Congratulations Grads

Virtual Reality at the J-Library

VR Sandbox all day Monday and Tuesday April 17 & 18th.

Come by the Journalism Library in room 102a and check out all our new VR equipment that will be available for checkout on April 19th!

Homedo

Homido – V2 Virtual reality headset

Use your smartphone to create a virtual reality experience with this Homido VR headset. A 100-degree field of vision delivers a fully immersive viewing experience, and the focus adjustment feature means you don't have to remove your glasses to enjoy your games or movies

Google Cardboard

Google Cardboard 

Bring virtual reality to life with Google Cardboard. Using your smartphone and VR apps,¹ this quality viewer puts the world of VR right in your hands.

Rico Theta 360 camera

You can capture your entire surroundings with the simple press of the shutter button. Enjoy a new world of images you have never experienced before.

Women’s History Book Display

Today begins Women's History Month!

To celebrate, we've asked our Library assistants to put together a display by choosing books that focused on journalist topics, women and stories that fascinated and inspired them most. We'd like to thank them sincerely for taking the time to help us with this! Thank you again, to TJ Purdy who helped us pick out some amazing photography books to give our display such a fascinating aesthetic touch! We are proud of our library assistants and hope you'll stop by to catch their work this month, again!  

Check out photos on our facebook page!

Click on each book to read why the book they picked inspired them. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

   

Photo Books picked by Terrance    

                  

                  

                  

 

Black History Month

We are so excited about the great display of books that our own Student Information assistant, Terrance Purdy put together for us in celebration of Black History Month. Come by and check out all his wonderful choices! 

SaveSave

Resources for Journalism Graduate Students

Starting your literature review?  Make sure to check out the Journalism Graduate Student Resources Libguide.  

Whether you are an online student or here on campus.  Getting help is just an email away.  Contact Dorothy Carner carnerd@missouri.edu or Sue Schuermann schuermanns@missouri.edu to help you from start to finish.  

JAM

What is Journalism Archive Management (JAM)?

Journalists and strategic communicators create large amounts of digital content. What happens to that content after its creation? Will it be discoverable next year? In five years?  

Journal Archive Management (JAM) provides a set of best practices for journalism and strategic communication students to preserve and manage their content long after it has been created.

Learn more about JAM 

Next time you publish: claim your rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Why? According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights —including copyright — go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Yes. The SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles. Learn more.

This open access message has been brought to you by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 

Missouri Photo Workshop – Shattering the Glass Ceiling

The latest Missouri Photo Workshop multimedia project is now online – it’s a wonderfully edited, insightful interviews with five outstanding women photographers/editors. I encourage you to check it out here on Vimeo, and it will soon be on the MPW website:

https://vimeo.com/185179908

It was done by three undergrads – Annaliese Nuremberg, Whitney Matewe and Ellie Cherryhomes.

Check out more about the MPW books that have been published.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14 graduate students receive scholarships to attend digital news preservation event at UCLA

Fourteen graduate students from academic institutions across the U.S. have been selected to receive funding assistance to attend a conference next month where they will take active steps toward preserving digital news.

Each student has received a travel scholarship to help cover expenses to attend the Dodging the Memory Hole: Saving Online News forum Oct. 13 and 14 at UCLA. Students will work side by side with journalists, technologists, librarians and other stakeholders to craft a national agenda for preserving born-digital journalism — content created on a computer or digital sensor.

The forum is an initiative of the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute’s Journalism Digital News Archive with funding from RJI and an Institute of Museum and Library Services Award. Additional support is being provided by UCLA Library, University of Missouri Libraries and the Educopia Institute.

It’s important to make future journalists, archivists and technologists part of the solution now, says Edward McCain, digital curator of journalism at RJI and University of Missouri Libraries.

“It is critical we begin building awareness of the need to preserve born-digital news content today so that future generations will not suffer the looming ‘memory hole’ of lost journalistic reportage,” says McCain. “I’m delighted to have such talented individuals joining us as we work together to save online news.”

Attendees will hear from speakers from organizations including The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and the Library of Congress. Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent Peter Arnett will be a special guest speaker.

The scholarships are being funded by a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant from IMLS. The funding assistance was available to graduate students in the U.S. studying library/information science, journalism, computer science and other related fields.

As part of being selected to receive a scholarship, each student has been asked to propose and complete a project that supports one of the conference goals. They will also pitch their project ideas to the assembly during the forum.

Meet the scholarship recipients

Chris AllmanChris Allman of Charlotte, North Carolina, studies library and information science at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He wants to learn more about how the local news startup Charlotte Agenda is preserving its born-digital news content, and develop additional guidelines for how Charlotte Agenda staff can improve those efforts.

John BerlinJohn Berlin of Suffolk, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, where he works for the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group. His project goal is to improve the Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL) software system by adding a feature to enable users to specify criteria to track news or other content from media platforms such as Twitter. Once identified, this content could then be archived automatically.

Terry BrittTerry Britt of Sweetwater, Tennessee, is a doctoral candidate studying journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. He will write a research paper on the significance of efforts to assure the lifespan and accessibility of local online news content.

Itza CarbajalItza Carbajal of New Orleans, Louisiana, is an information studies scholar at the University of Texas in Austin. She plans to conduct a research project that lists tools such as ArchiveReady.com that measure the ability for a website to be archived properly. She then plans to assess the web archiving readiness of a variety of online news providers.

Jiwon ChoiJiwon Choi of Osan, South Korea, is studying convergence journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She plans to meet with international students from the University of Missouri to explore how to protect online media content and develop  possible solutions.   

Alison GuilloryAlison Guillory of Belmont, Massachusetts, is a library and information science scholar at Wayne State University in Detroit. She wants to determine which technologies have successfully protected content from the memory hole and which haven’t by studying how news saved in a digital format have fared over a 20-year period. She plans to document what she learns in a timeline. 

Matt HellmanMatt Hellman of Austin, Texas, is a journalism student at the University of Missouri in Columbia. His project involves a case study of how the Columbia Missourian photography staff is using open source software to provide access to and create a cloud-based long-term archive for digital content.

Shawn JonesShawn Jones of Virginia Beach, Virginia, is a computer science student at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project will explore the potential relationship between social media sharing of news articles and how quickly those articles are identified by web crawlers as candidates for archiving.

Mat KellyMat Kelly of LaBelle, Florida, is a doctoral candidate studying computer science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His project addresses the need to provide individuals with ways to collect, archive and access news content they perceive as important. Kelly’s work is intended to supplement the large-scale collection work being done by institutions such as the Internet Archive and Library of Congress.

Eva ReaverEva Revear of Puyallup, Washington, studies journalism at New York University in New York. Her goal is to find a way to preserve data-driven news applications such as ProPublica’s Dollars for Docs. She is currently conducting a survey to collect data about news apps so she can devise ways to organize news app archiving systems. Her findings will be published as an academic paper.

Hanna SoltysHanna Soltys of St. Louis studies library and information science at Simmons College in Boston. Her project examines questions surrounding how to create more complete preservation methods that accommodate the complexity of digital news platforms. She will also investigate why current archival practices are struggling to preserve online news content.

Carolina VargasCarolina Vargas of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She wants to reach journalism students with messages that increase awareness of the problem of born-digital content loss and provide options for solving this problem.

Tamar WilnerTamar Wilner of Dallas studies journalism through the University of Missouri’s online journalism master’s program. She seeks to address problems associated with inaccurate and outdated news content by exploring technology that supports online correction methods.

Elizabeth ZirkElizabeth Zirk, of Palatine, Illinois, studies journalism at the University of Missouri in Columbia. She will help author and edit a white paper about the forum outcomes. This will include gathering details about the proposed national agenda for preserving born-digital news, projects proposed by working groups and reports summarizing panels and presentations from the event.

Adobe Software Available on Library Computers

Library Technology Services has an array of Adobe Software available for students, faculty and staff of the University of Missouri. The software includes 

  • Adobe Acrobat Pro
  • After Effects
  • Audition
  • Bridge
  • Dreamweaver
  • Fireworks
  • Flash
  • Illustrator
  • InCopy
  • InDesign
  • Lightroom
  • Muse
  • Photoshop
  • Prelude
  • Premiere Pro

Users can access the software on the Macs in the Information Commons at Ellis, the Health Sciences Library 1st floor computers, the Journalism Lab and the Journalism Macbook Pro laptops. However, the software is not included within Software Anywhere.

This software will be useful for digital storytelling students, journalism students and anyone interested in using more creative software for a variety of projects.