home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits Drop-In Ellis Library Tours

Drop-In Ellis Library Tours

Curious about the library? Stop by Ellis Library for drop-in tours this weekend (August 18-20). Tours start on the hour.

Friday: 10 am – 4 pm

Saturday: 1 – 4 pm

Sunday: 1 – 4 pm

Meet on the first floor inside the North Entrance off of Lowry Mall. A tour guide will be waiting.

No registration or appointments are needed. Parents and family members are encouraged to attend as well.

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

home Gateway Carousel, Workshops Fridays @ the Library Workshops Fall 2017

Fridays @ the Library Workshops Fall 2017

Join Mizzou Libraries for our Fridays @ the Library Workshops this fall.
RESEARCH SMARTER, NOT HARDER!

Fridays, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Workshops offered simultaneously in two formats:
Face-to-face (Rm. 213, 2nd Floor, Ellis Library) and live online (unless otherwise directed)
Registration preferred:

http://tinyurl.com/MUlibrariesworkshops

Sept. 1: Staying Ahead of the Curve

Sept. 8: Demystifying the Literature Review

Sept. 15: Search Techniques for the Literature Review

Sept. 22: How to Fact-Check & Verify the News

Sept. 29: Special Collections & Archives (Rm 401 Ellis Library, in-person only)

Oct. 6: EndNote (in-person only)

Oct. 13: Mendeley (in-person only)

Oct. 20: Zotero (in-person only)

Oct. 27: Maximizing Your Research Identity

Nov. 3: Open Educational Resources (OER)

Nov. 10: I’ve Gotta Teach! Putting Together a Syllabus (Rm 114A, Ellis Library)

Dec. 1: Semester Wrap-up (Rm 159, Ellis Library)

Workshop recordings at: libraryguides.missouri.edu/recordingsandtutorials

Click here for the 2017 Fall Friday Workshop Flyer

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits “Of Civil Wrongs and Rights” Viewing

“Of Civil Wrongs and Rights” Viewing

Join us on August 30th at 4 p.m. in Ellis Auditorium for a viewing of the PBS documentary Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story. If you don't have time to read this year's One Read Program pick, Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves, or if you want to learn more, this is the event for you. This PBS documentary tells the story of Japanese-American internment through the experience, resistance, and trial of Fred Korematsu.

Snacks will be provided thanks to the Friends of the University of Missouri Libraries.

The One Read Program, which promotes conversations regarding diversity, inclusion, and social justice through students, faculty, and staff reading a particular book together, is sponsored by Mizzou Law and Mizzou Libraries. For more information, see this guide or visit the exhibit through September 29. Copies of the book are available for checkout.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Eclipses Display

Are you excited for the total solar eclipse on August 21st? Stop by Ellis Library to take a look at books about other eclipses. The display is near the Reference Desk at Ellis Library, and all books on display are available for check out. Topics range from political science to YA fiction to philosophy and more. You can also read The Smithsonian Eclipse Expedition of June 8, 1918 (with four plates) by L. B. Aldrich. What celestial treasures will you find? 

TAGS:

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

home Ellis Library, Events and Exhibits “Infamy”: One Read Program Exhibit on Display in Ellis Library

“Infamy”: One Read Program Exhibit on Display in Ellis Library

Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves is this year's One Read Program selection. The One Read Program is sponsored by Mizzou Law and MU Libraries in order to facilitate conversations of diversity, inclusion, and social justice throughout the MU community. This year's selection, Infamy, tells the shameful story of the United States' forced relocation of thousands of Japanese-Americans to internment camps during the Second World War.

An exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade features a list of internment camps throughout U.S. history and a map of their locations. In addition to general information and a timeline of events relating Japanese-American internment, photos capturing various elements of life in the camps show viewers a glimpse of this reprehensible part of our history. Examples of propaganda from the time are also highlighted. The exhibit will be on display through September 29.

For more information on the book, events, additional resources, and information on the One Read Program, see this guide. Copies of the book are available for checkout in Ellis Library, the Journalism Library, and the Law Library.

home Ellis Library, Resources and Services, Support the Libraries Thank You, Student Fee Capital Improvement Committee

Thank You, Student Fee Capital Improvement Committee

Mizzou Libraries would like to thank the Student Fee Capital Improvement Committee for funding new furniture for the computer and work areas on the first floor of Ellis Library. The furniture includes numerous much-needed chairs in the computer and work spaces on the first floor, with a few more yet to come.

This photo shows a work area near Government Documents that has been refreshed with new tables as well as chairs. The furniture was chosen to make collaborative work easier.

The Student Fee Capital Improvement Committee provided $50,000 of funding for this improvement project.

Thanks also to Mizzou Libraries staff who helped with the project, including Gwen Gray, who filed the SFCIC proposal; Ann Riley, who envisioned the collaborative space; Pat Jones and Kathy Peters, who helped select the furniture; and others who provided assistance with the project.

 

 

One Read Program Events

The following events have been scheduled to facilitate conversation regarding this year’s One Read Program selection: Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves. Infamy tells the shameful story of the United States’ forced relocation of thousands of Japanese-Americans to internment camps during the Second World War.

August 30 @ 4 pm: PBS Documentary – Of Civil Wrongs and Rights
If you don’t have time to read Infamy or if you want to learn more, this is the event for you. This PBS documentary tells the story of Japanese-American internment through the experience, resistance, and trial of Fred Korematsu.
Ellis Auditorium

September 6 @ 1 pm: Dr. Michael Hosokawa
Dr. Hosokawa, a Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the MU School of Medicine, will share his experience behind barbed wire in a Japanese-American internment camp during World War II.
Hulston Hall 7

September 25 @ 1 pm: Dr. Jacqueline Font-Guzmán
Dr. Font-Guzmán is a professor of Law at Creighton University and is a certified mediator and arbitrator by the Puerto Rico Supreme Court. Her research explores healthcare disparities, law, and conflict engagement in addition to how marginalized individuals create counter-narratives to address institutional injustice.
Hulston Hall 7

(Tentative) October 6 @ 12:30-2 pm: Baher Azmy
Baher Azmy is the Legal Director of the Center for Constitutional Rights and is known for his litigation and advocacy for civil and human rights, specifically the rights of Guantanamo detainees. He has additionally litigated cases challenging police misconduct and the violation of immigrant and prisoner rights.
Hulston Hall 7

October 18 @ 5 pm: How Fear Leads to Atrocity
Join a panel of MU faculty from a variety of departments to discuss how social, political, and psychological rationales can lead to discrimination and injustice.
Ellis Library 114A

The One Read Program, which promotes conversations regarding diversity, inclusion, and social justice through students, faculty, and staff reading a particular book together, is sponsored by Mizzou Law and MU Libraries.

For more information on the book, events, additional resources, and information on the One Read Program, see this guide or check out the exhibit in the Ellis Library Colonnade through September 29. Copies of the book are available for checkout in Ellis Library, the Journalism Library, and the Law Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recorded Sound Update

With the retirement of David Truesdell, the Recorded Sound Center is no longer open for walk-in service.  Materials will still be available for checkout.

To check out a compact disc or album, use the MERLIN Catalog to find the item, then press the "REQUEST" button at the top left and enter your MyZou login (pawprint) and password. The pickup location should default to MU Ellis Library Circulation, so next hit the submit button.

Circulation will pull the item from Recorded Sound and notify you by email that it is available for pickup at the Circulation desk. Usually within 24 hours. 

Contact Mike Muchow, Humanities Librarian, at muchowm@missouri.edu or 573-882-3224 if you have additional questions.

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

home Ellis Library, Special Collections, Archives, and Rare Books, Staff news Grace Atkins and Kelli Hansen Present at the Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference

Grace Atkins and Kelli Hansen Present at the Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference

Grace Atkins, User Engagement Librarian, and Kelli Hansen, Print Collections Librarian, Rare Books & Special Collections, gave a presentation on the News Hub at the Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) Conference on April 3rd. Both Grace and Kelli attended the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin, where the conference was held.

Immediately following their presentation, Grace presented #TheStruggleIsReal: How to Maintain Positive Social Media Engagement with Your Community Even When They're Saying Things You Don't Want to Hear with Allyssa Guzman, Digital Scholarship Librarian at the University of Texas at Austin. The two discussed using social media as a way to engage with library users, not simply to advertise.

The turn-out for Grace and Kelli's presentation, Library News Hub: Centralizing Marketing for Decentralized Outreach, demonstrated that lots of libraries are struggling with managing marketing and communications. The audience had questions about how to implement similar systems at their libraries.

Grace and Kelli started working on the News Hub in the summer of 2016. They didn't want to simply create another blog but to create a true content management system. With the help of testing conducted by the library's usability committee, they created a centralized system to compile announcements, post to social media, and create engaging emails and newsletters. Now they are focusing on the New Hub's ability to foster better communication with and among library staff. The News Hub's primary function is to be an anchor for distribution of marketing content across all of MU Libraries' digital communication channels.

Looking forward, Grace and Kelli see lots of possibilities for further use of the News Hub. In June, the marketing team will discuss what's working and what needs improvement at their annual retreat. They look forward to providing more personalized training for staff to become comfortable using the News Hub and surveying subscribers to the newsletters.

 

 

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian

home Ellis Library, Engineering Library, Staff news Grace Atkins and Kate Wright Win Scholarships to Association of College & Research Libraries’ Annual Conference

Grace Atkins and Kate Wright Win Scholarships to Association of College & Research Libraries’ Annual Conference

Grace Atkins, User Engagement Librarian, won an Early-career Librarian Scholarship and Kate Wright, Library Specialist Sr. at the Engineering Library, won a Library Support Staff Scholarship to the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) annual conference in Baltimore, MD, March 22-25. This was Kate's first national conference and Grace's second time attending ACRL (she previously attended as a student).

Conference Highlights

Winning scholarships presented Grace and Kate with extra networking opportunities. They attended a breakfast for scholarship winners and were able to meet members of the scholarship committee. Business cards were exchanged at each table, with a twist. Each person wrote answers to two questions on the back of the card, allowing everyone a chance to get to know a little more about the others, both professionally and personally. Kate says it was a nice conversation starter.

Dr. Carla Hayden's keynote address was a "huge highlight" for Grace because she "worships her." Because of her scholarship, Grace was also able to attend the preconference workshop Running Effective OER and Open Textbook Initiatives at Your Academic Library. Grace says she tweets during sessions and connects with others who attended the session in person afterward. The conference events felt like "a reunion" to Grace because she was able to connect with librarians she attended graduate school with and meet the professionals they know.

Both Grace and Kate enjoyed ACRL because it is a large national conference–and yet focused at the same time.

Exploring Baltimore

Both Grace and Kate were able to attend a reception sponsored by the American Theological Library Association (ATLA) at the National Aquarium. Grace visited Edgar Allan Poe's grave, and Kate enjoyed exploring the Inner Harbor and the amazing restaurants, including this incredible French Dip.

Tips for Scholarship Success and Attending a National Conference

First, apply for scholarships, always! Grace recommends looking at the theme for the conference and tying that into your application. It needs to be clear that your interests connect with the theme of the conference. Kate recommends "getting over your fear" of showing your application essay to other colleagues. Having several people look over your materials helps you make sure that they are personalized. Sending a generic essay usually isn't successful.

As far as attending a large conference, be sure to download the conference app, if available. When it comes to scheduling your time, Grace recommends having a tentative schedule for each day but being flexible; for example, continuing a conversation with a knowledgeable colleague can be a valuable reason to alter your schedule. When making her schedule, Grace tries to balance sessions related to her current projects with her personal interests. This allows her to gain tools in areas where she is building her expertise while learning more about social justice within the profession. Grace also recommends asking yourself whether you are interested in a practical session about a particular tool or a session about theoretical approaches to a particular problem.

Choosing which sessions to attend can be a learning experience in and of itself. Kate recommends the career-oriented sessions for students on the job market. She attended several sessions relating to her current position, such as designing LibGuides and encouraging faculty to use open resources in the face of rising textbook costs. Kate also learned that it's okay to (politely) skip out early on occasion if you need to get to another session.

Jennifer Gravley

Reference and Instruction Librarian