home Resources and Services, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books Digitized slides from Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library

Digitized slides from Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library

Digital Services is excited to share that about 250 photographs from the newly acquired Hiller Collection are now available in MU Digital Library. A description of the collections and list of contents can be found in the Hiller collection library guide.

This collection is a valuable resource for students’ and faculty’s research. Yueheng Lyu, a spring 2019 history intern, worked with Special Collection and Digital Services to make part of this collection available online. She chose to digitize slides about two cities in China, Nanking and Soochow. She conducted research on the content of the photographs and curated a digital exhibit with some images that she had digitized. A professor in MU History Department also showed research interests in these slides, especially the ones related to the hardship that Chinese people experienced during the Chinese Civil War.

So far, about 370 slides have been digitized and 250 are available in MU Digital Library. We will continue working on digitizing the rest of the slides in the Hiller Collection and making them digitally available, accessible, and discoverable to more people.

Here are a few examples of the digitized slides:

home Resources and Services Celebrate National Poetry Month with MOspace

Celebrate National Poetry Month with MOspace

April is National Poetry Month. Celebrate with MOspace! MOspace includes audio recordings of poets reading their poetry. Here are a few podcasts from The Missouri Review to get you started.

home Databases & Electronic Resources Celebrating Women’s Contributions in the Workforce

Celebrating Women’s Contributions in the Workforce

Celebrate Women’s History Month by exploring women’s contributions in the workforce through MOspace. Here are a few items to get you started:

Women and the newspaper (1924)

Women in the laundry industry in Columbia (1915)

As equals and as sisters : feminism, the labor movement, and the Women’s Trade Union League of New York (1980)

Sisterhood as strategy : the collaborations of American women artists in the gilded age (2018)

home Databases & Electronic Resources New Additions in MOspace Show MU Campus in 1903

New Additions in MOspace Show MU Campus in 1903

A few recent additions in MOspace throw us back to the year of 1903 at the University of Missouri.

A map in the 1903 course catalog shows the locations of buildings on campus. The campus has grown significantly since then!

The Bulletin of the University of Missouri, July 1903 is illustrated with photographs of campus buildings, including those below.

Read Hall, opened in September 1903, was the first dormitory for women at the University of Missouri. “The rooms in Read Hall are single and in suites, and are furnished with single bed, chiffonier, washstand, study table and two chairs for each occupant.” To find out more about other early dormitories and fraternity houses on campus, check out Student homes of the University of Missouri.

Other useful sites:

MU in Brick and mortar

MU map collection in MOspace

Happy National Pancake Day!

National Pancake Day, March 5th, is again upon us. Planning an elaborate breakfast to celebrate? Thankfully, publications by the University of Missouri Extension in MOspace are here to lend a hand with recipes and pointers. Here are some tips from “It’s Party Time.”

  • Bake until bubbles appear at the edges of the cake. Turn only once.
  • A slightly lumpy batter makes the lightest pancakes.
  • The cakes will have a better appearance if all the batter to be used in one cake is poured at once. “Spooning it out” in small portions is messy.

For more tips and for recipes, visit MOspace to check out “It’s Party Time,” and other publications related to pancakes and all types of foods for all diets and seasons.

Note: MOspace is an archive for University of Missouri Extension publications. Visit the MU Extension site for the most up-to-date information and publications.

home Databases & Electronic Resources Digital Services Looks Back at 2018

Digital Services Looks Back at 2018

Digital Services at the University Libraries was a busy time for us in 2018. We worked with MU students, faculty and staff to add their works to MOspace, the online institutional repository for MU. We managed MOspace by making those resources widely available to researchers around the world.

We juggled a lot of projects with the goal of providing online access to useful resources. One of our projects was to digitize and make unique and special materials in our library collections available in the MU Digital Library and the HathiTrust, a digital library with content from research libraries and others.

See below for a sample of the projects we completed last year that we are excited to show off to the community.

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Partnerships enrich the resources within our institutional repositories.

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The MU Libraries are partnering with the HathiTrust to build a digital library of freely available resources.

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Digitized MU course catalogs and maps are available in MOspace.

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Digital Services staff presented at the annual Missouri Library Association conference.

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MOspace is the home of all theses and dissertations by MU students since 2006.

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Digitization of United States government documents is making these items easily accessible.

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We continue to value the work of our students and staff.

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Digital Services ensures permanent access to Center for Studies in Oral Tradition materials.

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New scanning equipment helped with productivity.

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MOspace turned 10 in 2018.

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Trudy the Tiger made her Instagram debut.

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Digital Services news can be found at http://library.missouri.edu/news/.

Find out more:

Celebrate Armistice Day with HathiTrust Books

In honor of Armistice Day, Digital Services and Special Collections added five new items to the HathiTrust. These five items, from the University Libraries collections, offer unique perspectives on World War I.  Each of these is a new addition to the HathiTrust Digital Library.

First, is Democracy and Terms of Peace: An Open Letter to the People’s Council, by William Benjamin Smith of Tulane University. This small book has a large rallying cry to stay the course against the Central Powers.

Missouri and the War, by Floyd C. Showmaker, gives a wide array of information about how Missouri joined the rest of the nation’s call to join the fight against the Central Powers. This item gives farm outputs by cities in Missouri, lists of Missouri war heroes and in what country they fell, as well as a report about a person from St. Louis who discovered a treatment for poison gas.

Included are two pamphlets from the American Red Cross: Our Army and Navy and You and Why One Hundred Million Dollars for American Red Cross War Fund. These pamphlets give a picture of the American home front during the Great War.

Finally, Barney Stone’s Love Letters of a Rookie, is a collection of humorous letters from the author to his sweetheart, Julie. This book includes illustrations by Gordon Ross.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

An Open Education Pioneer Continues Helping Students

To Dr. William Krause, education needs to be open and without borders. “We should share information. Not hold it for a select few to access.”

Since the beginning of his Mizzou career in 1971, Dr. Krause has been a proponent of helping students learn and giving them the resources they need. “I’ve always felt very strongly that any student, under my tutelage, should have all their materials provided for them.” He even went as far as writing a couple of textbooks, streamlining them to fit the educational needs of the medical students and taking the extra step to find a publisher to make the textbooks as cheap as possible.

For several years, Dr. Krause taught 96 medical students anatomy and histology. “It was very difficult for me to rotate to all the groups in the labs and answer their questions about the slides. [They] would get frustrated waiting to get my help,” says Dr. Krause. Wanting to make sure his students received the help they needed, he applied for and was awarded a grant to work with a multi-headed microscope for help sessions. With this new equipment, he could easily show this large group the slides. “After three or four years of doing this, even those sessions became too crowded. Everyone wanted the extra help.” Dr. Krause knew he had to find a better way to help his students. When a new chair of the department came on board, Dr. Krause took the opportunity to pitch the chair his new idea.

Screenshot of Dr. Krause’s Blood and Bone Marrow Video

“I wanted to place a camera in the eye piece of the microscope and record me narrating and using the electronic pointer in real time.” The new chair was sold on the idea and gave him the go ahead to buy and use any equipment he needed to create these videos. Dr. Krause developed a set of 24 video tutorials and provided DVD copies for each medical student. That’s a total of 2,304 DVDs per year, mostly out of his own pocket. Eventually, it became too expensive to continue making copies, not to mention the DVDs would damage over time. Dr. Krause turned to the library and asked how could he still provide access to these videos while finding cheaper means of doing so.

Diane Johnson at the Health Sciences Library suggested adding them to Google as it was new and could handle 96 students watching 24 videos. Once placed on Google, Dr. Krause started receiving notes of gratitude not only from his students, but from students all over the world thanking him for sharing his knowledge. After a few years, Google wanted Dr. Krause to shorten the videos. Dr. Krause felt that shortening them would make the videos less helpful. Once again, he turned to the library.

Wanting to keep the integrity of the videos, while still keeping freely available, Dr. Krause consulted with Diane Johnson about how best to proceed. She suggested the new repository the library was managing: MOSpace. Following her advice, Dr. Krause added the videos, along with accompanying educational pdfs, to MOSpace. “I was happy to add to MOSpace. It gives the opportunity for people to tap into information from anywhere and makes it more universal,” explains Dr. Krause.

Top Countries by Downloads from April 2018-October 2018

Dr. Krause, while retired now, still continues to help students here at Mizzou and all over the world. With a total of 4,053 views for the videos and close to 19,000 views for the educational pdfs, users are still finding Dr. Krause’s collection. During the month of September 2018, his videos were downloaded over 800 times.

Dr. Krause cannot be more excited about the open education movement at Mizzou. He may have missed the initiative by three years, but he is happy to know that things are changing on campus. “I am delighted I’ve been able to help so many people from so many areas. This is such a tremendous avenue to make material available in the easiest format possible for our students at [little to] no cost.”

Dr. Krause’s videos, blogs and textbooks are found in MOSpace, where they are free to view and download.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Staff news MOspace to Include Digital Object Indentifiers

MOspace to Include Digital Object Indentifiers

MOspace, the University of Missouri institutional repository, will soon include DOIs. DOIs – Digital Object Identifiers – offer a persistent way to reference and access online documents.  Style guides, such as APA, require that DOIs be included in citations when they are available.

Assigning DOIs to items in MOspace will be advantageous for authors and researchers.  Authors will have a widely recognized identifier for their works.  Researchers will have a persistent way to cite and access MOspace items of interest to them.

This positive development for MOspace was made possible thanks to the advocacy of our librarians, exploration by MOspace staff, and approval and support from library administration.

 

home Staff news DSpace Community Annual Report 2017-July 2018 Now Available

DSpace Community Annual Report 2017-July 2018 Now Available

The DSpace Community Annual Report 2017-July 2018 is now available.  MOspace uses DSpace repository platform.

The Report provides an overview of the user community, membership, two brief community profiles, a technical overview, governance, finance, and events.  In this report you can learn more about the DSpace community, current initiatives, and progress towards the release of DSpace 7.  Members of the DSpace community helped in developing this report: Terry Brady (Georgetown University Library); Claudio Cortese (4Science); Tim Donohue (DuraSpace); Felicity Dykas (University of Missouri Libraries); Valorie Hollister (DuraSpace); Salwa Ismail (Georgetown University Library); (Mariya Maistrovskaya (University of Toronto Libraries); Michele Mennielli (DuraSpace); Carol Minton Morris (DuraSpace); Kristi Searle (DuraSpace); Samu Viita (National Library of Finland).

DSpace is a community-based, open source project that produces the DSpace repository platform. With a 16-year history, strong membership support, and active participation from a wide variety of stakeholder institutions located all over the world 2017-2018 was a year of progress toward the key community priority of developing and releasing DSpace 7 with a new, single Angular user interface and enhanced REST API.  The technical roadmap for 2017 is focused on DSpace 7 development. As a production repository DSpace needs to meet the needs of large and small stakeholder institutions, so minor updates have been released as needed. At the same time the bulk of technical efforts were focused on DSpace 7 which included a great deal of groundwork and foundation support for the new REST API. Plans for a Beta release of DSpace 7 with support for entities are on track for early 2019.  Building and sustaining a strong community is a central goal for the DSpace Project.