home J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, Resources and Services Dr. Loboa: Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method (Open Access Article)

Dr. Loboa: Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method (Open Access Article)

This week's open access article features Dr. Elizabeth Loboa, Dean of the College of Engineering, and professor of bioengineering. Her research and techincal focuses are tissue engineering & biomaterials, regenerative medicine and wound healing, and stem cells. Take a look at Dr. Loboa's faculty profile to learn more about her role as the dean, as well as her research. 

Dr. Loboa, with her research team, published in the Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Research (JOSR) back in October. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal that encompasses all aspects of clinical and basic research studies related to musculoskeletal issues. JOSR encourages the publication of multidisciplinary research with collaboration amongst clinicians and scientists from different disciplines, which will be the trend in the coming decades. This is why her article is also featured. Dr. Loboa's article is an interdiscplinary collaboration with medicine and engineering. 

Her research in Enhanced cellular infiltration of human adipose-derived stem cells in allograft menisci using a needle-punch method, looked to provide a new method for enhanced cellular infiltration in meniscal allografts. The memiscus is crucial in knee joint function in terms of join stability, and allowing shock absorption, and stress distribution. Their new approach was found to better help better remodel post-surgery, and improve long-term efficacy of meniscal transplantation. 

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Taira Meadowcroft

Taira Meadowcroft is a Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Missouri. She focuses on quality improvement, emergency medicine, and social media for the health sciences library.

The search for sustainable energy in 1869

Continuing our theme of engines, this week's pamphlet is Power without Fuel by James Baldwin, published in New York in 1869.  In this pamphlet, Baldwin explains his attempts to design an engine that isn't dependent on coal, wood, oil, gas, or other combustible fuel. His idea (he wasn't the first to think of it) was a variation on the carbonic acid motor: an engine that would run on a solution of carbon dioxide in water.  Engineers investigated carbonic acid engines as a possible replacement for steam power in the nineteenth century.  While the gasoline engine won out in the end, there are several turn-of-the-century patents for carbonic acid motors in the United States and Europe.  Today, we'd probably say that Baldwin was attempting to develop alternative energy, an endeavor which is one of the University of Missouri's four strategic research areas

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