home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Avoiding Plagiarism Is Less Daunting after Library Instruction

Debbie Parker, instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, pinpoints a key challenge for international students: “Avoiding plagiarism is a daunting task for all students, but it is complicated by the fact that international students have different ideas about what is expected when using support in papers or presentations.”

A major assessment of the Intensive English Program’s students’ mastery of academic English is a formal speech using PowerPoint. This speech must incorporate research and requires students to produce a bibliography. Debbie took her colleague Mary Browning’s advice and contacted Cindy Cotner, the librarian for international students, to set up an instruction session about avoiding plagiarism.

Cindy immediately thought of LibWIS, a series of library workshops for international students. Two of Ellis Library’s Graduate Reference Assistants, Haley Gillilan and Victoria Knight, had recently taught a workshop on just this topic. Planning and teaching workshops is just part of the professional-level training and experience Haley and Victoria receive as GRAs while they complete their degrees in library science. They also provide research assistance in person at the Research Help and Information Desk as well as online through our chat service and assist librarians with other projects.

Haley Gillilan
Haley Gillilan

Cindy suggested that Haley and Victoria teach the session since they had already prepared a lesson on plagiarism specifically for international students. She says, “I am grateful that Debbie granted permission for our graduate students to teach in her classroom. Her students were engaged and asked good questions, and I think this activity was a learning experience for all!”

The instruction session went beyond a dry summary of “how to cite sources in academic classes without plagiarizing.” As part of Haley and Victoria’s presentation, they assessed students’ understanding using example citations. Debbie explains, “They asked the students to guess which ones were correct. If it wasn’t acceptable, the students needed to explain what was wrong with it.”

Learning about plagiarism and potential consequences from current students beholden to the same university standards of academic integrity helped reinforce the message in a unique way. Debbie says, “It also made it easier for me to reinforce the importance of citing their sources because I could refer back to the visit and remind them about the presentation that they heard.”

Victoria Knight
Victoria Knight

Victoria and Haley benefited from the opportunity to modify a workshop they’d taught before for use in an individual classroom. Victoria says, “Plagiarism is such a big topic and can differ so greatly from country to country. It was an amazing opportunity to get to take one of our library sessions out into the actual classroom. I think it was really beneficial, and it was a fun class to teach.” Haley sums it up well: “I hope that the class helped them with their academic success at Mizzou!”

Debbie wants all students, especially international students, to know that “the library offers so much more than just books.” A former student worker in Ellis Library, she says, “Librarians are an under-tapped resource which can save faculty, staff and students time and energy. The resources and the workshops can make the students’ learning experience much fuller.”

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Workshops LibWIS Wednesday, March 14: Research Strategies, Part 2

LibWIS Wednesday, March 14: Research Strategies, Part 2

Research Strategies, Part 2
March 14
3:15-4:15 pm
Ellis Library Room 4D11

Discover which library resources are best for YOUR specific research. Learn time-saving tips for effective searching to find the research articles, reports, and other materials you need.

For more information on LibWIS, see the Spring 2018 schedule.

home Cycle of Success, Ellis Library Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

Zotero Proves to Be Valuable Research Tool for International Students

This guest post is written by Mary Browning, Instructor at the Center for English Language Learning.

In the fall of 2017, Cindy Cotner, the liaison between Ellis Library and MU international students, and I collaborated on two workshops designed to teach students in my classes about Zotero, an online tool that helps students research, collect, and cite their sources. As an instructor at the Center for English Language Learning, I am interested in discovering ways to enhance the academic experience of international students for whom English is a non-native language. Last fall, Cindy offered a Zotero workshop for 11 of my advanced students who were studying English full-time at the Intensive English Program and 25 international students who were taking my SSC 1150 College Success Seminar at MU.

Mary Browning, Na (Sabrina) Hu, Tianyu (Michael) Bai, and Kazuya Suzuki

During each workshop, Cindy patiently led the students through a progression of steps that allowed them to achieve sufficient mastery to be able to go back to their classrooms and seamlessly use Zotero in subsequent writing assignments. Because of the challenges that many international students face when studying in a non-native language, workshops offered by Ellis Library can greatly enhance their academic experience while at MU.

The Zotero workshop was a definite success: students in both of my classes were able to immediately apply the knowledge and skills they learned in Cindy’s workshop to their academic classes. They reported using Zotero to develop a personal library of relevant research sources, to access this information in real time by incorporating in-text citations while writing their essay drafts, and to create a reference page for their research essays in several strokes.

Mary Browning, Yudi (Gloria) Si, and Junjie (Betty) Qin

I’d advise any MU student, especially international students, to check out and then attend one or many of the workshops offered by Ellis Library to discover tips and techniques to use while researching and writing essays and completing other assignments. MU faculty who are interested in learning more about ways to collaborate with the library, should contact their subject librarian. Cindy is the contact for support of international students.

Mary Browning and Yiqing (Sybil) He

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Ellis Library, Workshops LibWIS Wednesday, March 7: Open Lab

LibWIS Wednesday, March 7: Open Lab

LibWIS Open Lab
March 7
3:15-4:15 pm
Ellis Library Room 4D11

This open lab is a come-and-go session to help you with any library or research questions you have.

Bring in your assignments and questions, and library staff will be on hand to assist you as needed.

For more information on LibWIS, see the Spring 2018 schedule.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Government Information Volunteer Income Tax Assistance at Ellis Library

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance at Ellis Library

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
Tuesdays February 27 – April 17, 2018 (except March 27)
3:00-7:00 pm
Ellis Library Colonnade

Volunteers will be available to assist with do-it-yourself income tax preparation and e-filing for federal and state income tax returns. This service is available to U.S. citizens and resident aliens without treaty benefits on a first-come, first-served basis until maximum capacity is reached.

You will use software to self-prepare your return. Volunteers will be on hand to answer questions and help with tax or software issues. Volunteers have passed an IRS certification exam covering many aspects of tax law as it relates to tax preparation.

Details on what to bring with you, full-service assistance locations, and additional information can be found on the 2018 VITA flyer.

This program is sponsored by the Personal Financial Planning Department, MU School of Law, and the University of Missouri Extension. Questions? Call (573) 882-2173.

 

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits, Resources and Services Visual Artists Who Inspire Eve L. Ewing: Book Display in Ellis Library

Visual Artists Who Inspire Eve L. Ewing: Book Display in Ellis Library

Dr. Eve L. Ewing, writer, artist, and scholar, will give a reading at Mizzou on Tuesday, February 27th as part of Black History Month 2018. On her Goodreads author page, she answers a question about her main influences with a list of writers and visual artists who have influenced her “in terms of not only style, but what it means to live as a writer in the world.”

On display now near the Research Help and Information Desk at Ellis Library are books about the five visual artists Ewing names as influences. Take a look at the work of photographer Carrie Mae Weems or Kerry James Marshall, known for his large paintings. If you enjoy installations, check out Glenn Ligon‘s neon works or Dan Flavin‘s work featuring fluorescent light bulbs. Perhaps you will be moved to learn about Kara Walker and other contemporary working artists.

 

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

I am a Research and Instruction Librarian with a background in creative writing.

home Ellis Library, Workshops LibWIS Wednesday, Feb. 28: Using Google for Research

LibWIS Wednesday, Feb. 28: Using Google for Research

Using Google for Research
February 28
3:15-4:15 pm
Ellis Library Room 4D11

How is the best way to use Google for research purposes?  What is Google Scholar, and how does it differ from the various research databases in the Libraries? What are other features in Google that can assist me as a student?

We encourage you to bring your own laptop to this session. We will show you how to adjust your Google settings to locate Mizzou resources more easily.

For more information on LibWIS, see the Spring 2018 schedule.

John Tinney McCutcheon Editorial Cartoons

The University of Missouri Digital Library contains a wealth of treasures, all freely available to anyone around the world online. One of the newest treasures is the John Tinney McCutcheon Editorial Cartoons collection.

John Tinney McCutcheon (1870-1949) is known as “the Dean of Cartoonists.” He traveled widely and frequently served as a correspondent during those journeys. For example, during the Spanish-American War, he was embedded with the U.S.S. McCulloch in the Philippines. McCutcheon was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1931 for his cartoon “A Wise Economist Asks a Question” and spoke at Journalism Week here at Mizzou in 1939.

Most of the editorial cartoons in this collection are original pen and ink drawings done for the Chicago Tribune between 1903 and 1944. Social issues, economics, politics, the Great Depression, and both World Wars are just a few of the subjects McCutcheon’s cartoons speak to. Click on any of the images below to enter the Digital Library and find out more information about the cartoon.

City Pigeons
New Members of the Club
New Members of the Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why the U.S. Must Be Strictly Neutral
An Exciting Finish to the Missouri Senatorial Race
An Exciting Finish to the Missouri Senatorial Race

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The originals are located in Special Collections in Ellis Library, thanks to a generous donation from McCutcheon’s widow, Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon, in 1955. For those outside of Columbia, though, the Digital Library makes the collection available to anyone with an Internet connection.

Keep your eye on this digital collection. More images will be uploaded and additional information added soon. Additional details and a collection inventory can be found in the online guide on the Special Collections website.

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home Cycle of Success, Databases & Electronic Resources, Ellis Library Curriculum on Missouri Trees Finds Worldwide Audience through MOspace

Curriculum on Missouri Trees Finds Worldwide Audience through MOspace

The University of Missouri has long been a partner and sponsor of activities offered by Missouri River Relief, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to connecting people to the Missouri River.  Now MOspace, the University of Missouri’s online repository, is partnering with Missouri River Relief to offer curriculum material to K-12 schools in Missouri. Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms: A Guide for Students is the first of these materials. Two Mizzou students assisted with its creation.

Missouri River Relief has removed 876 tons of trash from the river with the help of 23,000 volunteers over the past 16 years and has also reached 18,000 students through interdisciplinary and experiential educational events. Kristen Schulte, Missouri River Relief’s Education Coordinator, says these events are designed to “engage students’ innate sense of wonder and natural curiosity. We believe this approach inspires community engagement, academic achievement, and a sense of stewardship.”

Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms is not a foolproof taxonomic tree ID guide but instead a guide for a hands-on learning experience for elementary through high school students. It focuses on Missouri River floodplain trees’ bark rather than leaves, a unique approach to teaching and learning tree species. Many Missouri River floodplain trees are very tall with leaves out of reach, while tree bark is at the student level.

Kristen Schulte

Kristen knew that more young people would learn about Missouri River floodplain trees through this method if the guide were freely available online. As a graduate student at the University of Wyoming, she worked on Yellowstone Youth Conservation Corps Resources Education Curriculum, seventeen lessons designed for the youth employed in the program. The curriculum is housed in the Wyoming Scholars Repository, which tracks how many times it has been downloaded. “When I started working for Missouri River Relief,” Kristen says, “I knew that we wanted to have a similar curriculum for the Missouri River, and it would be helpful to have the statistical information of the downloads, which we are not able to capture on our website. So I reached out to Noël and Felicity and they were supportive of the idea.”

Felicity Dykas, Head of Digital Services, saw the collection as a good fit for MOspace, and Noël Kopriva, Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Librarian, agreed. Felicity says, “One of our goals for MOspace is to preserve research and scholarship and to make these resources available to the Mizzou community and others worldwide.”

The reach of Common Trees of the Missouri River Bottoms has truly been international. It was added to MOspace in August 2017, and Felicity shares that “It’s already been downloaded more than 400 times, including by people in China, France, Serbia, and the United Kingdom, among other countries.”

Missouri River Relief is developing additional resources to be uploaded to MOspace, including Missouri River Curriculum, Missouri River Information Packets, and Missouri River STEM Challenges.

Cycle of Success is the idea that libraries, faculty, and students are linked; for one to truly succeed, we must all succeed. The path to success is formed by the connections between University of Missouri Libraries and faculty members, between faculty members and students, and between students and the libraries that serve them. More than just success, this is also a connection of mutual respect, support, and commitment to forward-thinking research.

Although the Cycle of Success typically focuses on the relationships among the Libraries, faculty, and students, the Libraries also contribute to the success of all the communities Mizzou serves. The Libraries are an integral part of Mizzou’s mission “to provide all Missourians the benefits of a world-class research university.”

If you would like to submit your own success story about how the libraries have helped your research and/or work, please use the Cycle of Success form.

home Ellis Library, Workshops LibWIS Wednesday, Feb. 21: Open Lab

LibWIS Wednesday, Feb. 21: Open Lab

LibWIS Open Lab
February 21
3:15-4:15 pm
Ellis Library Room 4D11

This open lab is a come-and-go session to help you with any library or research questions you have.

Bring in your assignments and questions, and library staff will be on hand to assist you as needed.

For more information on LibWIS, see the Spring 2018 schedule.