out the Day of the Dead and the Ancient Artifacts exhibits on display in the Ellis Library Colonnade through the end of the month.

The Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) exhibit is sponsored by the Latin@ Graduate Professional Network. The Day of the Dead altar incorporates skulls colored by Mizzou students and pictures, blurbs, and trinkets of loved ones shared by the community.

The Museum of Art and Archaeology brings us the Antiquities from the Ancient Mediterranean exhibit. A dozen glass and pottery vessels are on display, including cups, bowls, bottles, jars, and lamps.

 

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Events and Exhibits “Seeing Material Culture at Mizzou” Exhibit

“Seeing Material Culture at Mizzou” Exhibit

The student showcase for Seeing Material Culture at Mizzou is now on display in the Ellis Library Colonnade. This semester’s Honors Tutorial, “Get Real, Go Places! Let Objects Take You There,” focused on the study of material culture, specifically the opportunities for research that objects and artifacts make possible.

Students interpreted, inspected, and wrote about objects through sketchbook journals, weekly syntheses, and a culminating analysis. The course is taught by Dr. Sarah Buchanan of the iSchool and by campus gallery, library, archive, and museum professionals who belong to the Material Culture Studies Group.

This exhibit features 22 objects created by eight undergraduate students, each based on a class visit to a particular collection.

Student Work on Display

Items on display include a mixed media booklet and a collage depicting horticulture in the Mizzou Botanic Garden, digital art based on a Harriet Frishmuth sculpture from 1920 at the Museum of Art and Archaeology, clay art based on a Beulah Ecton Woodard terra cotta from 1937-38 also at the Museum of Art and Archaeology, drawings inspired by clothing in the Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection and by artwork in the State Historical Society of Missouri, poetry, reflections on letterpress as seen during the Bingham Art Gallery visit, and drawings inspired by objects in the Museum of Anthropology and in Special Collections and Rare Books, among others.

Complementing the student work are two apparel items from the Missouri Historic Costume and Textile Collection and two musical scores from Special Collections and Rare Books.

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Fun Stuff: Comics and Criticism

Fun Stuff: Comics and Criticism

Who’s your favorite superhero? What’s your favorite indie comic? Ellis Library has lots of fun stuff, including comics on display near the Reference Desk.

Okay, okay, we do have some comics criticism mixed in. We are an academic library, after all. Take a look at Wonder Woman comics or learn about the history of this famous character.

 

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Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits On Exhibit in October: Omnia Vincit Amor, the Art and Science of Love

On Exhibit in October: Omnia Vincit Amor, the Art and Science of Love

In conjunction with the 2017 Life Sciences and Society Symposium, librarian Timothy Perry has curated an exhibition of materials from Special Collections on the art and science of love. Love has many faces. Traditionally depicted in art as a rosy-cheeked boy with blond curls, love appears throughout Western literary history in various guises, sometimes violent, sometimes playful, sometimes mysterious, sometimes beneficent. To Hesiod, Eros – the Greek for love — was one of the oldest, and certainly the fairest, of the gods. To Empedocles, Eros was a primal force, battling with Eris (Strife) for mastery of the cosmos. To Lucretius, love was like a festering wound. In the Middle Ages, Dante described God as “the love that moves the sun and the other stars”. But love had also become a courtly ideal, closely associated with concepts of nobility and chivalry. Wherever love appears, though, and in whatever form, it is always as a powerful force in human life and the universe as a whole. As Virgil says, omnia vincit amor – love conquers all.

Omnia Vincit Amor: The Art and Science of Love presents the many faces of love as they appear in the literature of antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. It covers both the theories of love found in philosophy and science, from Plato to Judah Leon Abravanel, and more literary accounts of love, including Terence, Ovid, and the Roman de la Rose.

In a related exhibition, University Archives has brought together items from its collection to tell the story of Scandalous Questions – Questions of Scandal: The University of Missouri and the 1929 Sex Questionnaire.  In 1929, a student project for a sociology class at the University of Missouri created an uproar that echoed throughout Columbia and across Missouri. The “sex questionnaire” as it came to be known was intended to gather data regarding the sociological significance of the changing economic status of women on family life. Its inclusion of three questions pertaining to extramarital sexual relations, however, led to the dismissal of one faculty member, a year-long suspension of another, the ouster of the University President, and the involvement of the American Association of University Professors.

Both exhibitions will be on view in the Ellis Library Colonnade until October 30.

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