Datasets on the News Media

Datasets on the News Mediajump-roper

You may download any of the datasets below from the Roper Center website.

Pew/PSRAI Poll: July 2003 Media Update

Study# USPEW2003-MEDIA
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates International
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Dates: June 19-July 2, 2003
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 1,201
Variables: 140
Major topics covered:
George W. Bush job performance (1); how closely followed news stories this past month (5); press job performance in covering certain news stories (5); how much coverage given to certain news stories (5); people in the news (10); Bill Clinton will turn out to have been one of the best/better than most/not as good as most/definitely worse than most presidents (1); how does respondent get news about national and international issues (2); President Bush is doing all he can/could be doing more to improve economic conditions (1); President Bush is doing all he can/could be doing more to deal with health care problems in America (1); problems with the health care system (6); Republican/Democratic party could do a better job reforming the U.S. health care system (1); media criticism of political leaders (1); media criticism of the military (1); think news organizations get facts straight/are often inaccurate (1); think news organizations deal fairly with all sides/tend to favor one side (1); think news organizations are pretty independent/often influenced by powerful people and organizations (1); think news organizations pay too much attention to good news/bad news/think they report the kinds of stories they should be covering (1); phrases that best describe news organizations (10); think some news organizations are/are not becoming too pro-American (2); issues about television news reporting (3); are news organizations being fair/unfair to the Bush administration (1); press has been too critical/not critical enough of the Bush administration policies and performance so far (1); have/have not heard about Federal Communications Commission proposal to reduce current limits on number of news outlets one company can own (1); allowing companies to own more TV, radio, and newspaper outlets in a community would have a positive/negative impact on the country/wouldn’t make much difference (1); ever been quoted/mentioned in a news story that was published or aired (2); satisfied/dissatisfied with the way the story turned out when quoted/mentioned in a news story (1); think news organizations do/do not pay attention to complaints from the public about inaccuracies in news reports (1); have/have not heard about some serious problems with reporting at the New York Times that led to the resignation of its top editors (1); how often think reporters make up stories (1); news coverage of the war on terrorism should be pro-American/neutral (1); Hillary Clinton (1); Al Gore (1); think U.S. made right/wrong decision in using military force against Iraq (1); how well is U.S. military effort in Iraq going (1); favor/oppose a major American effort to rebuild Iraq and establish a stable government there (1); use/do not use a computer on at least an occasional basis (1); ever go online (1).

War Tracking Poll

Study# USPEW2003-03WAR
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: March 20-April 7, 2003
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 3,620
Variables: 228
Major topics covered:
George W. Bush job performance (3); feelings about life (1); news about war in Iraq (21); military force in Iraq (3); learned about war in Iraq (3); TV news broadcast in respondent’s area (1); personal financial situation (2); economic conditions in the U.S. (1); George W. Bush and improving the economy (1); press job performance (1); Americans’ views about war in Iraq (3); news of war: pro-American or neutral (9); U.S. to rebuild Iraq (1); pay for cost of war in Iraq (1); accurate picture of war in Iraq (2); feeling depressed about the war (1); difficulty concentrating (1); trouble sleeping (1); feelings about TV coverage of the war (5); life changes as result of the war (7); victim of terrorist attacks (1); worries about the war (6); news dispatches from combat areas (1); Iraqi TV of U.S. POWs (1); U.S. winning the war in Iraq (1); children in the household (3); children following the war (4); children’s feelings about the war (2); children talking about the war (9); using a computer (1); using the internet (28); email about war in Iraq (9); information about war in Iraq from the web (22); on-line discussion about the war in Iraq (2); using the internet regarding the war in Iraq (3).

Biennial Media Consumption Survey (2002)

Roper study number: USPEW2002-MEDIA
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: April 19-May 12, 2002
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 3,002
Major topics covered:
George W. Bush Job Performance (1); Reading the Paper (3); Watching TV News (5); Listening to radio news (2); Stories covered by news organizations (1); Reading magazines (2); Reading books (2); Activities done yesterday (1); Frequency of watching or listening to TV and Radio programs (2); Frequency of reading certain types of publications (1); Using a computer outside of the home (1); Sending email online (1); Morning News (3); Getting news on the weekday (2); News around the dinner hour (2); Weekday evening news (2); Watched TV news yesterday (1); Enjoy keeping up with news (1); Radio shows with open discussion (1); Information over load (1); Knowledge of Current National and International news topics (1); Miss getting news from certain sources (2); Following different types of news (1); Following national news (1); Following international news (1); Following Local community news (1); Cable TV (2); Direct V or dish Network (1); Number of TV Channels: Receive versus Watch (2); Importance of News (1); Watching news with a remote control in hand (1); Need more time to follow news (1); News that is out of touch with people (1); Background information and interest in the news (1); Frequency of receiving news (1); News source for checking in (1); Important news issues/interests (1); Online news and frequency of getting news from other sources (3); Types of news you receive online (2); Receiving online news alerts (1); Receiving online News (1); Press job performance in covering certain issues (1); Amount of Attention to foreign news by the press (1); Reasons for not following international news (1); Types of interest given to international news (1); Possession of certain electronic devices (2).

2002 Believability Survey

Study# USPEW2002-BELIEVE
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: May 6-16, 2002
Sample: National adult (1,002)
Major topics covered:
Believability in certain news organizations (1); Interest in different kinds of news stories (1); Watching or listening to certain TV and Radio Programs (2); Keeping up with the news (1); TV and radio stations performance in informing the public (1); Free TV airtime for candidates before Elections (2); TV and Radio Stations licenses to broadcast over the airwaves (1); Using a computer (1); On-line access (1); Direction of Country (1); Republican leaders job performances (1); Democratic leaders job performances (1); Democratic Party responding to Bush Policies and Proposals (1); Republicans and Democrats working together or against each other (1); Republicans VS Democrats: best ideas on certain areas (1); Republican Party and Traditional Positions (1); Democratic Party and Traditional Positions (1)

Media Update (2002)

Study# USPEW2002-07
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey Sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Date: July 2002
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 1,365
Variables: 75
Major topics covered: George W. Bush job performance (1); stories covered by the news (2); news media (3); news criticizing political leaders (1); news criticizing the military (1); accuracy in reporting news facts (1); government and terrorism (2); press (news) covering terrorism (1); government and business regulation (1); TV news reporting (1); World Cup Soccer Tournament (1).

Media Attitudes/Youth Engagement/Religion After 9/11

Study# USPEW2001-11
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey Sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Date: November 2001
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 1,500
Variables: 138
Major topics covered: George W. Bush job approval (1); New stories from past month (7); Method of hearing news about terrorism (10); Job performance of press (1); Military action against those responsible for terror attacks (2); Interested in news (2); News media in society (1); News criticism of people hinder job performance (2); News correct/incorrect (1); Phrase that describes news organizations (8); Feelings about federal government (7); People trusted/not trusted (1); Things in the news (4); Confidence in military (1); Confidence in government (1); News censorship (4); Accurate news coverage (4); Military hiding bad news (1); Government hiding bad news (1); News giving Osama Bin Laden opportunity (1); Discussion on stopping terrorism (1); More control over news (2); Better news coverage (3); Reason’s for News censorship (1); Results of terrorist attacks (4); Religion gaining or losing influence (1); Attend religious services (2); How important is religion (1); Opinion of..(8); Know anyone Muslim (1); Knowledge of Muslim practices (2); Closer to view (2); Worry when U.S. uses force (1); Reason’s for terrorist attacks (1); God protecting U.S. (1); Use computer/Internet (2).

Biennial Media Consumption Survey (2000)

Study# USPEW2000-MEDIA
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: April 20-May 13, 2000
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 3,142
Variables: 189
Major topics covered:
Satisfied/dissatisfied with direction of country (1); where would get news first in certain events (6); read daily newspaper[s] (3); watch TV news programs (3); listen to news on radio (2); watch major TV network evening news programs (1); followed news stories in past month (5); read magazines (2); how often watch/listen to certain TV and radio programs (23); how often read certain types of publications (5); enjoy keeping up with news (1); listen to radio shows that invite listeners to call in to discuss current events (1); feel overloaded with information/like having so much information available (1); Alan Greenspan (1); Federal Reserve Bank (1); Dow Jones Industrial (1); satisfied with choices on TV (2); follow different types of news (17); satisfied with media coverage of certain people/events (4); cable TV (2); political views (1); more important to get general information about events/news about personal interests (1); statements about news (4); use a computer (1); ever go online (1); online news (11); news sources (7); stock (4); decisions about how and where to invest money (2); how often get information about financial markets (1); sources for stock market updates and quotes for stocks/mutual funds (12); how often get information about investing (1); sources for information about investing (6); own certain items (6); 1996 presidential election (1).

Law and the Media Survey

Study# USCSRA2000-CRIMETV
Survey firm: Center for Survey Research & Analysis
Survey Sponsor:
Date: February 17-March 7, 2000
Sample: National Adult
Sample size: 1,001
Major topics covered: Questionnaire asks subjects what law/police television shows they watch, about which news programs they watch, and about their exposure to various news sources (newspaper, radio, TV, internet, etc.) It asks for their knowledge of the American legal system. It asks for their opinions of victims’ rights, rights of the accused, and about various legal processes within the criminal justice system. It asks their perceptions of lawyers, judges, prosecuting attorneys, police, and other professions. It asks asks questions about subjects’ fear of becoming a victim of crime, whether crime is a serious problem where they live, and questions about whether they perceive legal processes as being fair. It asks about their own personal involvement in the legal or criminal justice system. General demographic questions are also included (age, sex, income, race, education, etc.)

Media Consumption, 1998

Study# USPEW1998-98004MEDIA
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: April 24-May 11, 1998
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 3,002
Variables: 144
Major topics covered:
Clinton job performance (1); Republicans in Congress job performance (1); newspaper readership (3); television (4); radio (2); current news stories (1); magazine news media (2); local news media (2); news source (14); Speaker of the House (1); cholesterol (1); weather (1); types of news (13); international news (1); kids watching news (4); news (12); Internet (18); computer ownership (1); cable television (1); religion (1); born again Christian (1).

Believability of Media/People

Study# USPEW1998-BELIEVE
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Dates: May 7-13, 1998
Sample: National adult
Sample size: 981
Variables: 86
Major topics covered:
Clinton job performance (1); Republicans in Congress job performance (1); most important problem (1); rate believability of media (20); rate believability of people (24); newspaper readership (1); TV and radio programs (14); 2000 presidential election (1); common cold vaccine (1); Tiger Woods (1); Boris Yeltsin (1); TV and newspaper news stories (3); religion (1); ‘born-again’ Christian (1).

Media Consumption (1996)

Study# USPEW1996-96004
Survey firm: Princeton Survey Research Associates
Survey sponsor: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
Field dates: April 19-25, 1996
Sample: National Adult
Sample size:1,751
Variables: 135
Major topics covered:
Clinton job performance(1); Republicans in Congress(1); newspapers(7); television programs(14); radio(5); attention paid to recent news stories(8); 1996 election(2); government(4); personal finances(1); homosexuality(1); childhood experiences(8); magazines(3); network news(5); local news(4); name of the Speaker of the House(1); name party in control of the House(1); amount of minimum wage(1); names of the countries Clinton has visited(1); attention paid to different types of news(14); source of news on the 1996 election(7); favorability of different people and organizations(12); media bias in the 1996 election(1); computers(2); on-line information(2); cable television(2); religious preference(1); born-again Christianity(1).

News in Wartime

Study# USNORC1941-0103
Survey firm: National Opinion Research Center [NORC]
Field dates: December 1941
Sample: National Adult
Sample size: 1,283
Major topics covered: Preferred source for news, opinion regarding ethics of wartime news censorship, opinion on how war information should be released to public, media’s role in creating hope or discouragement during wartime, opinion about America’s overall involvement in WWII, perceived level of danger to the United States, opinion about the United States’ best military strategy, opinion about Japanese, German and Italian aliens living in the United States, perceived loyalty of those aliens to the United States, respondent’s demographic data (ancestral background, occupation, gender, age, education, religion, etc.

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